Even if eating only foods available to hunter–gatherers in the Paleolithic made sense, it would be impossible. As Christina Warinner of the University of Zurich emphasizes in her 2012 TED talk, just about every single species commonly consumed today—whether a fruit, vegetable or animal—is drastically different from its Paleolithic predecessor. In most cases, we have transformed the species we eat through artificial selection: we have bred cows, chickens and goats to provide as much meat, milk and eggs as possible and have sown seeds only from plants with the most desirable traits—with the biggest fruits, plumpest kernels, sweetest flesh and fewest natural toxins. Cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts and kale are all different cultivars of a single species, Brassica oleracea; generation by generation, we reshaped this one plant's leaves, stems and flowers into wildly different arrangements, the same way we bred Welsh corgis, pugs, dachshunds, Saint Bernards and greyhounds out of a single wolf species. Corn was once a straggly grass known as teosinte and tomatoes were once much smaller berries. And the wild ancestors of bananas were rife with seeds.
I love this bread! Like many others, it needed about twice as long in the oven. I also add sunflower seeds to mine (which do turn green in subsequent days but still taste delicious!). This is a fantastic bread if you want something less eggy. It’s a little crumbly, so not really a bread to make a sandwich with, but delicious with a spread, by itself, or as an open face type sandwich. I use coconut cream in mine and Earth Balance soy free ‘butter’ to make it dairy free.
Life Without Bread: How a Low-Carbohydrate Diet Can Save Your Life by Christian B. Allan, Wolfgang Lutz. It is based on Dr. Lutz's work with thousands of patients in Austria. It deals with the health issues connected to high carb consumption. It is basically an English version and update of Dr. Lutz's 1967 book with the same title: Leben ohne Brot. He recommends eating only 72 grams of carbohydrates, and an unlimited amount of fat. And provides evidence as to why this is the healthiest diet. Read the review at Amazon by Todd Moody (it will be first!). See excerpts from his earlier edition: Dismantling a Myth: The Role of Fat and Carbohydrates in our Diet
I just found this recipe and I notice that the recipes are very similar: this one has the addition of a little coconut flour, half the salt and half the vinegar, but maintains the baking soda quantity. How does the the texture of this bread compare to your low carb corn bread? I’m very curious about what went into the decisions that differentiate the two breads.

I make three loaves of Paleo 2.0 bread and Paleo Rye bread every two weeks and they both freeze well. Thanks for these recipes. All of our children and grandchildren love them. We are moving from Illinois to Colorado Springs and are worried that the high altitude will create problems. Hoping that we will find by testing how to recreate these delicious breads.
Legumes are members of a large family of plants that have a seed or pod. This category includes all beans, peas, lentils, tofu and other soyfoods, and peanuts. Legumes are not allowed on paleo because of their high content of lectins and phytic acid. Similar to grains, this is a point of controversy in the scientific community. In fact, lots of research supports eating legumes as part of a healthy diet because they are low in fat and high in fiber, protein and iron.
I’m new to the paleo lifestyle, if I’m honest I’m new to healthy non fast food lifestyle as well. I have recently undergone gastric sleeve surgery and had thought I would never be able to eat a sandwich ever again. Then I found the Paleo food movement and in particular your site. I have tried a lot of your recipes and this bread is my favorite. I love how moist it is and that it remains fresh for a full week. It also freezes well too. Thank you so much for re-introducing me to the sandwich.
"Every fad diet thinks it has discovered the root of all evil," says Dr. Ochner. But nutrients in legumes, whole grains, and dairy—all of which are forbidden on the paleo diet—can help to lower the risk of osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease, reduce blood pressure, and promote a healthy weight, he says. Cutting dairy, the primary source of calcium and vitamin D in modern diets, is especially worrisome for women who want to avoid osteoporosis.
It’s easy to find more guidance online, but a book also makes a handy reference. "The Paleo Diet," for example, outlines basic Paleo principles and offers three “levels” that allow for different degrees of cheating – three “open meals” per week on the “entry level” plan, two on “maintenance” and just one on “maximal.” Depending on the level, you might also get “transitional” condiments (low-fat dressing and salsa) and drinks (coffee, beer or wine in moderation) to wash down the meat and plants. You can use the levels as you like. Start with the first and move gradually to the more restrictive – or just stay put. For more dramatic changes, head right to the third. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CeEcNmmiyNM
We did the same thing with sunflower sead butter in paleo bread the other day. We ran out of cashew butter (as the recipe called for) and filled in the final put with sunflower seed butter. Top half of the bread turned bright green! Some in the house wouldn’t eat it, but I loved it! And it was pretty cool when we looked up why it happened. Excited to try this recipe, thanks for sharing! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GnLc95VpW5Q

Thank you for this amazing recipe! I didn’t have rings so I used 3 of my 4″ pyrex glass dishes to make 3 buns. I love the texture and the taste is mild. I initially made them for burger buns but now I see they can be so versatile – egg sammies, toast with jam, eggs benedict, mini pizzas, burgers, and so on. Can’t wait to make them again – this is going to be a staple in my house! Thank you!!
Finally made this recipe, is my second bread recipe I’ve made and the top is nice but the inside always feels moist … I am putting it in the oven a bit more to see if it dries out, is that the texture that it should have because of the butter or what? I liked the flavor! Just not sure of how is supposed to be inside. I haven’t watched the video yet. Thanks!!
This 5 minute bread literally blew my mind! Wanna know why? Well for starters, it is super easy to make! Only a few ingredients. Throw it in a blender (or food processor). Then bake in the oven. And after it comes out??? Well, that’s when the really good stuff starts happening! Like devouring slice after slice:) This bread is so incredibly soft on the inside and has a moist texture like a loaf of homemade sandwich bread.

Thanks for the recipe! I actually made it this morning, but instead of making it as a loaf bread, I cooked the batter up pancake style. Mostly because I wanted “bread” quickly! I really wanted a BLT for breakfast so using your batter as a pancake, made it cook quickly. Then I quickly whipped up some homemade mayo and fried some bacon. What a tasty breakfast! Thanks again!!


The Carnitine Miracle by Robert Crayhon, M.S. The nutrient carnitine is abundant in red meat. According to Crayhon carnitine helps balance blood lipids and blood sugar levels, maximizes energy levels, increases endurance, eliminates discomfort in ketosis, promotes burning of fat and building of muscle and increases overall well-being. See reviews at Amazon.
In Defense of Food: An Eater's Manifesto by Michael Pollan gives a guided tour of 20th century food science, a history of "nutritionism" in America and a look at the marriage of government and the food industry. Then the book presents a commonsense shopping-and-eating guide, which like the paleo diet focuses on shopping the perimeter of the supermarket. He also now has a much shorter Food Rules: An Eater's Manual.
The Paleo diet is the healthiest way you can eat because it is the ONLY nutritional approach that works with your genetics to help you stay lean, strong and energetic! Research in biology, biochemistry, Ophthalmology, Dermatology and many other disciplines indicate it is our modern diet, full of refined foods, trans fats and sugar, that is at the root of degenerative diseases such as obesity, cancer, diabetes, heart disease, Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, depression and infertility. – Robb Wolf
I just made it using all the the optional ingredients but I didn’t have a food processor so I whipped/mixed everything by hand. One thing I noticed is that the top of the bread cracked unevenly. Could I have over fluffed the egg whites? Maybe creating an artificial cut in the middle could solve that next time? It rose very well and nearly doubled in size, though the size is still a bit small for my liking. I will most likely use 1.5x the amount next time. It smells great and I’m about to chow down on this!
Hi there, it’s Lacey! I’m the editor and main writer for A Sweet Pea Chef. I'm a food blogger, health and food coach, professional photographer, and mommy of three. I also run the awesome free Take Back Your Health Community, am the healthy and clean weekly meal planner behind No-Fail Meals, and a little bit in love with Clean Eating. Be sure to check out my free beginner’s guide to eating clean and follow me on YouTube and Instagram to get my latest recipes and healthy eating inspiration. Read More… https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0KQgyfPixmw
So I’m pretty familiar with the science of baking, and I also understand there’s significant differences when omitting gluten. The recipe calls for sour cream, and vinegar, both acids that work best as leaveners when combined with baking soda, then baking powder (1 part soda 2 parts cream of tartar (another acid) and straight cream of tartar. So it calls for acid in four separate forms. In standard baking that calls for baking powder you add soda when adding additional acid such as sour cream, buttermilk etc… when a small amount of acid is added to bread dough it increases the yeasts ability to give lift by creating gluten, but to much kills the yeast entirely. So in the absence of gluten, isn’t the acid used here excessive? I wonder if a reduction would cause greater rise? What is the purpose of the baking powder combined with the yeast? Can you please explain the science behind this? P.S. the flavor of this was excellent but it didn’t rise as expected despite an excellent yeast test, fresh powder, and 1 hour in the proof box.
I am so happy that I found your site! I have been trying for a couple years to find a good bread/roll recipe (I’m kind of picky) and this is the first one that I have absolutely loved. My kids love them too. I am going to order the molds you use but for now am making them in a muffin pan and they turn out great. So far I’ve used them with tuna salad and your sloppy joe recipe (which is also delicious! ) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WT3-ea4BwiE
Another possibility is that maybe your oven is not well calibrater (which is normal) and your bread needed to cook longer. I suggest next time you insert the stick in a few areas to ensure it’s done throughout. Also, it’s a good idea to purchase an oven thermometer to ensure the temperature is where you want it during baking. They cost less that $20, I got mine for less than $10.
What did I do wrong? This came out VERY moist… like a banana bread. Nothing like loaf/sandwich bread. I did end up cooking it nearly 31 minutes because pick still wasn’t coming out clean. Mine seems much darker too. I didn’t use the flax seeds (daughter has a sensory issue with nuts/seeds in breads) (You’ll notice I put sesame seeds on half for me…would that make it that much different? I used the proper size – but glass pan (all I have in loaf style) Flavor is good… but far too dense to consider using for a sandwich and not sure how Biikeweaver got 18 servings (!?) from this size loaf pan? But THANK YOU for posting. This was my FIRST attempt, so I’ll try again!
I love love love love!!! This recipe. My only questions are how should I store the bread? And how long should it last without spoiling? I made a loaf on Sunday evening and kept it in an airtight container on my counter. By Friday morning (or maybe even before because I hadn’t eaten it for a day or so) it was ripe. Smelled like something was fermenting. Any tips? Maybe I should have stored it in the fridge.
How inventive!! Elana, we would love for you to share this wonderful recipe with our community since I know our Paleo/Primal friends will just love this. If you’re interested, please take a minute to submit the recipe at fastpaleo.com/upload-a-recipe/. Feel free to plug your blog at the beginning of the directions section, and we’re more than happy to give your Facebook page a shoutout when we post it! This is exactly the kind of delicious and healthy recipe people are asking for!
Closely examining one group of modern hunter–gatherers—the Hiwi—reveals how much variation exists within the diet of a single small foraging society and deflates the notion that hunter–gatherers have impeccable health. Such examination also makes obvious the immense gap between a genuine community of foragers and Paleo dieters living in modern cities, selectively shopping at farmers' markets and making sure the dressing on their house salad is gluten, sugar and dairy free. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mJK74-LC4hE
I just made it using all the the optional ingredients but I didn’t have a food processor so I whipped/mixed everything by hand. One thing I noticed is that the top of the bread cracked unevenly. Could I have over fluffed the egg whites? Maybe creating an artificial cut in the middle could solve that next time? It rose very well and nearly doubled in size, though the size is still a bit small for my liking. I will most likely use 1.5x the amount next time. It smells great and I’m about to chow down on this! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I0TMQ87vA9E
Thank you so much! This was delicious, didn’t crumble and fall apart like most g.f. breads. I brought it to my Bible Study group, one gal is on the Paleo diet and I am gluten free, two gals can eat anything. They all loved it. It is so easy to make, again, thank you so much for posting. I’ve already shared the recipe with two of the gals in the group. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SrjjJnfLxC0
I love this recipe and I like to tweak things. I came up with a tweak to make banana bread. Since holiday baking is my weakness and I had an almost suicidal reaction to wheat (I really know I’m allergic now) I wanted some banana bread. I subbed 1 cup of almond flour to walnut flour, omitted the ACV, added sweetener to taste, 1 tsp vanilla, 1 tsp pumpkin pie spice (sugar free) and 1 mashed banana. I LOVE banana so I also added a little banana flavoring. Baked up to a heavenly bread that I can eat without bloating and severe mood reactions!! I LOVE this site for recipes!! My next attempt will be either pumpkin bread or orange cranberry. Makes a great “I NEED SWEET” snack or breakfast as I’m zooming out the door.

Thank you so much for posting this recipe. I have been looking for a Paleo bread recipe. I already purchased the ingredients and am looking forward to my first loaf. The only substitution I’m going to make it using Bob’s Red Mill tapioca powder instead of arrowroot because I have it handy and need to use it*. Both are thickening agents so I don’t think it will affect the outcome. I do want to note here for you and your readers that although the yogurt comments you have are true (in my opinion as a degreed microbiologist),”…the live active probiotic bacteria in yogurt can rev up your immune system…”, these comments are void for this recipe because the live cultures will not withstand the baking process. The beneficial bactiera will die. You could still add the yogurt (I’m going to add almond milk yogurt or coconut milk yogurt since they are my favorites) to enhance the flavor of the bread but this addition will not impart probiotics to the bread. I think this is an important clarification as right now it reads as if this recipe will contain probiotics. Hope that helps and thanks again. I am so excited to use this recipe! Be well 🙂
— HOW I WORK IT: I am 10 years into maintaining my 35 lb weight loss, and it continues to be a conscious effort. Right now the best way I am able to include Elana’s recipes into my post-weight-loss and weight-maintenance life is by following the gaps diet, which includes hearty soups as the basis for eating, filled in by some nut baked goods. Enjoy!
The Paleolithic or “Paleo” diet seeks to address 21st century ills by revisiting the way humans ate during the Paleolithic era more than 2 million years ago. Paleo proponents state that because our genetics and anatomy have changed very little since the Stone Age, we should eat foods available during that time to promote good health. Our predecessors used simple stone tools that were not advanced enough to grow and cultivate plants, so they hunted, fished, and gathered wild plants for food. If they lived long enough, they were believed to experience less modern-day diseases like diabetes, cancer, and heart disease because of a consistent diet of lean meats and plant foods along with a high level of physical activity from intensive hunting. However, the life expectancy of our predecessors was only a fraction of that of people today. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S4j4JsvIvaQ
Hi Elana…I did this with your bread and it was ridiculously tasty!!! Herb roasted tomatoes on top of your Paleo bread spread with a little leftover chevre that I’d rolled in some Creole seasoning. I LOVE this bread (well, and all of your recipes really)!!! Thank you. https://www.facebook.com/holly.oleary.14/posts/10204240445388312?comment_id=10204240832958001&offset=0&total_comments=8
But the Paleo diet bans more than just highly processed junk foods—in its most traditional form, it prohibits any kind of food unavailable to stone age hunter–gatherers, including dairy rich in calcium, grains replete with fiber, and vitamins and legumes packed with protein. The rationale for such constraint—in fact the entire premise of the Paleo diet—is, at best, only half correct. Because the human body adapted to life in the stone age, Paleo dieters argue—and because our genetics and anatomy have changed very little since then, they say—we should emulate the diets of our Paleo predecessors as closely as possible in order to be healthy. Obesity, heart disease, diabetes, cancer and many other "modern" diseases, the reasoning goes, result primarily from the incompatibility of our stone age anatomy with our contemporary way of eating. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QJKiugjwKlw
I found this recipe after buying Paleo Bread at Wholefoods. It was SO bad that it drove me to find a good recipe to make my own. When I read the review that it wasn’t too eggy, I was sold. I am not a huge fan of eggs (too bad for someone attempting a primal diet) so I was set to try this. I followed the directions exactly…even taking extra time to beat the eggs. I used the yoghurt instead of coconut cream. It came out perfect. Thank you for making something edible and still Paleo. I tried to give this recipe 5 stars but it’s having a glitch and won’t let me. 5 stars!!! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=czd0Er-_qI8
I really wanted to keep this nut and seed paleo bread more on the seed side. Haha, you get my point. The only nut that is really involved is almond in the almond flour. The rest are seeds such as pumpkin seeds, chia seed, and poppyseed, which you can interchange with flax or sunflower seeds. Either way, it truly gives the bread a nutty flavor that’s not too heavy. Cool?
Saturated fat has been demonized by our health authorities and media. What is the basis for this position on Saturated fat? Are current recommendations for VERY low saturated fat intake justified? How much saturated fat (and what types), if any should one eat? Without a historical and scientific perspective these questions can be nearly impossible to answer.

I followed the recipe to a tee, used all recommended ingredients. I’ve attempted making it twice, the first time I didn’t have a food processor and that was a complete fail. The second time, today, I bought a food processor and attempted it again. The egg whites were fluffy but never got to stiff peaks… maybe my eggs were too cold? Anyway, I baked for 30 mins, and it wasn’t even golden brown on the top so I didn’t put the foil on time and cooked it another 20 mins. I just pulled it out about 20 mins ago and it is golden brown. However, it is a very moist almost like a banana bread texture. I just popped it back in the oven hoping it will “dry up”. Any recommendations? Do I need to cook for and hour ? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EICS1tZ2Hp4
Vitamin D is the one supplement that would be paleo. At least it would be for those of us that don't live outside year round. You can have your D level measured. The low RDAs only prevent definable deficiences, not problems that take a long time to develop. Michael Holick, MD is a leading writer on this subject. This is a 10 page PDF: Vitamin D: importance in the prevention of cancers, type 1 diabetes, heart disease, and osteoporosis and its companion Sunlight and vitamin D for bone health and prevention of autoimmune diseases, cancers, and cardiovascular disease [change PDF to 100% to read]. Or if you prefer, there is an hour video on YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OWjvq2GB0uc
Introduction         Unless you are involved in the culinary arts or the meat industry, you probably haven’t given much thought to the term, “Saint Louis Style Pork Ribs”.   Is this dish some kind of specially spiced, spare rib recipe from St. Louis, MO?  Did it originate in a colorful Saint Louis, 20th century restaurant, or maybe it was first served at a St. Louis Cardinal baseball game in the 1930s?   All three hypotheses...
What a fantastic recipe! I just made this and my house smells like sweet, toasty almonds. The texture is light and fluffy. Can’t wait to toast it gently in my oven in the morning with a little peach jam :) I used a glass pyrex loaf pan and lined it with parchment paper and lightly oiled it with coconut oil and it came out perfect,for anyone wondering about the specific pan you mentioned, which i haven’t heard of either. Thanks for this great recipe!
The Dietitian's Guide to Eating Bugs by Daniel Calder is a comprehensive guide to the nutritional content of insects. He believes insect breeding and consumption are important elements sustainable living, particularly when it comes to complementing foraged plant material with meat products. Numerous insects contain nutrients similar to those found in more conventional livestock, except the feed to conversion ratio is much higher and they're much cheaper to breed. You can find the book at scribd. Also available in e-book format for $35.
My son can’t have eggs, so I did MAJOR substitutions, and it still turned out yummy. We usually use flax for eggs, but since this recipe already calls for flax, I used 5 different eggs substitutes: 1/4 coconut yogurt, 1/3 cup applesauce, 1/4 cup vegetable oil (I used olive), 2 heaping tbsp potato starch, 2 heaping tbsp arrowroot powder. Perhaps because we couldn’t use the eggs, there wasn’t a hard crust, but again, it was still yummy. We have to make do in a no egg diet ;). I also didn’t have the correct size loaf pan, so I used two mini loaf pans and baked them for about 25 minutes. Hope someone sees this who has to eat an egg-free diet :). https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vyxPH6jPnlw
Hey Deena, I also live in Kansas City and I’ve made this bread 2 times, also making it right now. The first time it came out perfect. The second time it didn’t rise as mush as the first but the bread was still better then any other. I always make sure the house is (hot) and everything is done by the stove 😉 I make it when no one is home but me… You can do it!!
As you might expect from the previous paragraph, eating plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables naturally leads to higher fiber intake. Dietary fiber is essential for good health, and despite what you’ve probably heard, whole grains aren’t the place to find it. Non-starchy vegetables contain eight times more fiber than whole grains and 31 times more fiber than refined grains. Even fruits contain twice as much fiber as whole grains and seven times more fiber than refined grains! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YnDzsN7ksME
Hi Laura, can your husband have cashews? You could try making it with cashew flour. Also, some people like substituting almond flour for pumpkin seed flour, or a gluten free oat flour. These may also work, but will give the bread a unique taste and texture. Happy to hear you’re not giving up and you want to try making another bread recipe 🙂 Please let me know how it goes.
Anna, I haven’t tried making this bread without the vinegar, so I don’t know for sure how the recipe would fare without it. Vinegar here is used not only for the right flavor, but also to react with the leavening agent and create the proper rise for the bread. If you take out the vinegar, you’ll need to replace it with another acid. Can you tolerate lemon juice? If so, I’d try this recipe using 2 to 3 teaspoons of fresh lemon juice in place of the vinegar. Let me know how it goes if you give it a try! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VExW4SNt3Ko
Hey Maya!! This is the 2nd recipe I’ve tried off your website and again I love it!! Turned out really well. I can have sandwiches again or a quick piece Of toast when I’m in a hurry to get out the door. I was skeptical about the xanthan gum since I tried a recipe using psyllium husk powder. I did not like it. I can’t taste the xanthan gum so I have no problem using it going forward. Thanks again for the recipe!!! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oi-920uV3UY
Another 2014 study in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition compared the effects of the Paleo plan to those of a standard low-fat diet on 70 obese, postmenopausal women. After six months, the Paleo group lost 14 pounds on average, while the other group lost nearly 6 pounds. After a year, the Paleo group had lost 19 pounds on average, and the low-fat dieters had dropped 10 pounds. A year later, both groups had regained some weight: The Paleo group was still down 10 pounds, while the low-fat group had dropped an average of more than 6 pounds.

Hello, this bread recipe looks great, and I really want to make it for my dad who is intolerant to gluten and must settle with the sad and tiny store bought gluten free loaves. However, the only bread pan I have is one inch larger in dimensions, do you recommend increasing the recipe? Like doubling it or using 1.5 times the ingredients? Thank you :)


There may be affiliate links in this post! By clicking on them, or purchasing recommended items I may receive a small compensation, at no cost to you! However, I only recommend products I absolutely love and use in my own home! Thank you for supporting Lexi's Clean Kitchen when you shop! See my privacy policy for more information about this, the information we save, and more! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QstRIqzr1eM
Thank you so much for this recipe! I’ve made it several times and I love it for myself. I have tried many versions: coconut oil, ghee, butter, coconut cream, refrigerated coconut milk from a can, shaken (after a couple of days in the fridge) and full fat yogurt. I always beat my eggs for 2-3 minutes (by hand) until very frothy before adding the wet ingredients then beat them again after incorporating wet ingredients to get them thick. Although I like them all, I have had the best results for rising (and actual ‘bread-like’ texture and loft) from coconut oil and yogurt. My husband eats gluten-free but not paleo so when his favourite GF bread was out at the store he was stuck (he’s a ‘must eat sandwich for lunch’ guy and we’ve tried all the GF varieties in our store, some of them complete rocks!). I offered to make him a loaf and he accepted (he’s had this loaf before but felt it’s texture was more like a banana bread or zucchini bread than sandwich material). I got rave reviews from him today about the bread for his sandwich (made with coconut oil and yogurt). Total convert!!
I love this bread, and so do my German, bread-loving children! Hearty, rich German bread is the best in the world so that’s no small praise. I have a regular glass loaf pan, and adapt the recipe to make a full-size loaf. I add 1 extra egg (very large) and increase other ingredients 25%. Baking time is usually 5-10 minutes longer, although I reduce the temperature to 325 after it begins to brown to compensate for the glass pan. Topped with butter or pumpkin seed butter, this is my 3-year-old son’s favorite “treat” ever!
I just made it using all the the optional ingredients but I didn’t have a food processor so I whipped/mixed everything by hand. One thing I noticed is that the top of the bread cracked unevenly. Could I have over fluffed the egg whites? Maybe creating an artificial cut in the middle could solve that next time? It rose very well and nearly doubled in size, though the size is still a bit small for my liking. I will most likely use 1.5x the amount next time. It smells great and I’m about to chow down on this! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I0TMQ87vA9E
To determine the diet rankings, US News & World Report selected a 25-person expert panel from the country's top dietitians, dietary consultants, and physicians specializing in diabetes, heart health, and weight loss. The panel included Lisa Sasson, MS, RDN, CDN, a clinical assistant professor and dietetic internship director in the department of nutrition and food studies at New York University; Jill Weisenberger, MS, RDN, CDE, CHWC, FAND, a nutrition and diabetes expert; and David L. Katz, MD, MPH, FACPM, FACP, FACLM, founding director of Yale University's Yale-Griffin Prevention Research Center, and founder of the True Health Initiative.4
Here is a way to keep Paleo fun by making a batch of Paleo pretzels. It gets boring sometimes eating a certain way, and adding novelty treats like this really makes it seem like you’re not on a diet at all. Half the fun is making these, as you don’t have to stick to the conventional pretzel shape, and can wind them into any design you wish. The other half is eating them, and there’s no worries here, since all of the ingredients conform to the parameters set by the Paleo OK foods list, a combination of coconut flour and almond flour.
Take 30 days and give it a shot – cut out the grains and dairy, start eating more vegetables and fruits, eat more humanely raised and non-grain fed meat, cut out the liquid calories and sugar, and see how you feel after the month is up. If you’re analytical and want numbers to use in your final verdict, get your blood work done at the beginning and end of the month.
Hi I am new to the grain free diet and I love this bread. Has anyone figured out the calorie count for it? I have been gluten free since 2003 and it has served me well, although I think that I could benefit from grain free. But like all diet changes that I have tried in the past I tend to gain weight if I do not know the calorie count of the new recipes. Thanks.
I wish we didn’t have to test every adjustment to a recipe to figure out if it works. It would save us all so much time and money! If I only had a crystal ball that would give me the answer to all of your substitution questions, I would be so happy. Unfortunately, I don’t. So be adventurous. If you have an idea, test it. Then come back here and let us all know if it works.
You may lose weight on the Paleo Diet. If you build a “calorie deficit” into your Paleo plan – eating fewer calories than your daily recommended max or burning off extra by exercising – you should shed some pounds. How quickly and whether you keep them off is up to you. A 2015 review in the Journal of Gastrointestinal Liver Diseases concluded that a Paleo-esque diet “might be an acceptable antidote to the unhealthy Western diet, but only unequivocal results from randomized controlled trials or meta-analyses will support this hypothesis.” On that, we’re still waiting. In the meantime, here’s what has been found about the diet and others like it:

Paleo diets are based on a simple premise – if the cavemen didn’t eat it, you shouldn’t either. So long to refined sugar, dairy, legumes and grains (this is pre-agricultural revolution), and hello to meat, fish, poultry, fruits and veggies. The idea is that by eliminating modern-era foods like highly-processed carbs and dairy, you can avoid or control “diseases of civilization” like Type 2 diabetes and heart disease, and likely lose weight too. What you eat and how much depend on your goals or the specific program you’re on, if you choose to follow one. The high-protein diet is ranked poorly among U.S. News experts, who consider it too restrictive to be healthy or sustainable.

I just made this bread tonight and all I can say is WOW! I have had the ingredients for a couple of weeks but have been afraid that it wouldn’t turn out. I should have made it the day I had everything. Thank you for the detailed instructions…I just have a couple of questions…I did find that it was a little salty, can i reduce or leave out the salt? Second, you say in the narrative before the recipe that you can you arrowroot flour for a lighter crumb…do you mean the bread will not be as dense? Thank you, Thank you for your recipes….I’m on to try the ravioli’s for tomorrow nights dinner…


Mine had a distinct ammonia scent, which I noticed from the comments was an issue for a few other posters as well. My research tells me not enough acid in my batch to neutralize the soda. I may have left it a bit too long in my processor because my coconut oil was lumpy and I was trying to break it up. It tastes a bit like Irish soda bread, which is not my favorite. I’m thinking of experimenting with baking powder instead to suit my personal preference.
For instance, the fat allowance of the diet may be problematic. “My biggest hang-up with the paleo diet is all of the saturated fats it promotes with all of the meats,” explains Holley, noting that you could look for a locally sourced meat, whose origin and method of raising you're aware of, as a healthier option. Saturated fat from meat has been linked with an increased risk of early death. (9)
Hi Winston! If you use the recommended size baking pan, the bread will be the proper height. If you use a pan that is bigger than the one I used, your bread will rise, but it won’t fill the pan to the right height. Here’s an example that might help –if you place 1/2 cup of water in a 1/2 measuring cup it will be 100% full to the top of the cup. If you put the same 1/2 cup of water in a 1 cup measuring cup it will only fill it 50% and will only be 1/2 full in height. That’s why a loaf pan that is too large doesn’t work for this recipe when it comes to the bread “rising” and the height of the loaf :-) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=esJSqaaoibA
This bread, I guess you could say, has more of a “cake-y” texture than a real “bread-y” feel to it: it’s really soft and moist, kind of like a heavy pound cake, perhaps, but one that would be savory. Not an unpleasant texture at all, if you ask me, and it’s so crazy tasty and more-ish, you soon get to thinking that you’d much rather be eating this than any old piece of traditional bread.

I am currently looking for a recipe to try in my recently acquired, but not-yet-used silicone challah mold (https://www.amazon.com/Amazing-Perfect-Silicone-Bakeware-Braiding/dp/B005NAGY8O). Our family eats gluten-free, with a strong leaning towards a whole foods/Paleo diet. My husband and I are happy to enjoy a Shabbat dinner sans challah, though our 8- and 5-year-old daughters are very disappointed (especially when we are at synagogue and we ask them not to have any of the challah) to be missing out. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NIq35QNJlPs


By far my favorite bread recipe! It turned out golden brown with a great flavor! Super easy and basic ingredients so you don’t have to run to the supermarket before making it. I asked my husband (not paleo or gluten free) to taste it and he thought it was good. That’s quite a compliment because he dislikes most gluten free/paleo things. Just a note, I’m at 9300 feet above sea level and it still raised and turned out delicious! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DDWirPJv8Qg

Thank you for taking care of us who need your recipes! I recently found out that tapioca comes from the cassava plant and that is where they get cyanide from, so I know longer eat it and found out that I was allergic to it. If its not refined enough, it is a problem for many people who eat it and don’t know why they don’t feel good. You might want to consider not using it or xanthan gum or guar gum in any of your recipes either. They come from Pakistan and India and cause stomach distress in many people as they are a bean. Guar gum is used in oil fracking so it’s really not a great ingredient to be putting into food either!
I suggest blending the almond/sunflower seed butter with the honey FIRST, before adding the other wet ingredients. I also mix the salt in during that step. I blend (hand mixer) after adding each egg. Doing so helps prevent pockets of saltiness in your final product (esp. if you’re using a large crystal salt, like gray Celtic sea salt), and also keeps the honey from sinking to the bottom during mixing. The sunflower seed batter was very smooth and easy to portion out. Again, I love this recipe! Thanks so much for it!
One question, when I released this bread out of the pan there was a very strong ammonia smell coming from the bread. After it cooled this ammonia smell was gone. I’m just curious what could cause that odor? Is it a reaction from the almond flour? I was just caught off guard when I bent over to get a whiff of the freshly baked loaf and it smelled of ammonia! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OxF2u_3URxs

Hahaha. That’s why we’re besties. We staunchly refuse to follow the times. ???? Now what’s this all about floral curtains? Do you have a set picked out for me? Lolol. I’ve never tried Justin’s vanilla AB. But now I’m super intrigued! Yes on the overheating–AB takes a lot longer than you would think. I will label at least 100 of these cookies for you. 😉 Love ya more! <3 <3 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FHhthf8B-xk

thank you for prompt reply. I do hope it tastes better than other low carb bread I’ve made and thrown out because I dislike the taste and sometimes it was too wet. It looks great so will try and report back. I must find something I like as at the moment am tucking into “normal” bread and that’s not good for my wastline or my diabetes. Thanks for the inspiring recipes.
I made the amended version of this yesterday (in the Parrish pan) and it turned out great. I have an oven thermometer that confirmed the 350-degree oven temperature, but the bread took another ten minutes (40 altogether) in the oven before it toothpick-tested done. Testing for doneness this way is nothing more than I would expect of any kind of baking. The bread tastes wonderful. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=REgtM8mvAsY
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