Hi Elana, first let me say this bread is DELICIOUS! It turned out sweet, very moist, and just wonderful. HOWEVER, I am new to gluten free baking and despite the deliciousness of the bread, I ended up with a very faint ammonia-ish smell/after-taste and for the life of me I cannot figure out why. The only difference in the way I made my bread from your recipe is that I used whole, raw almond meal and whole, raw flaxseed meal, because that is what I had on hand. Oh and i used pure maple syrup instead of honey.
I am currently looking for a recipe to try in my recently acquired, but not-yet-used silicone challah mold (https://www.amazon.com/Amazing-Perfect-Silicone-Bakeware-Braiding/dp/B005NAGY8O). Our family eats gluten-free, with a strong leaning towards a whole foods/Paleo diet. My husband and I are happy to enjoy a Shabbat dinner sans challah, though our 8- and 5-year-old daughters are very disappointed (especially when we are at synagogue and we ask them not to have any of the challah) to be missing out. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NIq35QNJlPs
Get in a serious dose of healthy fats with these peppermint patties. Coconut butter, coconut oil and shredded coconut pack a hefty dose of it, but more importantly, when they’re mixed with cacao nibs powder and peppermint extract, they taste like a better-for-you version of your favorite peppermint treat. Plus, when an ingredients list includes two pinches of love, how can you go wrong?
Worried, before I made this recipe I calculated the calories. Because just because something is healthy doesn’t mean you can eat as much as you want! I have an 8×4 inch loaf pan that it is baking in. 1/2 inch slices for an 8 inch pan are 134 calories per slice. Can’t wait to taste it when it’s done. I hope those slices are filling because I have a feeling they will be small.
Research into the weight loss effects of the paleolithic diet has generally been of poor quality.[10] One trial of obese postmenopausal women found improvements in weight and fat loss after six months, but the benefits had ceased by 24 months; side effects among participants included "weakness, diarrhea, and headaches".[10] In general, any weight loss caused by the diet is merely the result of calorie restriction, rather than a special feature of the diet itself.[10]
The rationale for the Paleolithic diet derives from proponents' claims relating to evolutionary medicine.[22] Advocates of the diet state that humans were genetically adapted to eating specifically those foods that were readily available to them in their local environments. These foods therefore shaped the nutritional needs of Paleolithic humans. They argue that the physiology and metabolism of modern humans have changed little since the Paleolithic era.[23] Natural selection is a long process, and the cultural and lifestyle changes introduced by western culture have occurred quickly. The argument is that modern humans have therefore not been able to adapt to the new circumstances.[24] The agricultural revolution brought the addition of grains and dairy to the diet.[25] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oRafxW1OaUc
Thank you for another amazing recipe, Elana! I am thrilled to find delicious recipes that support a healthy lifestyle, and that I can share with family and friends. Your cookbooks are a staple in our house and your blog is a gift to me. I am looking forward to trying some of your great breakfast ideas to start to school year off right. Thanks for sharing the fruit of your efforts. :)
Paleoista: Gain Energy, Get Lean, and Feel Fabulous With the Diet You Were Born to Eat by Nell Stephenson. Paleoista is not only a how-to book, it is also a glimpse into the life of a woman who gives advice on how to eat this way, and lives the life, day in and day out. The author's websites: NellStephenson.com Nutrition & Fitness and Paleoista.com. To be published May 1, 2012. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9mgiY1oLE-g
Once they’re good to go, the process of making these paleo breads couldn’t be easier. It goes like this. Throw a bunch of ingredients in a food processor, and hit the “on” button to mix up the batter. Then, transfer it to a pan and bake it. The biggest challenge I have making these is to get the oven to heat as quickly as I can get the bread batter ready for it.
As much as I love your recipes, what your calling paleo isn’t really paleo. For examplpe, apple cider vinegar, agave nectar, and salt aren’t paleo foods. There is a lot of hype out there about eating paleo. As a nutritionist, I find some of the claims about what paleo is disconcerting and confusing. I hope people are seeking help when they are following any “diet.”

I would like to try this Paleo recipe as it really does look like a healthy one! We appreciate all your hard work “tweaking” these recipes to get them just right! However, I would like to comment that some of your recipe “supporters” live in Canada and we can’t get some of the brand named items you mention at times. Perhaps for this reason some have asked re substitutions. As an example, I made your Chocolate Prune Bars the other day but wasn’t sure about the NuNaturals Stevia. I didn’t know whether it was a powder or a liquid, and since we don’t have that brand here I took a “leap in the dark” and used SweetLeaf Vanilla Creme since there was vanilla in the recipe anyway. I’m sure yours turned out better than mine but I’m going to try again. Also, wasn’t sure whether the chocolate chips were semi-sweet or unsweetened, but just used what I had, which was bittersweet. I guess that item is pretty well a personal choice. Just thought I would let you know that we do have some different brand names in Canada which can sometimes confuse the issue.

This was awesome. This is my second attempt at a no wheat bread. I did one before with coconut flour and it tasted like a salty cake. This is perfect. And I had to make few substitutions. Can’t wait to try the original recipe as I know it will taste even better. I had to substitute the flax meal and seeds with ground sesame and sesame seeds (no background on this, I made it up because I didn’t have flax seeds) and used olive oil instead of butter because I was too anxious to get it done and didn’t want to wait the melted butter to cool off. Even with this changes it browned perfectly, and it’s so fluffy!!! I’ll try toasting it to get a harder texture to be able to use it with toppings. Thank you very much for this recipe. 5 stars!!! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uHtriY7T7sw

Bill, my regular sized loaf pans are 9X5, and a loaf that size would require 3 cups of flour, 1 cup of water along with a little yeast, oil, salt and sugar. Before baking, the dough would be allowed to rise until doubled in volume, completely filling the pan and rising slightly over the top. This dough won’t even come close to filling that size loaf pan and it isn’t going to rise much. In fact about the best you’re going to get is that it will “puff” up a little from the reaction between the baking soda and vinegar, plus a bit more from the steam released during baking. I would suggest a much smaller loaf pan. Somewhere in the neighborhood of 6 X 3.5. Don’t be a slave to those numbers, find something close. My pans are old and some probably aren’t even being made anymore so just do what you can. Also, this recipe is going to create more of a batter than a dough, don’t leave it sit too long before putting it in the oven or the chemical reaction between the baking soda and vinegar will be all over before it even starts to bake. My suggestion is get it in the oven as soon as you can after mixing the ingredients. That way you’ll get as much rise as possible from the mixture. Good luck!
I added chia seeds to give the bread a bit of a healthy crunch, but also for the many nutritional benefits of these little wonders.  This a great low carb bread full of all my favourite low carb flours and so easy to make too.   You could add other flavours to this with herbs and spices and not be disappointed.  My next plan with this is to probably add some seeds to it.    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6JMPLMKoDMA
We cannot time travel and join our Paleo ancestors by the campfire as they prepare to eat; likewise, shards of ancient pottery and fossilized teeth can tell us only so much. If we compare the diets of so-called modern hunter-gatherers, however, we see just how difficult it is to find meaningful commonalities and extract useful dietary guidelines from their disparate lives (see infographic). Which hunter–gatherer tribe are we supposed to mimic, exactly? How do we reconcile the Inuit diet—mostly the flesh of sea mammals—with the more varied plant and land animal diet of the Hadza or !Kung? Chucking the many different hunter–gather diets into a blender to come up with some kind of quintessential smoothie is a little ridiculous. "Too often modern health problems are portrayed as the result of eating 'bad' foods that are departures from the natural human diet…This is a fundamentally flawed approach to assessing human nutritional needs," Leonard wrote. "Our species was not designed to subsist on a single, optimal diet. What is remarkable about human beings is the extraordinary variety of what we eat. We have been able to thrive in almost every ecosystem on the Earth, consuming diets ranging from almost all animal foods among populations of the Arctic to primarily tubers and cereal grains among populations in the high Andes.”

What is the tunnel effect? A hole or a tunnel of “less-cooked” batter as I am encountering? It’s not raw enough to not eat. Just a tad denser and wetter. But it’s truly delicious. I finish it off under the broiler for 2-3 minutes other wise the too does not brown even after 30-33 minutes. Any suggestions on cooking all the way through? (Oh…I should ad that I’m using a 5×9 Pyrex for baking. That’s prolly part of the problem).


As for the mixing…I mixed the dry ingredients in one bowl, then separated the egg yolks and whites, in bowls. I whipped the whites until they were thick. I added the yolks to the whites, and added the honey and oil. I mixed that up. I added the wet to the dry and mixed. It was really thick. Then I combined the baking soda and vinegar, mixing them. I added them to the whole mix and slightly stirred.

The Stone Age Diet: Based on in-depth studies of human ecology and the diet of man by Walter L. Voegtlin. This was self-published back in 1975. Only a couple hundred copies were printed and distributed to friends and relatives. No one knew the book existed until some years later. In no way is he the father of the paleo diet. It is impossible to purchase. Apparently his descendents are planning a reprint, though the book is poorly written and not based upon factual anthropological information that even was available then. We have put up his Functional and Structural Comparison of Man's Digestive Tract with that of a Dog and Sheep. And a PDF can be found here. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PKF5zGzOkyo
Nutrition & Physical Degeneration by Dr. Weston Price's book puts to rest a lot of myths about diet, dental, physical, and emotional health, and presents the strongest case for a super-nutritious Native (or Paleo) Diet. His book outlines the conditions/causes for exceptional health. A classic that was first published in 1938. The Soil and Health Library has a Book Review by Steve Solomon. If you don't buy the book at least read the review. N.B. If you live in one of the countries where this book is now in the public domain, you can read it online. But not if you live in a country where it is still under copyright protection.

Hi Valerie, so funny, I just got asked this question! 🙂 Here’s what I said, “…almond flour is a lot less absorbent than coconut flour (like A LOT). I know a few people have tried using oat flour with success, but I worry that almond flour would not be sufficient for absorbing the almond butter and creating a nice, firm texture. I’d recommend starting with about 3/4 cup almond flour, and experimenting as needed.” Hope this helps!

There has been so much nutrition and dietary mis-information in the past 100 years, it’s very confusing to sort it all out. I’m thankful I found Paleo! And as paleo shoppers, we know to avoid the center of the market and stick to the outside loop which is where we find the lean proteins, the nuts, seeds, greens, vegetables and fruits. It not only saves us time when we shop, it keeps us healthy.

I just made this today, and my husband, toddler, and I all loved it! We used ours for cheese and tomato sandwiches, and my husband managed to eat about half of the loaf before it even cooled. Like another person mentioned, I had to bake mine longer, but for me it was nearly twice as long (I’m at a relatively high altitude, maybe that’s why?). As yet another person said, it will now be a staple in our home too!
I’ve perused your bread recipe offerings (which I hadn’t really looked at previously since we mostly just opt-out of bread-type products) and am wondering which you would most recommend as a kid-pleaser to try in the challah mold. Additionally, I am wondering if you’ve ever played around with a potato-based bread option? I would prefer something that is not entirely flour based (including nut flours), if it is possible . . .
According to the CDC, cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death in the United States. Interestingly however, our Paleolithic ancestors and contemporarily studied hunter-gatherers showed virtually no heart attack or stroke while eating ancestral diets. The references below will explore these facts to better help you understand the heart-healthy benefits of a Paleo diet. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XyiCfNSG1_A
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