Hi! I’ve been looking for a good paleo bread substitute recipe lately and this one looks perfect and then some! I was just wondering if it’s lower in calories than regular bread as I’ve been trying to watch my calorie intake recently and I know almond flour is a little higher than regular flour. Does anyone happen to know what the calorie count is for one loaf? Thanks in advance! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ST7DrKyjPRY
Getting the grains out is pretty much the top priority when you make a bread that is Paleo approved. That’s what we’re seeing here is the use of coconut flour instead of wheat-based flour. You’re going to get a milky taste from this because they’ve used almond milk, and a creamy taste because there’s cashew butter. This should give the bread a smoothness that you won’t find with other breads on the list, which might make it preferable to some, and others may prefer the other types made out of almond flour or that contain flax meal.
When you are separating the eggs if you use the method of pouring the egg from one half of the shell to the other you have to be extremely careful because the sharp shell can easily break the yolk. There are tools that you can purchase that will cradle the yolk and let the white run into a separate bowl. Or, you can use your hands. You need to make sure that your hands are extremely clean and fresh from being washed. Break the egg into one hand and let the white slip between your slightly separate fingers. The yolk will settle into your hand and the white will slip off into the bowl.
Coconut flour is a great alternative when you need to avoid almond flour because of a nut allergy, or for any other reason. With a couple easy tips, coconut flour can also yield delicious gluten free baked goods. Coconut flour is very high in fiber and subsequently absorbs a lot of liquid, so as a general rule, it’s recommended to use the coconut flour and liquid at the same ratio. Coconut flour can also result in very dense and/or dry and crumbly baked goods, so it’s important not to use too much coconut flour, and to use other ingredients to lighten the texture. This is why a lot of recipes that call for coconut flour also call for a lot of eggs. However, then the issue is that the baked goods have an overly eggy taste. Because of this, I prefer to use coconut flour in conjunction with other paleo-friendly flours instead of using it on its own.
We did the same thing with sunflower sead butter in paleo bread the other day. We ran out of cashew butter (as the recipe called for) and filled in the final put with sunflower seed butter. Top half of the bread turned bright green! Some in the house wouldn’t eat it, but I loved it! And it was pretty cool when we looked up why it happened. Excited to try this recipe, thanks for sharing!
I just made a loaf of this last night. I followed the recipe to a T since it was the first time making. It has a very nice flavor but I would not regard it as an ideal sandwich bread. It has the texture of a light banana bread and even using a smaller loaf pan it made a tiny loaf, didn’t rise much. This is a good bread for toast but it is drier on the ends of the loaf and crumbles easily. I think if I were to make again I might use 1 and 1/2 the quantities listed and I would only bake for 30 minutes.
Hi V. Not all my recipes need nuts or almond flour, but most my baked goods do. This is because almond flour gives the best texture. If your son is allergic to nuts I would suggest substituting the nuts for seeds, and the almond flour for pumpkin or sunflower seed flour. You can also try using a gluten-free oats flours. I haven’t made this substitution in many of my recipes, but it’s worth a try. Please let me know how it goes.
Divya, I’m happy to hear the flavor was great, but sorry to hear the bread was flat! I’ll try to help you troubleshoot…first I would check to make sure that your baking powder is fresh. Also, did you use the full cup of egg whites? Did you use a 9 by 5-inch loaf pan? Did you cook it at 350F and is your oven properly calibrated? Did you bake it for the amount of time the recipe calls for?
Sweden's Staffan Lindeberg has a home page Paleolithic Diet in Medical Nutrition [archive.org]. A recent study of Staffan's has A Paleolithic diet improving glucose tolerance more than a Mediterranean-like diet in individuals with ischemic heart disease. Also see his first web page, an overview of his Kitava study: On the Benefits of Ancient Diets. Now he has a book Food and Western Disease: Health and nutrition from an evolutionary perspective. Here's a book review: Easy to Read, Informative, Packed with Footnotes on Studies.
Is there any place to get organic almond flour–and please don’t talk about Bob’s Red Mills. Most of their products are NOT organic and that includes their almond flour. I am pretty disciplined about not using chemically grown food. Also, since most American almonds come from California there is the added concern about whether they are watered with waste water from oil companies.

I’ve been following a gluten-free diet for two years now. I don’t adhere to a strictly Paleo diet but I use a lot of Paleo recipes I find on Pinterest. This is the first time I’ve ever left a comment or feedback. After enduring many labor-intensive, gluten-free and Paleo bread recipes, I have found my go-to! This is SO simple with a WONDERFUL taste and texture! I don’t keep flax on hand so I use sweet sorghum flour (I realize that’s not Paleo but it works for me.) I also add a packet of quick rise yeast simply because I like yeast flavor. I turn my oven on the lowest temp and set the batter on top of the stove for an hour and it does rise nicely. There’s no need to wait if you’re not looking for it to rise. The hands on time is just as the recipe indicates-minutes! I also just realized that the Paleo casserole dish I had intended to make for dinner tonight (and have already made several times) is from the same source and is DELICIOUS and healthy, comfort food! Thank you Kaylie for the simple, fantastic recipes!


A diet high in phytic acid, which can be found in whole grains (it's in the bran) and beans like soy, is very detrimental for mineral absorption. Phytic acid strongly binds to minerals like calcium, iron, zinc and magnesium to form insoluble salts, phytates, which precipitate from the body and are not absorbed. Staffan Lindeberg has written a summary on phytic acid.
My bread came out a teeny bit “eggy”…which wasn’t bad, I still enjoyed it. Maybe some egg yolk made it in the batter??? Anyway, the slight egginess made me think of French toast. So with the last few pieces, that’s what I made. I mixed an egg, heavy cream, and a little vanilla to coat the bread…used browned butter to sub for syrup…then topped off with Swerve confectioners sugar. It was delicious!
Autoimmunity is a process in which our bodies own immune system attacks “us.” Normally the immune system protects us from bacterial, viral, and parasitic infections. The immune system identifies a foreign invader, attacks it, and ideally clears the infection. A good analogy for autoimmunity is the case of tissue rejection after organ donation. If someone requires a new heart, lung kidney or liver due to disease or injury, a donor organ may be an option. The first step in this process is trying to find a tissue “match”. All of us have molecules in our tissues that our immune system uses to recognize self from non-self. If a donated organ is not close enough to the recipient in tissue type the immune system will attack and destroy the organ. In autoimmunity, a similar process occurs in that an individuals own tissue is confused as something foreign and the immune system attacks this “mislabeled” tissue. Common forms of autoimmunity include Multiple Sclerosis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Lupus, and Vitiligo to name only a tiny fraction of autoimmune diseases. Elements of autoimmunity are likely at play in conditions as seemingly unrelated as Schizophrenia, infertility, and various forms of cancer. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0A-WD-kz-o4
Hi Becky! If you use the recommended size baking pan, the bread will be the proper height and you will be able to use it for sandwiches. If you use a pan that is bigger than the one I used, your bread won’t fill the pan up. Here’s an example –if you place 1/2 cup of water in a 1/2 measuring cup it will be 100% full to the top of the cup. If you put the same 1/2 cup of water in a 1 cup measuring cup it will only fill it 50% and will only be 1/2 full in height. That’s why a loaf pan that is too large doesn’t work for this recipe when it comes to the height of the loaf :-)
I made the amended version of this yesterday (in the Parrish pan) and it turned out great. I have an oven thermometer that confirmed the 350-degree oven temperature, but the bread took another ten minutes (40 altogether) in the oven before it toothpick-tested done. Testing for doneness this way is nothing more than I would expect of any kind of baking. The bread tastes wonderful.
Hi, I made this bread a couple of days ago, and the flavor was Amazing!! A tad sweet, I may use less honey next time, but very very good. I separated the egg whites and blended with hand mixer until stiff peaks formed, and then folded them into the rest of the batter. Originally the bread came out high like I wanted, but then by the following day had condensed down and was a heavier bread like zucchini bread. Next time I may slice and freeze right away, and then take single pieces out to toast. This bread was so easy to slice, even into very thin pieces, which I was amazed at. Overall a great recipe. Would probably be good with dried cranberries or blueberries and black walnuts :) for a dessert bread. My grandma, who doesn’t normally eat paleo, LOVED this bread!! THank you for taking out the hard work for us in making great paleo recipes.
The Paleolithic or “Paleo” diet seeks to address 21st century ills by revisiting the way humans ate during the Paleolithic era more than 2 million years ago. Paleo proponents state that because our genetics and anatomy have changed very little since the Stone Age, we should eat foods available during that time to promote good health. Our predecessors used simple stone tools that were not advanced enough to grow and cultivate plants, so they hunted, fished, and gathered wild plants for food. If they lived long enough, they were believed to experience less modern-day diseases like diabetes, cancer, and heart disease because of a consistent diet of lean meats and plant foods along with a high level of physical activity from intensive hunting. However, the life expectancy of our predecessors was only a fraction of that of people today. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S4j4JsvIvaQ
Thank you so much for all the work you do on recipes. I had been craving – really really craving – a sandwich. Somehow, having a sandwich, even more than having a pizza, or a piece of cake or pie, seems “normal” to me. So, I finally got all the ingredients, and made your bread. I used egg whites and a couple of whole eggs, and they ended up being more liquid that you used, so I had to leave the bread in the oven quite a bit longer than 30 minutes. But when it came out, and finally cooled, I had a sandwich. Thank you so much.
i loved this recipe! my bread did not rise like yours did although i used the recommended pan size. maybe because i used bob’s red mill meal/flour and my eggs were straight out of the fridge. those were the only two factors i could think of. anyways, the bread was delicious and i have longed for bread while following paleo plans. thanks, and i will continue to search for the flour that you recommend and allow my eggs to warm up a bit prior to my next loaf. i will let you know how that worked out.
You’ll stay pretty full on the Paleo diet. Nutrition experts emphasize the importance of satiety, the satisfied feeling that you’ve had enough. You shouldn’t feel hungry on this diet – protein and fiber are filling, and you’ll get plenty of both. One small study of 29 participants published in Nutrition & Metabolism in 2010 found Paleo dieters felt just as full but consumed fewer calories than their Mediterranean counterparts.
Our hefty cousins, the apes, spend half their waking hours gnawing on raw sustenance, about six hours per day. In contrast, we spend only one hour. “So in a sense, cooking opens up this space for other activities,” says Pollan. “It’s very hard to have culture, it’s very hard to have science, it’s very hard to have all the things we count as important parts of civilization if you’re spending half of all your waking hours chewing.” Cooked food: It gave us civilization.
Five roots, both bitter and sweet, are staples in the Hiwi diet, as are palm nuts and palm hearts, several different fruits, a wild legume named Campsiandra comosa, and honey produced by several bee species and sometimes by wasps. A few Hiwi families tend small, scattered and largely unproductive fields of plantains, corn and squash. At neighboring cattle ranches in a town about 30 kilometers away, some Hiwi buy rice, noodles, corn flour and sugar. Anthropologists and tourists have also given the Hiwi similar processed foods as gifts (see illustration at top).

Still, many scientists have expressed concern that we do not yet have enough evidence to make any strong claims about the paleo diet’s health benefits, especially its long-term effects. In fact, in an article in response to the first review, authors Tanis R. Fenton and Carol J. Fenton, from the Cumming School of Medicine in Canada, wrote a letter to the editor in which they expressed their disappointment with the review. (5)
Some randomized controlled trials have shown the Paleo diet to produce greater short-term benefits than diets based on national nutrition guidelines, including greater weight loss, reduced waist circumference, decreased blood pressure, increased insulin sensitivity, and improved cholesterol. However these studies were of short duration (6 months or less) with a small number of participants (less than 40). [4-6]
I wanted to say thank you for the recipe. I made it today with my Vitamix. I used whole raw almonds and whole flax seed that I ground up in the Vitamix in batches rather than almond flour and flaxseed meal. I substituted two single serving packages of stevia for the honey and mixed everything in the Vitamix. My bread turned out great and tastes wonderful. The almond skins and stevia changed the color a little from the picture on the web site but my loaf still looks good (lighter crust and darker interior). (I used 1.5 cups of whole almonds, 2 tablespoons coconut flour, ¼ cup of whole flaxseeds, ¼ teaspoon salt, 1.5 teaspoons baking soda, 5 large eggs, ¼ cup coconut oil, 2 packets of stevia, and 1 tablespoon of apple cider vinegar in the Magic Loaf Pan.) Thanks again.
I made this bread today using the same exact ingredients and baked it for 25 minutes, edges were brown, toothpick inserted in the center came out clean. It looked great and smelled wonderful. Unfortunately when I tried removing from pan after it cooled, it fell apart. It was not cooked at all in the center. 🙁 I thought I finally found a good bread recipe that came out perfect the first time! Not sure what I did wrong.
Just made this bread tonight and I love the texture. I am still deciding on the taste. It reminds me of cornbread which isn’t a bad thing, necessarily. I think when I make an actual sandwich out of it I will not even notice the difference. Also thinking it could be good for a casserole of some sort. We also had your Chipotle Orange Chicken and that was a big hit! I am loving this site, a huge THANK YOU!
The information on this website has not been evaluated by the Food & Drug Administration or any other medical body. We do not aim to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any illness or disease. Information is shared for educational purposes only. You must consult your doctor before acting on any content on this website, especially if you are pregnant, nursing, taking medication or have a medical condition. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cz_7K_r05rA
Stacey thank you for that, I am trying out keto stuffing for Thanksgiving. Paola thank you for this recipe. I have made it twice. First time was a bit slimy as I didn’t grind my flours (lesson learned). 2nd one was perfection. My bread rises wonderfully. I put it out in my garage or on my back porch to rise…of course Yuma Arizona gives me a warmth advantage. Not sure how it will work in winter.

Autoimmunity is a process in which our bodies own immune system attacks “us.” Normally the immune system protects us from bacterial, viral, and parasitic infections. The immune system identifies a foreign invader, attacks it, and ideally clears the infection. A good analogy for autoimmunity is the case of tissue rejection after organ donation. If someone requires a new heart, lung kidney or liver due to disease or injury, a donor organ may be an option. The first step in this process is trying to find a tissue “match”. All of us have molecules in our tissues that our immune system uses to recognize self from non-self. If a donated organ is not close enough to the recipient in tissue type the immune system will attack and destroy the organ. In autoimmunity, a similar process occurs in that an individuals own tissue is confused as something foreign and the immune system attacks this “mislabeled” tissue. Common forms of autoimmunity include Multiple Sclerosis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Lupus, and Vitiligo to name only a tiny fraction of autoimmune diseases. Elements of autoimmunity are likely at play in conditions as seemingly unrelated as Schizophrenia, infertility, and various forms of cancer. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0A-WD-kz-o4


Alyssa, one more thing. Both the bowl and the beaters need to be spotlessly clean. If there is one hint of oil anywhere the whites will not beat properly. Nicole is correct about not using a plastic bowl. Plastic will even absorb oil to say nothing of the microscopic amounts that get into the surface when it’s scratched. When baking it is always best to use a metal or glass bowl for all of your mixing. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7gZZpXmG2MU
Can you put any yeast in the mixture? And if you did, would it help it rise more in addition to tasing more “yeasty”? I have been making (with great results) a browner, wheat colored bread from a recipe called Diedre’s For Real Low Carb Bread. It uses yeast and only has one rise after kneading with my dough hook attachment on my mixer. I would like to try some white bread.

Yes, if you bake this as muffins you will need to adjust the cooking time. If it’s a regular oven, start checking it around 15 min, if you have a convection oven, start checking them around 12 min. Also the size of your muffin tins will affect the outcome so if yours are smaller, just keep an eye on them and when they smell good and look done, start testing them with a toothpick. If it comes out clean, they are done.
However, I’ve made the Paleo bread twice and the same thing happened both times. The inside of the bread developed a huge hole and was not cooked. I’ve made the Paleo Pumpkin bread five times and had no problems, which makes me ask: since the Pumpkin bread bakes for 45 minutes, could there be a typo in this recipe and perhaps the bread should bake longer than 30 minutes?
Hello! I was wondering if you had ever doubled or tripled the recipe in order to use a standard size loaf pan? I wasn’t paying attention to the size and made a regular recipe in a standard loaf pan and the results were, well, flat. Then I realized my goof. Hoping to avoid the purchase of another pan, but will definitely buy a new one if it means I can make this bread! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d0Zz6z5GaVE
YUM! I am going into week 3 of Paleo and missed bread. This is yummy although I need I smaller pan because it’s short. Not that that matters, I eat it alone or with grass-fed butter anyway! 🙂 I did have flax seeds, just the ground flax. And I used coconut oil (not butter) and coconut cream. It came out great! I cooked it for 35 minutes because even though the toothpick came out clean, it still didn’t “look” done. 35 minutes was perfect! Thanks for the recipe!
Begin by making your filling, this has a jam consistency. In a medium saucepan, combine raspberries, honey, lemon juice and lemon zest. Heat to a medium to medium high heat, until mixture begins to bubble. Let bubble for 1-2 minutes, then lower heat to a simmer. While simmering, be sure to mash the berries with a wooden spoon. Cook for an additional 2-3 minutes, remove from heat. Add in chia seeds. Let cool for 5-10 minutes before transferring to a glass jar or dish, and place in the fridge to cool completely. This will take about 1 hour, but you can also make the filling and let sit overnight.
Thank you so much! I didn’t have any flax for the first couple of batches, so subbed extra almond flour, then made it my bread machine and it was a hit. But for this batch, I doubled to make two loaves using the ground golden flax and baked it in the oven, and it was even better!!! My son who has celiacs loves it. This is a godsend with school lunches coming up again.
Hi, I’ve made this recipe twice and LOVE the taste. However, both times the bread would rise so high in the oven, but as soon as I take it out to cool it deflated and middle sink down. What could’ve gone wrong? Over mixing? I did switch coconut flour to all almond flour instead. Could that be a problem? Please help as I’m anxious to make another batch. Thank you.

The rationale for the Paleolithic diet derives from proponents' claims relating to evolutionary medicine.[22] Advocates of the diet state that humans were genetically adapted to eating specifically those foods that were readily available to them in their local environments. These foods therefore shaped the nutritional needs of Paleolithic humans. They argue that the physiology and metabolism of modern humans have changed little since the Paleolithic era.[23] Natural selection is a long process, and the cultural and lifestyle changes introduced by western culture have occurred quickly. The argument is that modern humans have therefore not been able to adapt to the new circumstances.[24] The agricultural revolution brought the addition of grains and dairy to the diet.[25] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oRafxW1OaUc
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