Hi, Kaylie. It’s yummy! I just made the bread and ate 4(!) slices before slicing and freezing the rest. I followed the recipe exactly, using the same ingredients, measurements, temp. and baking time. I was surprised by the size of the finished loaf. It measured 3 7/8″ wide by 2″ high. I can’t imagine making a sandwich with slices that size! That said, it tastes great, and has a very good texture. At 35 minutes, I used a toothpick to see if it was baked through. The toothpick came out clean, but on slicing it, I think I’ll give it a few more minutes when I make it again. Thanks for the recipe.
This is a complete list of foods not allowed on the paleo diet. It’s a sad day when you first have to say goodbye to these foods but, once you start, it’s much easier and you find there are even better paleo substitutes for these foods. The first few weeks might be tough, but if you stick with it over time, it’ll be worth it. We promise. Here’s the ultimate list of foods not allowed on the paleo diet.

But human populations in different regions of the world ate a variety of diets. Some ate more; some ate less. They likely ate meat only when they could get it, and then they gorged. Richard Wrangham, author of Catching Fire: How Cooking Made Us Human, says diets from around the world ranged greatly in the percentage of calories from meat. It’s not cooked meat that made us human, he says, but rather cooked food. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S2wGrYngpJ0
I notice that you call for Celtic sea salt in your recipes – any particular reason why you call for that over other kinds of salt – i.e., regular table salt, kosher salt, or other types of sea salts? I ask because I don’t have this particular salt at home, but have others, and don’t want to ruin the recipe(s) if the measurement conversions are different for fine ground vs. coarse, for instance….
Made with peanut butter instead of almond butter because that’s what I had. I could taste the coconut (which I like), but I will try substituting butter for the coconut oil next time (or half butter half coconut oil), as I am trying to find a good sandwich bread recipe for my picky 5 year old. It’s like a banana bread consistency, but when lightly toasted with butter, reminds me of regular wheat bread. Delicious, and will definitely make again! Thank you for the recipe! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xHkBH4yg0Co
Thank you so much for this recipe! I have tried so many paleo bread recipes and this is the best one yet. My husband devoured half of it and he’s a very picky eater. I’m going to double the recipe next time so I can use my larger bread pan. I do have one question though. Do you think this recipe would work if I added bananas, or blueberries? I was thinking of doing that but wasn’t sure if that would effect the consistency.
Coconut flour is a great alternative when you need to avoid almond flour because of a nut allergy, or for any other reason. With a couple easy tips, coconut flour can also yield delicious gluten free baked goods. Coconut flour is very high in fiber and subsequently absorbs a lot of liquid, so as a general rule, it’s recommended to use the coconut flour and liquid at the same ratio. Coconut flour can also result in very dense and/or dry and crumbly baked goods, so it’s important not to use too much coconut flour, and to use other ingredients to lighten the texture. This is why a lot of recipes that call for coconut flour also call for a lot of eggs. However, then the issue is that the baked goods have an overly eggy taste. Because of this, I prefer to use coconut flour in conjunction with other paleo-friendly flours instead of using it on its own.
Actually, I m not talking about Wheat flour. I suggested Vital Wheat Gluten and Wheat Protein Isolate. Which are low in carbs. Vital Wheat Gluten is 4g carbs per 1/4 cup and Wheat Protein Isolate is 2 to 3g per 1/4 cup. There is actually Low Carb bread being sold out there with these ingredients now. And, Oat Fiber actually has zero carbs. So, it is Keto. Especially, that you really don’t need to use much during baking. Most used would be Almond or Coconut Flour. I am doing Keto to loose weight and get back in shape. I have no Gluten allergies. So, for those that do, this isn’t a good choice, but it is for me.

These researchers point out that there are plenty of reasons to suggest that the low-fat-is-good-health hypothesis has now effectively failed the test of time. In particular, that we are in the midst of an obesity epidemic that started around the early 1980’s, and that this was coincident with the rise of the low-fat dogma. (Type 2 diabetes, the most common form of the disease, also rose significantly through this period.)
#1) If you’re not careful, this type of diet can get expensive. But as we know, with a little research, we can make eating healthy incredibly affordable. Admittedly, while I recommend eating organic fruits and veggies, free range chicken, and grass-fed beef whenever possible, these products can be a bit more expensive in conventional stores due to the processes needed to get them there. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E5XTj6D8zfQ
I’m so glad you love it, Tanya! Yes, $17 sounds like a lot for xanthan gum. I use this one here. Swerve is sweeter than erythritol, so you’d need less of it – I have a conversion chart here. You’re absolutely right about the xanthan gum and texture – it will make the bread more chewy. It will still be more of a “light and fluffy” bread, but definitely less muffin-like with the xanthan gum. I haven’t tried add-ins yet – let me know how it goes if you try!

The NY Times had a blog article on Good News on Saturated Fat which is reporting on Gary Taubes's interpretation of the new report in The New England Journal of Medicine on a two-year diet experiment in Israel. A followup is the post The Fat Fight Goes On where Gary rebuts the arguments against the study. And here's a good interview with Taubes (and includes a good summary): Gary Taubes on Cold Fusion, Good Nutrition and What Makes Bad (and Good) Science.
Hi Claudia, unfortunately, more almond butter won’t thicken the bars the way that coconut flour will. You *might* be able to use almond flour, but proceed with caution since almond flour is MUCH less absorbent than coconut flour. Start with 3/4 cup almond flour and experiment until you get the consistency you like (basically, they should be thick and dense enough to cut through.) So sorry to hear about your possible allergy to coconut. 🙁 Big hugs. xo
When you are separating the eggs if you use the method of pouring the egg from one half of the shell to the other you have to be extremely careful because the sharp shell can easily break the yolk. There are tools that you can purchase that will cradle the yolk and let the white run into a separate bowl. Or, you can use your hands. You need to make sure that your hands are extremely clean and fresh from being washed. Break the egg into one hand and let the white slip between your slightly separate fingers. The yolk will settle into your hand and the white will slip off into the bowl.
Catching Fire: How Cooking Made Us Human by Richard Wrangham. This book argues that the ease of digestion and the added nutritional value available in cooked food was the key behind the explosion of human intelligence. (Cooking gelatinizes starch, denatures protein, and softens all foods, permitting more complete digestion and energy extraction. As a result, the food processing apparatus shrinks, freeing energy to support a larger brain.) He then suggests that cooking led to what eventually became marriage and the sexual division of labor. The two most helpful reviews at Amazon get into great detail. The reviews average to 4+ stars.
For example, although white potatoes were recorded as being available during the Paleolithic era, they are usually avoided on the Paleo diet because of their high glycemic index. Processed foods are also technically off limits due to an emphasis on fresh foods, but some Paleo diets allow frozen fruits and vegetables because the freezing process preserves most nutrients. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J0GYdEX6lqQ
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