Hi Slee, there are many variations of the Paleo diet and many people do eat dairy for it’s health benefits. This isn’t a diet, but more of a guide to help people with different goals and health problems. We focus on eliminating processed foods and those that cause inflammation, and we focus on eating nutrient-dense foods. So although it’s true that some of the enzymes in the yogurt die during baking at certain temperatures, we are still training our minds to look for nutritions foods. This is especially important for people starting out with this way of eating and living.
Thanks for asking (kinda). Back in the day, about two years ago, I baked nonstop. I baked even more than I do now that I have a food blog (which is A LOT). Every day, I would make 4-6 batches of cookies. Then, I’d make nice cream (which was called banana soft serve back then), meal prep for the next two weeks, then spend the night putting together packages for my sisters.
[…] I don't like the word "diet", so I'll say that this is more a way of changing what you eat long-term. It's all based around what our ancestor hunter-gatherers would have eaten, and what we've evolved to be able to process and absorb. The very basic level of it, is that you don't eat carbohydrates, processed meats or sugars, and cut out dairy products. You instead eat plenty of fresh meat, fish, vegetables, fruits and nuts. You can still have oil, provided it's natural – so coconut, peanut & olive oil are all good. The good thing is that you're also allowed to take this to your own level – so if you want a couple of days off a week – say, weekends, you can do it & it will still be a lot healthier for you. This is a really helpful site I've used to make a note on my shopping list of what's allowed: The Ultimate Paleo Diet Food List | Ultimate Paleo Guide […] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XfDrmTzbLSM
I made this bread today using the same exact ingredients and baked it for 25 minutes, edges were brown, toothpick inserted in the center came out clean. It looked great and smelled wonderful. Unfortunately when I tried removing from pan after it cooled, it fell apart. It was not cooked at all in the center. 🙁 I thought I finally found a good bread recipe that came out perfect the first time! Not sure what I did wrong.
Elizabeth, This recipe is a bit heavy on the eggs because they add structure here; without them, it would be difficult to get the same height without doing quite a bit of experimentation to find a suitable substitute. If you’re looking for a paleo-friendly bread-type of recipe, my Paleo Flatbread may be more useful. It’s more of a wrap or can be made thinner into a crepe, rather than a loaf of bread, but it is delicious. That recipe uses one egg, but I’ve successfully made it using a flax “egg” instead of a regular egg. Sorry I’m not able to be more help, but I hope you like the flatbread if you give it a try! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aDs5M-i4GOA
Once your yeast is proofed, add in the egg, egg whites, lightly cooled melted butter (you don't want to scramble the eggs or kill the yeast!) and vinegar. Mix with an electric mixer for a couple minutes until light and frothy. Add the flour mixture in two batches, alternating with the sour cream, and mixing until thoroughly incorporated. You want to mix thoroughly and quickly to activate the xanthan gum, though the dough will become thick as the flours absorb the moisture. 

I didn’t have almond flour so substituted 1 cup millet flour and 1 cup sorghum flour for the almond flour, and baked in an 7.5″ x 4.5″ x 2.5″ loaf pan. The loaf was short, about 1.5″ tall, the texture was pleasantly dense and held together well. The taste, however, was pasty (like flour) and the bread was dry. (I noticed afterwards that the sorghum flour package said to substitute 15-20% sorghum flour in your recipe, so that may have affected the taste and dryness.) I tried a slice with a topping of honey, and that was pretty good, but not good enough. So I made croutons, which were delicious. I cut the bread into small cubes and spread them on a cookie sheet, sprayed them with olive oil spray and drizzled 1/2 stick of butter over them, then seasoned generously with Nature’s Seasonings and garlic powder (for a richer crouton, could also sprinkle with parmesan cheese). I tossed them to distribute the seasonings and baked them at 350 degrees about 20 minutes until crunchy. I’ll try the recipe again when I have almond flour. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jQDpobq7jYY&t=91s
The Paleo diet, also referred to as the "caveman" or "Stone Age" diet, stems from the eating patterns of our ancestors who lived during the Paleolithic era, a time period associated with the development of mankind's tool-making skills, ending around 12,000 years ago. During that time, the women gathered fruit, berries, and vegetables, while the men hunted for meat. In today's modern era, the diet involves mimicking the same eating habits and consuming fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, healthful oils (eg, walnut, olive, coconut, and avocado), meat, fish, shellfish, poultry, and eggs in hopes of leading to a more healthful and disease-free life. The diet also encourages consumption of cage-free eggs and grass-fed meats (lean meat is recommended). It prohibits eating grains, dairy, legumes, potatoes, refined sugar, and refined vegetable oils, because proponents claim these foods appeared only after the agricultural revolution and are associated with inflammation and therefore many chronic conditions including heart disease, cancer, and diabetes. Not only is the diet touted as a more healthful eating pattern but it's also promoted as beneficial for weight loss.
The Hiwi gather and hunt a diverse group of plants and animals from the savannas, forests, rivers and swamps. Their main sources of meat are capybara, collared peccary, deer, anteater, armadillo, and feral cattle, numerous species of fish, and at least some turtle species. Less commonly consumed animals include iguanas and savanna lizards, wild rabbits, and many birds. Not exactly the kind of meat Paleo dieters and others in urban areas can easily obtain.
I have successfully made the Paleo bread twice & it worked out perfectly! However, when I made it recently, the edges of the bread were a gray color upon taking it out of the pan. When I sliced the bread & spread with raspberry jam (to resemble a tea cake), the jam turned blue-gray. I think it was some sort of acidic reaction. I did leave the bread in the pan for about 40 minutes after baking before releasing. Now I just remembered that I used rice vinegar (because I was out of cider). Maybe that caused the reaction? I used anodized aluminum pan by the brand “Fat Daddy.”

No background science here or lengthy explanations, only 15 easy guidelines to follow to kick-start your Paleo journey. It’s up to you to decide to what extent you want to follow those guidelines, but if you follow them 100% you can be assured that you are eating the best food for your body and greatly investing in your long term health and well-being.
Hi there, it’s Lacey! I’m the editor and main writer for A Sweet Pea Chef. I'm a food blogger, health and food coach, professional photographer, and mommy of three. I also run the awesome free Take Back Your Health Community, am the healthy and clean weekly meal planner behind No-Fail Meals, and a little bit in love with Clean Eating. Be sure to check out my free beginner’s guide to eating clean and follow me on YouTube and Instagram to get my latest recipes and healthy eating inspiration. Read More…
I just found this recipe and I notice that the recipes are very similar: this one has the addition of a little coconut flour, half the salt and half the vinegar, but maintains the baking soda quantity. How does the the texture of this bread compare to your low carb corn bread? I’m very curious about what went into the decisions that differentiate the two breads.
I forgot to say I used half al one flour and half sunflower seed flour.. I double the batch and I found if I let it sit for about 25 min, then put it in the oven it gets thicker as it sits and I still have to bake it for an hour. The tast is great. The next time I’m buying Honeyville flour and making it exactly like your recipe says. I’m just worried about mixing it to much. Mine is very dense and heavy. But yummy.
I just stumbled upon your website today..perfect timing! I have been struggling with my first month of switching to the Paleo lifestyle. I love to cook, love to eat, and hate being restricted. Even though I very rarely crave pasta, grains, or dairy I was going a bit nutty because I’m now “not allowed” to have them. Your website has been a blessing. Already today I have made the silver dollar pancakes for breakfast, the Paleo bread for the rest of the week and have so many other recipes I can’t wait to try!

Just made this, thank you for the recipe! My loaf pans were too wide so I used 6 Texas size muffin tins and they came out great. I used maple syrup instead of honey because, well, I live in Vermont and my husband sugars. I am fairly new to Paleo and I’ve been an avid baker for decades-I miss baking! I will experiment with this recipe for sure, using it as a base. The first thing I am imagining is lemon poppy seed and baking them in mini muffin tins. Or baking in a cast iron skillet in the oven like corn bread. And maybe a morning glory version. Oooh my world just opened up. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kd4dlNxaPwk


This bread is amazing! My family is new to paleo and my husband said he would like to have a bread substitute that would go with eggs. I baked my first loaf this morning and it came out perfect. Do need to use a smaller pan as it didn’t rise as high as a regular loaf of bread; however, that’s ok because it’s automatic portion control. The bread is delicious and was a hit with my husband. A definite keeper for the recipe file.
It took me a few days to finally getting around to making these but I did because of your sloppy joe recipe you just posted. They are awesome!!! Next time I will make a double batch of buns! I used a muffin top pan for the buns and they came out perfect for tops and bottoms so I didn’t even have to split them. They bakes up really smooth and held together perfectly for wet sloppy joes! Thanks so much for developing and sharing your recipes. I am definitely becoming one of your biggest followers! Everything you make “works”!

4. Raw food is for the birds (too much of it, anyway). There’s paleo, and then there’s the raw diet. Folks who eat raw tout the health benefits of the approach, saying that they’re accessing the full, complete nutrients available because they’re not heating, and thus destroying, their dinner. But that’s simply wrong. We cook to get our hands on more nutrients, not fewer. According to Wrangham, the one thing absolutely all cultures have in common is that they cook their food. He points out that women who move towards 100 percent raw diets often stop ovulating, because even if in theory they’re tossing sufficient food into the blender to fulfill their caloric needs, they simply can’t absorb enough from the uncooked food.

The data for Cordain's book only came from six contemporary hunter-gatherer groups, mainly living in marginal habitats.[37] One of the studies was on the !Kung, whose diet was recorded for a single month, and one was on the Inuit.[37][38][39] Due to these limitations, the book has been criticized as painting an incomplete picture of the diets of Paleolithic humans.[37] It has been noted that the rationale for the diet does not adequately account for the fact that, due to the pressures of artificial selection, most modern domesticated plants and animals differ drastically from their Paleolithic ancestors; likewise, their nutritional profiles are very different from their ancient counterparts. For example, wild almonds produce potentially fatal levels of cyanide, but this trait has been bred out of domesticated varieties using artificial selection. Many vegetables, such as broccoli, did not exist in the Paleolithic period; broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, and kale are modern cultivars of the ancient species Brassica oleracea.[29]


Origins and Evolution of Human Diet was an academic web site at the University of Arkansas devoted to discussion of evolution and the human diet. They had good articles on the conferences link. Here is one from the archives: Boyd Eaton's Evolution, Diet and Health which argues that current w-6 : w-3 imbalance together with absolute dietary DHA intake quite low in human evolutionary perspective may be relevant to the frequency of unipolar depression.
Getting the grains out is pretty much the top priority when you make a bread that is Paleo approved. That’s what we’re seeing here is the use of coconut flour instead of wheat-based flour. You’re going to get a milky taste from this because they’ve used almond milk, and a creamy taste because there’s cashew butter. This should give the bread a smoothness that you won’t find with other breads on the list, which might make it preferable to some, and others may prefer the other types made out of almond flour or that contain flax meal.
Wonderful recipe; made it today and will make it again. Two changes I had to make: having no golden milled flax, I had brown flax seeds which I ground in my food processor, (didn’t get as fine as milled). Also had no arrowroot, so used tapioca flour. Delighted with the results. It rose beautifully, had to bake it a few more minutes; the top was a bit less smooth than yours, and the texture is probably a bit different due to fax seed not being as fine as milled. It is still a keeper as it holds together well after slicing. My husband (not paleo) made disparaging remarks when I told him I was making paleo bread, but he ate two thick slices with butter before I snatched it away. He says it won’t hold together for sandwich, but I will make him eat his words tomorrow. Thanks for the wonderful recipe! When this is gone, I am going to make the multi-seed and nut bread.

this looks amazing! i am low carb, so this will work for me as opposed to some of your other gluten free breads! i cant have arrowroot powder and other similar ingredients. that being said, i love ALL your recipes and even if they contain ingredients i cant have, they are usually easy to substitute or ‘play’ around with until i get it low carb friendly;) thankfully, you have done the work for me here;)thanks!!!!!
When I make this easy bread recipe, I weigh the zucchini and then use the food processor’s grater attachment to grate the zucchini right onto the batter, which is another time saving step! While this recipe is perfect for the end of summer when your garden is overflowing with zucchini, we also love to make this over the holidays to give to friends.
By latest count, about 800 Hiwi live in palm thatched huts in Colombia and Venezuela. In 1990 Ana Magdalena Hurtado and Kim Hill—now both at Arizona State University in Tempe—published a thorough study (pdf) of the Hiwi diet in the neotropical savannas of the Orinoco River basin in Southwestern Venezuela. Vast grasslands with belts of forest, these savannas receive plenty of rain between May and November. From January through March, however, precipitation is rare: the grasses shrivel, while lakes and lagoons evaporate. Fish trapped in shrinking pools of water are easy targets for caiman, capybaras and turtles. In turn, the desiccating lakes become prime hunting territory for the Hiwi. During the wet season, however, the Hiwi mainly hunt for animals in the forest, using bows and arrows. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gEOLZpj1G8g
In making the case for meat, Cordain presents anecdotal evidence of Eskimos who lived their full life without a heart attack. The Eskimo diet consists of 97% meat, which he concedes causes all Eskimos to develop atherosclerosis—a common precursor to heart disease. But Cordain says Eskimos never die of heart disease. He discusses one Eskimo who lived 45 years and another who lived 53 years, both without heart disease! He then jumps to the conclusion that because these Eskimos didn’t get heart attacks, even with severe atherosclerosis, meat must have protected them from heart disease. So Cordain’s best case for lots of meat is that you can live to the ripe age of 45 or even 53 without a heart attack. But do people—even unhealthy smokers or the obese—generally get heart attacks before age 53?
Pros – I basically threw this together while two toddlers screamed for my attention (I have no idea what got into them today). My almond flour was clumpy and I didn’t know how to fix it (first time baking with it), I don’t have a mixer so I used a whisk, and I forgot the ground flax until after it was in the pan and had to take the batter out and add it. Yet it turned out. And it tastes great, and it slices! I used the 4 eggs, 1 tsp baking soda and 35 min comment as a guide. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GwrHWuqiL1g
Early man didn’t have microwaves, but if they did they surely could have whipped up some of this Paleo bread. Sometimes you need or want bread in a hurry, like if you forgot to make it, or if you realize that a meal would be perfectly complete if it just had some bread to go with it. While there may not be any ancestral connection to our love of bread, it’s hard to argue that it’s become a staple of many diets, and really helps to satiate an appetite. But since it represents a part of the Neolithic time, bread isn’t truly Paleo even if it’s made with Paleo friendly ingredients.
One question, when I released this bread out of the pan there was a very strong ammonia smell coming from the bread. After it cooled this ammonia smell was gone. I’m just curious what could cause that odor? Is it a reaction from the almond flour? I was just caught off guard when I bent over to get a whiff of the freshly baked loaf and it smelled of ammonia! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OxF2u_3URxs
We have four of these separated, but I don’t know if they are oven safe. They have a little rubber, maybe silicone nobs on the end of the handles, but I’ve no idea if they can be used in the oven as they didn’t come in a package, they were bought separately and I am trying to find recipes for bread/buns that I can do that are quite easy and don’t require anything more than what I’ve already got.
I made dressing/stuffing out of this bread! I cut the bread into slices, then cut the slices into cubes. I put them on a metal pan and into my toaster oven on low temperature and let them crisp up. It takes a good while, but they DO get crisp! Then I have my croutons for the dressing. The dressing I made was delicious. I think the next time I make the bread to use for croutons I’m going to add onion powder and sage to the mixture before baking so the croutons will be seasoned some before I begin making the dressing! Love this bread! It is the most like wheat flour bread that I have tried! Thanks Maya!
Hello!! Went grain free about two months ago to reverse a chronic illness. Am feeling great but was jonesing for a piece of bread!! Big time!! And that’s what you gave me! I wish I could share the photos I have of this loaf which baked up beautifully!! It is light and airy and tastes mild and yummy. Interestingly, when I toasted it up, a hint of coconut came out (obviously from the coconut flour). Thank you so much for sharing this… sandwich here I come!!
Hi Howard, You’re right that this bread doesn’t rise much – the volume comes mostly from whipping the egg whites. If the whites fell too much, the bread might not be tall enough. But even if they didn’t, it might still be shorter than some other tall bread loaves. Feel free to multiply the recipe by 1.5 if you prefer a taller loaf. I’m glad you liked the flavor and texture!
These looked amazing, so I made them. We are GF in this house and these are perfect for us. My 11 & 7 yo boys asked for more. That never happens with GF products. This is the first recipe that I have made at home that is easy and taste great. Thank you so much for posting! Just an FYI – Nutiva makes a organic, non gmo blend of red palm and coconut oils shortening. That is what I used and they came out awesome.

I am allergic to chicken eggs so I have to use duck or no eggs. I will look for lighter flax though. I just thought there was no difference but colour. I did try it with two of the duck eggs only using the whites. It came out a bit lighter but still dense. My 4 year old even loved it and that is a hard thing to do lol! I toasted in a pan with grass fed butter and put maple syrup on, he asked for it the next day (this is a child that hates breakfast food)! So good! Thank you!
Just made this bread this morning and it was wonderful! It will be a life saver since my 2 year old and husband are obsessed with bread. My only problem was that it came out very flat (only about an 1.5-2 inches thick). The only difference I could think of was that the only yogurt I had was plain whole milk, not greek. I was thinking about doubling the batch and cooking time to see if I get a thicker loaf. Any thoughts? It makes a good snack bread, but not sandwich bread since the slices are so small (they’d be finger sandwiches). Thanks again!!
Thank you Elana for posting such a delishious bread recipe. I followed the recipe as originally posted, but I didn’t feel there was enough batter, so I made another batch and added it to the first. The only change was I added aprox. 1 tsp. of cream of tartar. I used unpasturized dark honey, but next time I will only use 1 TBS. instead of the 2 for when I double the recipe. I think 1 TBS. will be plenty enough. I also baked the loaf a little longer until it was browned because of it’s thickness. Out of the grain free breads I have experimented with in baking, this one is definately the best. The taste and texture completed my ham and cucumber sandwich. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EBuZM_RNfSA
these were amazing. I was skeptical at first because of other failed experiments. I decided to try these one more time and it worked. High in ww points at 6 but worth it. I didn’t have a mould but use 1/2 cup measure and made 4 “pancakes” each about 5 ” round and baked for 10 minutes. Used coconut oil instead of palm oil, the only change I made. Worth the effort and will make this routine. Thanks
I have a processor but I use my big girl lifting weights mixer. I use the whip not the paddle to mix first the eggs getting in lots of air and and fold in 2 cups of thick yogurt cheese.(Regular non fat plain yogurt filtered though a coffee filter in the refrig.) I use the paddle and add the dry ingredients. I mix them on slow and just for a brief make sure that the dough it is all the same all the way through. I am seeing now whether I can replace the coconut oil with extra virgin elixir of the olives as sweet is not great with horseradish on roast beef. I’m also thinking that although it doesn’t rise much if at all that if I patted it into a loaf shape in some way and oiled the crust heavily it might have a smooth crust. and then plop it in the pan. I toast it like for egg in the hole by browning it in a heavy frying pan. Okay it is not bread bread but it better than no b read at all. And best of all I like it just fine and that’s what counts in the long run. Food should not be such a big deal. It should get your from point A to Point B with style and class not slathering butter on just cooked doughy yeasty hard on the digestion bread for me any more. I’m going to try going all almond flour as the coconut flour has so moisture and sweet ness that contributes to the heavy texture I think Of course the moisture is what makes it stick together too, Everything is a work in progress remember to use your processor to make crumbs out of the not so hot loaves. Breaded lemon dill tilapia anyone? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D85tDRhO1Ow
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