The Hiwi gather and hunt a diverse group of plants and animals from the savannas, forests, rivers and swamps. Their main sources of meat are capybara, collared peccary, deer, anteater, armadillo, and feral cattle, numerous species of fish, and at least some turtle species. Less commonly consumed animals include iguanas and savanna lizards, wild rabbits, and many birds. Not exactly the kind of meat Paleo dieters and others in urban areas can easily obtain.
I am new to walking the Primal path, but was already missing bread and sandwiches. Thanks so much for this recipe. I made it today and it came out great. After reading all the reviews about the center not baking, I inserted my oven thermometer into the center of the loaf after 25 minutes of baking. Then I set the thermometer to alarm when it reached 195 degrees F. (That is halfway between the 190 degrees I use for white bread and 200 degrees I use for banana bread.) The center was nicely baked. Hopefully this will help others who try this recipe.

The paleo diet is meant to mimic what our preagricultural, hunter-gatherer ancestors ate. The premise is that the current Western diet is contributing to the rise of chronic diseases such as obesity, heart disease and cancer. This diet, paleo proponents claim, can reduce inflammation, improve workouts, increase energy, help with weight loss, stabilize blood sugar and even reduce the risk of chronic diseases.
Similarly, any foods that were not easily available to Paleolithic humans are off-limits in this diet, Holley explains. That means processed foods — many of which contain added butter, margarine, and sugar — should not be a part of the paleo diet. The same goes for dairy, which may not have been accessible to Paleolithic humans, and legumes, which many proponents of the diet believe are not easily digestible by the body.

Thank you Elana for posting such a delishious bread recipe. I followed the recipe as originally posted, but I didn’t feel there was enough batter, so I made another batch and added it to the first. The only change was I added aprox. 1 tsp. of cream of tartar. I used unpasturized dark honey, but next time I will only use 1 TBS. instead of the 2 for when I double the recipe. I think 1 TBS. will be plenty enough. I also baked the loaf a little longer until it was browned because of it’s thickness. Out of the grain free breads I have experimented with in baking, this one is definately the best. The taste and texture completed my ham and cucumber sandwich.


Oh my GOSH!! It’s REAL bread! My poor little guys (okay, and me too) have really been struggling since going gluten free for the third time (this time we went Paleo and it has finally resolved their symptoms and as a side note resolved mine, though I didn’t realize in the beginning I had a gluten problem). My son and I are oohing and ahhing in my kitchen right now over this bread. I’d given up on the difficult task of making gluten free bread when the first several complicated recipes I tried were gross and gritty. I did not have high hopes for yet another bread recipe, nevertheless one that would fit into our Paleo diet, but this is seriously amazing and it was fast and easy to make in my Vitamix. Moist and delicious, we decided we had to make some quick strawberry jam to celebrate this delicious occasion. Thank you, thank you for giving my boys (and me!!) our bread back!!! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pr9Ogyiw4AA
Another great recipe! So quick and so easy and so delicious! I used normal ground almonds, so the texture is more coarse and the bread turned out a darker than on Adriana’s pictures. I used coconut oil instead of butter and as I didn’t have enough arrowroodpowder at home I made half the amount and made muffins instead of a bread loaf. The baking time can be reduced to approx. 15 min. when making muffins.They turned out really fantastic, fluffy, moist and if you like the taste of coconut you should definitely make them with coconut oil instead of butter 🙂 I also love, that there’s no sugar involved! Thanks for sharing this recipe with us!
I tried this recipe (delicious, btw) substituting sunflower meal for flax meal (in the middle of hurricane Sandy and had no flax), and the bread turned green… SO glad that someone else experienced this and it was answered. Thank you! That helps. It didn’t rise as much as I hoped – maybe it was because of the substitution…? In either case, thank you for this fantastic recipe! My husband and I loved it.
this looks amazing! i am low carb, so this will work for me as opposed to some of your other gluten free breads! i cant have arrowroot powder and other similar ingredients. that being said, i love ALL your recipes and even if they contain ingredients i cant have, they are usually easy to substitute or ‘play’ around with until i get it low carb friendly;) thankfully, you have done the work for me here;)thanks!!!!!
WOW! This bread is amazing! I have Gestational Diabetes, and have been struggling with bread since it has been spiking my sugars. Normally I don’t each much of it, but I was just craving it today. So I made a loaf and it is delicious! I went through the comments because I only have a full size loaf pan, and did as someone else mentioned, increased the recipe by .5 (for the eggs did 8 eggs rather than 7), and it came out the perfect size and absolutely delicious. Looking forward to enjoying it the rest of the week. I used a glass full size loaf and cooked for 40 minutes at 350 degrees. I topped it with extra flax seeds because I too love the nutty flavor of flax.
Wow! I really admire your baking skills back then (and now too)! I’ve never made homemade almond butter before, but it’s on my list to do so. Sounds like you were overflowing with ALL of the food! Mmm and nice cream, I do love that and it’s been way too long since I’ve had some. You are the queen of no-bake recipes, Demeter! I’m loving that these gorgeous bars are just four ingredients. You really can’t get much easier (or more delicious!) than this. Pinning these beauties and can’t wait to make them. I’m love the chocolate and almond butter combo! Hope your week is off to a great start!
Evolution of the Human Diet: The Known, the Unknown, and the Unknowable by Peter S. Ungar. Diet is key to understanding the ecology and evolution of our distant ancestors and their kin, the early hominins. A study of the range of foods eaten by our progenitors underscores just how unhealthy many of our diets are today. This volume brings together authorities from disparate fields to offer new insights into the diets of our ancestors. Paleontologists, archaeologists, primatologists, nutritionists and other researchers all contribute pieces to the puzzle. The book has four sections: Reconstructed diets based on hominin fossils--tooth size, shape, structure, wear, and chemistry, mandibular biomechanics. Archaeological evidence of subsistence--stone tools and modified bones. Models of early hominin diets based on the diets of living primates--both human and non-human, paleoecology, and energetics. Nutritional analyses and their implications for evolutionary medicine. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LssXGFdueFM
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