I really wanted to keep this nut and seed paleo bread more on the seed side. Haha, you get my point. The only nut that is really involved is almond in the almond flour. The rest are seeds such as pumpkin seeds, chia seed, and poppyseed, which you can interchange with flax or sunflower seeds. Either way, it truly gives the bread a nutty flavor that’s not too heavy. Cool? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yrcSUhdBgtc
Early man didn’t have microwaves, but if they did they surely could have whipped up some of this Paleo bread. Sometimes you need or want bread in a hurry, like if you forgot to make it, or if you realize that a meal would be perfectly complete if it just had some bread to go with it. While there may not be any ancestral connection to our love of bread, it’s hard to argue that it’s become a staple of many diets, and really helps to satiate an appetite. But since it represents a part of the Neolithic time, bread isn’t truly Paleo even if it’s made with Paleo friendly ingredients.

While I haven’t made this recipe, I’ve used flaxmeal in a lot of muffin recipes, and on a occasion I’ve noticed those same gossamer-type strings after a few days. My best guess is it has something to do with flax, although I’m not sure what causes them to develop. Some recipes I use flaxmeal in never develop the strings, and some do, but it definitely only happens in breads where I use flaxmeal. I think the food is still safe to eat though! I wish I knew exactly what causes it too… https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_sE-LIUjxog
Made with peanut butter instead of almond butter because that’s what I had. I could taste the coconut (which I like), but I will try substituting butter for the coconut oil next time (or half butter half coconut oil), as I am trying to find a good sandwich bread recipe for my picky 5 year old. It’s like a banana bread consistency, but when lightly toasted with butter, reminds me of regular wheat bread. Delicious, and will definitely make again! Thank you for the recipe! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xHkBH4yg0Co
The vinegar, when added last, gives the bread the rise. Often, Russian recipes call for baking soda and vinegar to give the rise (air pockets) you would normally get from yeast. I’m assuming, based on what I’ve read, that ACV has more health benefits, and a slightly different taste. I just took my bread out of the oven and it rose beautifully. Similar breads I’ve made called for less wet ingredients and were much denser. I can’t wait to cut this baby open and take a peek.
In fact, the health benefits of the paleo diet are unproven. "Our ancestors ate this way and didn't have many of the chronic diseases we do, but that doesn't mean the food they ate is the reason why; drawing that conclusion would be like saying we live three times longer than our Paleolithic ancestors because we eat fast food," says Christopher Ochner, MD, research associate at the New York Obesity Nutrition Research Center at St. Luke's and Roosevelt Hospitals. Still, a handful of small studies have tried to determine if a paleo diet is a healthier diet. One small study published in the journal Diabetologia found that the diet improved blood sugar over 12 weeks compared to a Mediterranean one that allowed grains, low-fat dairy, and oils, but it's hard to say whether researchers would come to the same results in a larger study.
Christina, I haven’t tried with cassava flour in this recipe, and it’s actually one flour I haven’t worked much with, so I’m not sure if it would yield a similar result without making other adjustments to the recipe (for example, certain flours absorb liquid differently). If you decide to experiment with the recipe using cassava flour, please let me know how it turns out!
This is a lovely, easy to make, dense bread. I really enjoyed it. I do not own a magic line pan but I purchased a “medium” sized bread pan and it seemed to work well. The bread may have come out a bit short though… I made this to use as sandwich bread in my son’s lunches. It is a bit denser than I was anticipating but it really tastes good. I just had a slice with jam and it’s filling too. This would be great as a sweet bread :). Thank you!
As of 2016 there are limited data on the metabolic effects on humans eating a Paleo diet, but the data are based on clinical trials that have been too small to have a statistical significance sufficient to allow the drawing of generalizations.[3][6][20][not in citation given] These preliminary trials have found that participants eating a paleo nutrition pattern had better measures of cardiovascular and metabolic health than people eating a standard diet,[3][9] though the evidence is not strong enough to recommend the Paleo diet for treatment of metabolic syndrome.[9] As of 2014 there was no evidence the paleo diet is effective in treating inflammatory bowel disease.[21]
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I love this recipe! This last time I made it, I split the dough into 6 rounds and baked it in my bun pan, making 6 “hamburger buns”. I like this size better than the loaf slices because I can get a more substantial sandwich. It held up great to a BBQ chicken sandwich as well as a simple almond butter and jelly sandwich… I think this will be my preferred way of baking the bread. Thanks for such a great recipe, Elana, I love it!
Wheat Belly: Lose the Wheat, Lose the Weight, and Find Your Path Back to Health by William Davis, MD. A renowned cardiologist explains how eliminating wheat from our diets can prevent fat storage, shrink unsightly "wheat belly" bulges, and reverse myriad health problems, like minor rashes and high blood sugar. The author contends that every single human will experience health improvement by giving up modern wheat. The book provides readers with a user-friendly, step-by-step plan to navigate a new, wheat-free lifestyle. Informed by cutting-edge science and nutrition, along with case studies from men and women who have experienced life-changing transformations in their health after waving goodbye to wheat. The author's blog. Published August 30, 2011.

It is interesting in gluten free baking how seemingly minute changes can have a big effect on the taste, texture, consistency and rise of the finished product. I thought it was just me that had such an enhanced palate (since I have Fibromyalgia, CFS, etc) my senses and nerves are forever enhanced. In my vanilla oat banana quick bread recipe I have found that variations in the type of pan etc will change the entire finished product. I have tried it in a large loaf pan, mini loaves and muffins. This recipe which I created works best as mini loaves. Just last week I made it and I used my nutri bullet instead of my food processor to ground the oat, corn meal and corn starch flour blend I created and it made for a very fine powder. This change in the texture of of the flour gave the bread a different texture. It was a slight change that only I would have noticed but I was going crazy trying to pinpoint what made the difference. I pinpointed that in order to get the rise and texture I prefer, I need to use mini loaf pans and pulse my blend in the food processor. I feel like these variations are part of all baking but pronounced in gf baking for sure.

Hi Anita, I double checked my carton egg whites. 3/4 cup of egg whites is equivalent to 4 large whole eggs, not 4 large egg whites. Mine has a chart for converting whole eggs, and the conversion for egg whites only is below the chart. It says 2 tablespoons of liquid egg whites are equivalent to the egg white of 1 whole egg. So, 12 large egg whites would be 24 tablespoons, or 1 1/2 cups as written in the recipe. Hope this helps!
Made this today. Came out perfectly! Hubby and son are grain free, and son has Autism which comes with food sensory issues and limited palate! My son liked this bread. It’s true that it’s not a standard slice like with traditional loaves made with wheat flour, but it’s big enough to make a sandwich still. Thanks for the great recipe! Tried to rate it but it won’t let me go up to 5 stars so rather than give you less, I’ll just not rate it officially. But….5 stars!!
Traditional lemon bars are so good, but that sugar high comes with a subsequent crash. That’s not the case with this Paleo-friendly version. Using honey instead of refined sugar keeps things sweet without throwing your blood sugar out of whack, while using coconut flour in the crust makes it perfectly crunchy. Make an extra batch because these will go quickly. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kkpOPq3GER8

Several examples of recent and relatively speedy human evolution underscore that our anatomy and genetics have not been set in stone since the stone age. Within a span of 7,000 years, for instance, people adapted to eating dairy by developing lactose tolerance. Usually, the gene encoding an enzyme named lactase—which breaks down lactose sugars in milk—shuts down after infancy; when dairy became prevalent, many people evolved a mutation that kept the gene turned on throughout life. Likewise, the genetic mutation responsible for blue eyes likely arose between 6,000 and 10,000 years ago. And in regions where malaria is common, natural selection has modified people's immune systems and red blood cells in ways that help them resist the mosquito-borne disease; some of these genetic mutations appeared within the last 10,000 or even 5,000 years. The organisms with which we share our bodies have evolved even faster, particularly the billions of bacteria living in our intestines. Our gut bacteria interact with our food in many ways, helping us break down tough plant fibers, but also competing for calories. We do not have direct evidence of which bacterial species thrived in Paleolithic intestines, but we can be sure that their microbial communities do not exactly match our own. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2lTSvNt_hZo
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