In light of Paleo's low ranking in US News & World Report, it stands to reason why most RDs don't advocate the diet—and for a variety of reasons. "The Paleo diet has a lot of good things going for it. It recommends excluding processed foods and refined sugars and emphasizes fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, and lean protein," says Heather Mangieri, MS, RDN, CSSD, LDN, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and author of Fueling Young Athletes. However, Mangieri says, "Any diet that suggests eliminating an entire food group can set you up for nutritional deficiencies, boredom, and an overfocus on food." Because the diet eliminates all dairy, meeting calcium and vitamin D requirements can be difficult. Mangieri has experienced this issue firsthand in her private practice. "Even though Paleo proponents claim they can meet their calcium needs from nondairy foods, I have yet to find a client that eats that many greens and is that thought out in their eating. Supplementation becomes a must to meet the needs for these nutrients."
Alyssa, one more thing. Both the bowl and the beaters need to be spotlessly clean. If there is one hint of oil anywhere the whites will not beat properly. Nicole is correct about not using a plastic bowl. Plastic will even absorb oil to say nothing of the microscopic amounts that get into the surface when it’s scratched. When baking it is always best to use a metal or glass bowl for all of your mixing. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EvJ5l-HPIxc
Hi Jodi, I haven’t tried that, but don’t think it would work well for this recipe. First, yeast needs sugar (for it to consume – it’s not typically in the end result), so you’d need to add that. But also, just with how we are making the bread fluffy with beaten egg whites, I don’t think yeast would work. If you want to try adding yeast to a low carb bread, I would do it with this low carb bread recipe instead.

The Paleolithic Prescription: A Program of Diet & Exercise and a Design for Living by S. Boyd Eaton, M.D., Marjorie Shostak and Melvin Konner. This book, published in 1988, was the start of the Paleolithic diet movement. Its recommendations are not in line with what today is considered a paleo diet, as whole grain breads and pastas, legumes and some low fat dairy products are allowed. However, it is still a profoundly important book. Used books are available for a reasonable price.
A number of randomized clinical trials have compared the paleo diet to other eating plans, such as the Mediterranean Diet or the Diabetes Diet. Overall, these trials suggest that a paleo diet may provide some benefits when compared with diets of fruits, vegetables, lean meats, whole grains, legumes and low-fat dairy products. These benefits may include:

#1) If you’re not careful, this type of diet can get expensive. But as we know, with a little research, we can make eating healthy incredibly affordable. Admittedly, while I recommend eating organic fruits and veggies, free range chicken, and grass-fed beef whenever possible, these products can be a bit more expensive in conventional stores due to the processes needed to get them there.
Hi Jodi, I haven’t tried that, but don’t think it would work well for this recipe. First, yeast needs sugar (for it to consume – it’s not typically in the end result), so you’d need to add that. But also, just with how we are making the bread fluffy with beaten egg whites, I don’t think yeast would work. If you want to try adding yeast to a low carb bread, I would do it with this low carb bread recipe instead. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JL-uSe8utFs
Overall, the diet is high in protein, moderate in fat (mainly from unsaturated fats), low-moderate in carbohydrate (specifically restricting high glycemic index carbohydrates), high in fiber, and low in sodium and refined sugars. [2] The monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats (including the omega-3 fats EPA and DHA) come from marine fish, avocado, olive oil, and nuts and seeds.

Hi V. Not all my recipes need nuts or almond flour, but most my baked goods do. This is because almond flour gives the best texture. If your son is allergic to nuts I would suggest substituting the nuts for seeds, and the almond flour for pumpkin or sunflower seed flour. You can also try using a gluten-free oats flours. I haven’t made this substitution in many of my recipes, but it’s worth a try. Please let me know how it goes.
Coconut Flour: As Lexi pointed out Coconut Flour is not a 1:1 ratio. Coconut flour absorbs a LOT of liquid, so you have to either combine it with other flours in light quantaties, or use 6 eggs for every 1/2 cup of flour. Yes, I said 6 eggs with every ONE HALF cup of coconut flour. You can also use various liquids. Either way, it needs to have the same consistency as it would if you used the almond flour, it should be thin like pancake. If not it will out very dense.

I tried this recipe and it is not at all easy to incorporate 1/2 the egg whites in the food processor. When attempting to pulse just 2-3 times, only part of the egg whites incorporated, leaving 1/2 the whipped egg whites still sitting at the top of the mixture. I then had to use a spatula to force it down and pulsed 3 more times and ended up with a heavy batter because the egg whites completely fell. Then trying to fold the mixture into the rest of the egg whites was like trying to fold in cookie dough. The result was a loaf of baked eggs whites that had clumps of batter in the middle.
Hi Nancy, this recipe does not make enough batter to properly fill a full sized loaf pan. So, if you use the recommended size baking pan, the bread will be the proper height. If you use a pan that is bigger than the one I used, your bread will rise, but it won’t fill the pan to the right height. Here’s an example that might help –if you place 1/2 cup of water in a 1/2 measuring cup it will be 100% full to the top of the cup. If you put the same 1/2 cup of water in a 1 cup measuring cup it will only fill it 50% and will only be 1/2 full in height. That’s why a loaf pan that is too large doesn’t work for this recipe when it comes to the height of the loaf :-)
Happy weekend, and round up Sunday! I’m writing you from Colorado where we just had our first-ever, in-person Healthy Glow Co. retreat. I got to spend the weekend with the HGC team and 14 amazing members that make our collective possible. Feeling inspired, refreshed, and SO excited about the community we’ve built. I’ll be sure to share more details of our trip soon, but first let’s talk about these incredible paleo dessert recipes that I rounded up for you guys!

Sometimes you don’t need a loaf of bread, and you just need enough for yourself to make a sandwich or to serve as a side to a hearty Paleo chili. This single serve recipe can easily be multiplied if needed, but it’s best when used as a one-serving bread when you don’t have the time, desire, or need for more than just enough for yourself. The way they’ve figure out how to make this Paleo friendly and ready to go in just a few minutes is impressive. It makes the perfect companion to all sorts of soups and stews, as the bookends to a sandwich, or as an accompaniment to eggs and bacon. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q3ywOo3iNoY
So this is really good. Even my non paleo husband enjoyed it. I have to say I’m very glad it’s a forgiving recipe though. I had some weird internet glitch and I started making this recipe but the ingredients were off so I reloaded my page and then the correct ingredients came up. But by then I had already put 6 eggs and too much salt. Still delicious! I used tapioca because i didn’t have arrowroot. Thank you for sharing!
While going bonkers and eating chocolate creations 3 times per day is unnecessary (and would sorta defeat the point of Whole30, and Paleo in general) I DO think it’s a great time to explore all the Paleo dessert options out there – so we can have our cake (quite literally) – and still feel awesome after eating it.  That’s what Paleo treats and desserts are all about in my opinion – and it’s NO secret that I’m quite the fan of dessert, just check out the “sweet treats” section of the blog!
The digestive abilities of anatomically modern humans, however, are different from those of Paleolithic humans, which undermines the diet's core premise.[4] During the 2.6-million-year-long Paleolithic era, the highly variable climate and worldwide spread of human populations meant that humans were, by necessity, nutritionally adaptable. Supporters of the diet mistakenly presuppose that human digestion has remained essentially unchanged over time.[4][5] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zhL5DCizj5c
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