Hi Erma, to keep my recipes grain-free you can substitute sunflower or pumpkin seed flour for the almond flour cup for cup. The taste is a little different but you may still really like it. These seed flour may be hard to find so you can make your own and the process is the same for making almond flour. I have a tutorial here: https://livinghealthywithchocolate.com/desserts/how-to-blanch-almonds-and-make-almond-flour-8387/

Our keto bread recipe has a beautiful golden crust. It has great structure with a lovely rise and perfect bread-like crumb. It slices well for sandwiches or toasting, but you don’t have to toast or grill it to make it taste good. Sliced with a smear of salted butter is keto perfection. And it actually tastes like bread, not eggs or almonds or coconut. Additionally, this bread will keep well wrapped in the fridge for up to a week!
When I tried this yesterday, it didn’t bake all the way, specifically most of the center was still raw. So after eating what was edible and tossing the rest (how do you do that btw, I always feel so bad throwing away the unfavorable outcomes…) I tweaked it as follows, went back today and now it’s great! I substituted 1 tsp baking powder and 1/2 tsp baking soda for the baking soda and baked it in the preheated oven at 325° for about 55 min. Thanks Elana for your hard work! Keep it up, it’s highly appreciated!
Love, love, love! I make a double batch and freeze them with great results. I toast these rolls for all kinds of sandwiches including toasted with bacon, egg, avocado for breakfast. Recently I started sprinkling Trader Joe’s Everything but the Bagel Sesame Seasoning Blend on the tops before baking. Toasted with butter is a great substitute for bagels or hard rolls. Thank you Lexi for such a great recipe! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iuUucqQDQ7o
I made the amended version of this yesterday (in the Parrish pan) and it turned out great. I have an oven thermometer that confirmed the 350-degree oven temperature, but the bread took another ten minutes (40 altogether) in the oven before it toothpick-tested done. Testing for doneness this way is nothing more than I would expect of any kind of baking. The bread tastes wonderful.

One larger randomized controlled trial followed 70 post-menopausal Swedish women with obesity for two years, who were placed on either a Paleo diet or a Nordic Nutrition Recommendations (NNR) diet. [7] The Paleo diet provided 30% of total calories from protein, 40% fat (from mostly monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats) and 30% carbohydrates. It included lean meats, fish, eggs, vegetables, fruits, berries, nuts, avocado, and olive oil. The NNR diet provided less protein and fat but more carbohydrate with 15% protein, 25-30% fat, and 55-60% carbohydrates, including foods similar to the Paleo diet but also low-fat dairy products and high-fiber grains. Both groups significantly decreased fat mass and weight circumference at 6 and 24 months, with the Paleo diet producing greater fat loss at 6 months but not at 24 months. Triglyceride levels decreased more significantly with the Paleo diet at 6 and 24 months than the NNR diet.
We cannot time travel and join our Paleo ancestors by the campfire as they prepare to eat; likewise, shards of ancient pottery and fossilized teeth can tell us only so much. If we compare the diets of so-called modern hunter-gatherers, however, we see just how difficult it is to find meaningful commonalities and extract useful dietary guidelines from their disparate lives (see infographic). Which hunter–gatherer tribe are we supposed to mimic, exactly? How do we reconcile the Inuit diet—mostly the flesh of sea mammals—with the more varied plant and land animal diet of the Hadza or !Kung? Chucking the many different hunter–gather diets into a blender to come up with some kind of quintessential smoothie is a little ridiculous. "Too often modern health problems are portrayed as the result of eating 'bad' foods that are departures from the natural human diet…This is a fundamentally flawed approach to assessing human nutritional needs," Leonard wrote. "Our species was not designed to subsist on a single, optimal diet. What is remarkable about human beings is the extraordinary variety of what we eat. We have been able to thrive in almost every ecosystem on the Earth, consuming diets ranging from almost all animal foods among populations of the Arctic to primarily tubers and cereal grains among populations in the high Andes.” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ogf0TuIpffg
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If you were to eat an unlimited amount of red meat (which the paleo diet technically allows), you may see your heart health suffer. While experts applaud the omission of packaged and processed foods like cake, cookies, chips, and candy — which are well known to be bad for your ticker — they’re not crazy about the fact that paleo doesn’t allow you to eat whole grains, legumes, and most dairy. Whole grains in particular have been linked with better cholesterol levels, as well as a reduced risk of stroke, obesity, and type 2 diabetes. (13) These are all comorbidities of heart disease. (14) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L8cvENxm6dQ
As you might expect from the previous paragraph, eating plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables naturally leads to higher fiber intake. Dietary fiber is essential for good health, and despite what you’ve probably heard, whole grains aren’t the place to find it. Non-starchy vegetables contain eight times more fiber than whole grains and 31 times more fiber than refined grains. Even fruits contain twice as much fiber as whole grains and seven times more fiber than refined grains!

LOREN CORDAIN, Ph.D., is one of the top global researchers in the area of evolutionary medicine. Generally acknowledged as the world's leading expert on the Paleolithic diet, he is a professor in the Health and Exercise Science Department at Colorado State University. Dr. Cordain and his research have been featured on Dateline NBC and in the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, and other media. He is the author of The Paleo Diet and The Paleo Diet Cookbook, among other books, and makes regular media and speaking appearances worldwide.


This bread is perfect for everyday use. I have tried a number of grain-free and gluten-free breads, but this is the absolute best recipe I have found BY FAR. I had to adjust the baking temp and time to ensure the middle bakes (I’ve had a number of soggy-middle issues with this), but a baked for for 30min in a 355 oven, it is perfect. It’s a great, fast, easy way for my little girls to get the fat, protien and carbs their bodies need for breakfast. Topped with some preserves, and momma is all set too! Thanks so much!


I’m excited to hear that! If I have a chance to do any recipe testing myself, I will let you know if I come up with anything worthwhile . . .Staying tuned and looking forward to it! Is there any way for me to be notified of your replies to my comment(s)? I had to come back to this page to see this, so just wondering (and I do have the box clicked about “notify me of follow-up comments by email”). Thanks again!
Michele, this is the most delicious bread and can’t believe it’s paleo. So easy to make and keep. After a few days of keeping it out, I cut the rest into slices, put slice sized parchment paper between each one and freeze. I save the parchment for future loaves. Getting ready to make another one. It’s so delicious! Thank you for all your attempts to perfect it. YUM!! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Jh5J8BCUks
Chris Masterjohn has Cholesterol: Your Life Depends on It!, another web site pointing out that the war on cholesterol and the push to put people on statins is misguided. The site argues it is actually polyunsaturated fats, not saturated fats or cholesterol, that contribute to heart disease, cancer, liver damage, and aging. He also has a popular blog. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g5n68qEhqIM
Made this bread the other night and it is so wonderful!!.Love it slightly warmed with a pat of butter.My only problem is that it did not rise that much so can’t really use for a sandwich.My eggs were not fresh nor my refrigerated flaxseed meal..I used a glass loaf pan (buttered).I did cook at 350 degrees for the 30 min and it came out wonderful!!Thanks so much for the recipe.I love the recipes with honey and/or stevia, sucanat or rapadura. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RRCgH9ZQj2o
George–I agree with you re the Vital Wheat Gluten and Wheat Protein IsolateI am eating Chompies bread from Netrition and it is made with these same ingredients. A slice of this bread is one gram and it is delicious–but terribly expensive so I’ m planning on using your recipe! Did you use the same measurements as the recipe calls for with your substitutions?
The 2015–2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans continue to recognize the nutritional benefits of whole grains and recommend individuals make sure one-half of the grains they consume daily are whole grains. A 2016 meta-analysis of 45 cohort studies, published in The BMJ, looked at the relationship between whole grain consumption and the risk of various diseases including CVD and cancer.5 Researchers concluded that intake of whole grains is associated with a reduced risk of coronary heart disease, CVD, cancers, respiratory and infectious diseases, and diabetes. Furthermore, a 2017 study published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that when subjects consumed whole grains vs refined grains, inflammation was reduced.6

Hi! Was wondering if I could substitute corn or coconut flour? They are the only ones that sit well with me and I’ve begun to develop a nut intolerance. I also can’t have vinegar, and am worried about arrowroot because I haven’t had it before. I’m having a hard time finding bread recipes that I can use and I’m looking to utilize a bread machine also. Hope this finds you well and thanks for your help and insight. Your page is beautiful. ♡ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HvA68vYZtDE


But critics argue that the unlimited amount of red meat the paleo diet allows may have an adverse effect on heart health in people with diabetes, as research links eating red meat in excess to poor heart health. (11)  If you have diabetes and don’t moderate your red-meat intake, this could be a big problem, as people with diabetes are 2 times as likely to die of heart disease as people who do not have diabetes. (12)
Almond flour is often considered the “all purpose” flour of the paleo baking world. It’s used to make things like bread, cakes, and cookies with good results. The only caveat I have is that using almond flour alone can result in a dense baked good, so I typically use almond flour (or almond meal) in conjunction with arrowroot starch, tapioca flour, and/or flaxseed meal to lighten up the texture.
umm, hard to say what may have caused this to happen. A few things I can think of are the temperature in your oven, the other ingredients you used, and the way you measured them. It’s so hard to say. I’ve made this bread with Welbee’s so it’s not that. Are you using measuring spoons and cups? I think you should try again. If you can purchase an oven thermometer to make sure the temperature is where you want it during baking I would do that. Every oven is so different… Here’s one for $6.51 on Amazon http://amzn.to/1WcJ1tv. Also, when you use test your bread with the stick, be sure to insert it all the way in, and in a couple different places. Please let me know how it goes when you make it again. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C6x5GgSa5j8
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