Help! I followed the recipe to the letter. I used butter and greek yogurt. Something went horribly wrong. I used 88grams of butter as i don’t have tablespoons (converted on the internet) and organic micro fine almond flour. My mixture was not a batter it resembled a pastry mix. What am I doing wrong. I think its the flour? I live in England so have to find where I can purchase the product over here.
I had no idea what had happened, but knew I would probably not be taking photos of that particular loaf to share with you all. I didn’t even know if I could eat it. Luckily after a bit of research I found out the true cause. It turns out, when sunflower seeds are cooked together with baking soda, they react by turning bright green. It’s also completely safe to eat, though it looks quite strange. The entire baking incident turned out to be a happy accident because I made it the weekend before St. Patrick’s Day. So I found myself with a loaf of green bread in spirit of the holiday. I had stumbled upon a natural form of food coloring, completely by accident.
The final benefit we’ll discuss is a balanced dietary alkaline load. While this concept sounds complex, it’s actually quite simple: after digestion, all foods present either a net acid or alkaline load to the kidneys. Meats, fish, grains, legumes, cheese, and salt all produce acids, while Paleo-approved fruits and vegetables yield alkalines. A lifetime of excessive dietary acid may promote bone and muscle loss, high blood pressure, an increased risk for kidney stones, and may aggravate asthma and exercise-induced asthma. The Paleo diet seeks to reduce the risk of chronic disease by emphasising a balanced alkaline load.
Closely examining one group of modern hunter–gatherers—the Hiwi—reveals how much variation exists within the diet of a single small foraging society and deflates the notion that hunter–gatherers have impeccable health. Such examination also makes obvious the immense gap between a genuine community of foragers and Paleo dieters living in modern cities, selectively shopping at farmers' markets and making sure the dressing on their house salad is gluten, sugar and dairy free. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mJK74-LC4hE
I really do hope you read this. It may make a difference to some people. I know it makes a huge difference to me. I tried your paleo bread recipe and several other bread recipes on other websites. I kept tasting a bitter undertone in the bread. Every time it would just make me gag. I finally figured it out that it’s the almond flour. It makes sense now, since almonds DO have a bitter aftertaste. But it usually doesn’t matter when using whole or chopped almonds. So I tried your paleo bread recipe by replacing it with cashew flour. I had to make the flour myself in the vitamix blender, but it worked real well. AT LAST, NO BITTER UNDERTONE! I recommend informing people that cashew flour is an alternative. The only problem I have now is that it still doesn’t have that wheat bread taste. I tried increasing the flax seed meal to 1/2 cup and reducing the cashew flour to 1 3/4 cups but the flax seed meal still didn’t shine through. I know flax seed meal has the potential to create the taste. I intend to increase it further in my next attempt. BTW, I’m not worried about the phytoestrogens in flax seed because my naturopathic doctor says it doesn’t act like real estrogen.

Our ancestors didn't chase cows and chickens around in the wild. They hunted game, antelopes, buffalo, and probably some animals we've never heard of that are long extinct. Their meat was generally quite lean, and provided more healthy omega 3s than meats from modern day animals, even the grass-fed ones, according to Dr. Katz. Many of the plants that thrived back then are also extinct today, making it impossible to truly follow their meal plan, he says.
Evolution of the Human Diet: The Known, the Unknown, and the Unknowable by Peter S. Ungar. Diet is key to understanding the ecology and evolution of our distant ancestors and their kin, the early hominins. A study of the range of foods eaten by our progenitors underscores just how unhealthy many of our diets are today. This volume brings together authorities from disparate fields to offer new insights into the diets of our ancestors. Paleontologists, archaeologists, primatologists, nutritionists and other researchers all contribute pieces to the puzzle. The book has four sections: Reconstructed diets based on hominin fossils--tooth size, shape, structure, wear, and chemistry, mandibular biomechanics. Archaeological evidence of subsistence--stone tools and modified bones. Models of early hominin diets based on the diets of living primates--both human and non-human, paleoecology, and energetics. Nutritional analyses and their implications for evolutionary medicine. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LssXGFdueFM
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