For most people the fact the Paleo diet delivers the best results is all they need. Improved blood lipids, weight loss, and reduced pain from autoimmunity is proof enough.  Many people however are not satisfied with blindly following any recommendations, be they nutrition or exercise related. Some folks like to know WHY they are doing something. Fortunately, the Paleo diet has stood not only the test of time, but also the rigors of scientific scrutiny.
A 2015 study in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology found that 76 people who followed the Paleo diet for 60 days (as well as those who followed vegan, Mediterranean and DASH plans for the same length of time) lost an average of 9 pounds and showed improvement in their blood pressure levels. The effects were greatest and most sustained among people who also attended regular diet support group meetings.
No background science here or lengthy explanations, only 15 easy guidelines to follow to kick-start your Paleo journey. It’s up to you to decide to what extent you want to follow those guidelines, but if you follow them 100% you can be assured that you are eating the best food for your body and greatly investing in your long term health and well-being.
Hi Becky! If you use the recommended size baking pan, the bread will be the proper height and you will be able to use it for sandwiches. If you use a pan that is bigger than the one I used, your bread won’t fill the pan up. Here’s an example –if you place 1/2 cup of water in a 1/2 measuring cup it will be 100% full to the top of the cup. If you put the same 1/2 cup of water in a 1 cup measuring cup it will only fill it 50% and will only be 1/2 full in height. That’s why a loaf pan that is too large doesn’t work for this recipe when it comes to the height of the loaf :-)
Thank you for taking care of us who need your recipes! I recently found out that tapioca comes from the cassava plant and that is where they get cyanide from, so I know longer eat it and found out that I was allergic to it. If its not refined enough, it is a problem for many people who eat it and don’t know why they don’t feel good. You might want to consider not using it or xanthan gum or guar gum in any of your recipes either. They come from Pakistan and India and cause stomach distress in many people as they are a bean. Guar gum is used in oil fracking so it’s really not a great ingredient to be putting into food either!
Cordain argues that chimpanzees and horses avoid meat, and they have big bellies that we would have if we didn’t ditch plants for meat. He also says meat increased human brain size, and decreased stomach size so we can have the six-pack abs that chimps can’t. But I looked at his endnotes with citations to research and couldn’t find the source for these theories. I also couldn’t find research showing that legumes and grains were invented by humans.
Success! My very first attempt at baking “paleo”. This is very tasty and so very easy. I used the recipe with honey and coconut oil. I recently shifted my diet to low carb and no sugar, and really needed a bread that fit the new diet. This is perfect. THANK YOU for sharing the years of experience and knowledge you have with cooking Paleo. I think the size of the pan is very important to get a rise out of the mixture, so folks just follow this fool proof recipe and enjoy. I bought your recent book, Paleo Cooking, on iTunes so it is easy to have the recipe at my fingertip on my phone right there in the kitchen.
I’ve lived with food intolerances for about 30 years so I’m happy experimenting with all sorts of different ingredients. However, I’ve recently realised I have a problem with gluten and whilst I can make breads such as this one successfully I’ve never found a substitute that gives me the elasticity of gluten (I am unable to eat gluten free flour and having found out the ingredient that gives it the elasticity I no longer want to eat it). Have you ever found a flour or a combination of ingredients that gives the elasticity to make something like pitta bread? May I say that I wish I’d had access to your blog, ideas and cook books 30 years ago, they’re fantastic and my life would have been so much easier. Thank you for making the time to both experiment and share your ideas with others.
Speaking from experience, you won’t be able to taste even the slightest coconut flavor in the bread, especially with just a small amount! Coconut flour has very unique properties compared to other flours (much more absorbent) and can’t be easily substituted. With how many tries it can take to get paleo baked goods to to have the right taste/texture, I recommend following Michelle’s recipe as written! 🙂
I have admired your blog and recipes for a while now. But as a “Paleo” devotee and blogger I am motivated to compliment you on this particular post. The first sentence about gluten free not necessarily meaning healthy is so true and has kept me from trying a lot of gluten free products and recipes. But my kids often request some sort of gluten free bread (kinda funny that kids would consider getting bread a treat!) I can’t wait to try this recipe because the ingredients are really wholesome -truly “Paleo”.
Thank you for so much for experimenting until you developed this delicious recipe! We (me, husband, 12yo daughter, 10yo son) just finished Paleo restart, 30 days. My son has been so desperate to have bread, now he can have nut butter & homemade jelly sandwiches! He’s ecstatic…me too! ???? ???? ???? Thanks for sharing…it’s because of people like you that are making this journey not so overwhelming!

Following the paleo diet can be pricey. Inexpensive and healthy non-meat protein sources like soy and beans are off-limits, and a recent BMJ Open study shows that healthy meats like lean ground beef and boneless, skinless chicken breasts cost an average of 29 cents more per serving compared to less-healthy ones, such as high-fat ground beef and chicken drumsticks. Even switching from peanut butter to paleo-approved almond butter will cost you—it goes for up to $13 a jar.
How quickly I have gone back on my promise to stop talking about the weather, but seriously, with a heatwave like we’re having right now, how can anyone be expected to focus on anything else? And I don’t know about you, but these days turning on the oven feels like a mortal sin. If you live in a place where you can even consider turning on your oven right now, I envy you. But for the rest of us, short of starvation (or, at the very least, dessert withdrawal), the only solution is a no-bake treat. All of these paleo desserts fit the bill. 

Hi there, it’s Lacey! I’m the editor and main writer for A Sweet Pea Chef. I'm a food blogger, health and food coach, professional photographer, and mommy of three. I also run the awesome free Take Back Your Health Community, am the healthy and clean weekly meal planner behind No-Fail Meals, and a little bit in love with Clean Eating. Be sure to check out my free beginner’s guide to eating clean and follow me on YouTube and Instagram to get my latest recipes and healthy eating inspiration. Read More… https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0KQgyfPixmw
Autoimmunity is a process in which our bodies own immune system attacks “us.” Normally the immune system protects us from bacterial, viral, and parasitic infections. The immune system identifies a foreign invader, attacks it, and ideally clears the infection. A good analogy for autoimmunity is the case of tissue rejection after organ donation. If someone requires a new heart, lung kidney or liver due to disease or injury, a donor organ may be an option. The first step in this process is trying to find a tissue “match”. All of us have molecules in our tissues that our immune system uses to recognize self from non-self. If a donated organ is not close enough to the recipient in tissue type the immune system will attack and destroy the organ. In autoimmunity, a similar process occurs in that an individuals own tissue is confused as something foreign and the immune system attacks this “mislabeled” tissue. Common forms of autoimmunity include Multiple Sclerosis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Lupus, and Vitiligo to name only a tiny fraction of autoimmune diseases. Elements of autoimmunity are likely at play in conditions as seemingly unrelated as Schizophrenia, infertility, and various forms of cancer.
The Carnitine Miracle by Robert Crayhon, M.S. The nutrient carnitine is abundant in red meat. According to Crayhon carnitine helps balance blood lipids and blood sugar levels, maximizes energy levels, increases endurance, eliminates discomfort in ketosis, promotes burning of fat and building of muscle and increases overall well-being. See reviews at Amazon.
Elizabeth, This recipe is a bit heavy on the eggs because they add structure here; without them, it would be difficult to get the same height without doing quite a bit of experimentation to find a suitable substitute. If you’re looking for a paleo-friendly bread-type of recipe, my Paleo Flatbread may be more useful. It’s more of a wrap or can be made thinner into a crepe, rather than a loaf of bread, but it is delicious. That recipe uses one egg, but I’ve successfully made it using a flax “egg” instead of a regular egg. Sorry I’m not able to be more help, but I hope you like the flatbread if you give it a try!
Paleonutrition by Mark Q. Sutton, Kristin D. Sobolik, and Jill K. Gardner is the analysis of prehistoric human diets and the interpretation of dietary intake in relation to health and nutrition. This is a substantial text that combines background to paleonutrition, an extensive bibliography, a discussion on methods, and case studies. Published February 23, 2010.
The Paleo diet, also referred to as the caveman or Stone-Age diet, includes lean meats, fish, fruits, vegetables, nuts, and seeds. Proponents of the diet emphasize choosing low-glycemic fruits and vegetables. There is debate about several aspects of the Paleo diet: what foods actually existed at the time, the variation in diets depending on region (e.g., tropical vs. Arctic), how modern-day fruits and vegetables bear little resemblance to prehistoric wild versions, and disagreement among Paleo diet enthusiasts on what is included/excluded from the diet. Because of these differences, there is not one “true” Paleo diet.
This recipe looks wonderful, Elana! Till now, I made an all-almond flour bread and even though it was semi-sweet and delicious, it was also dense and chunky. Just last weekend, I caught myself wondering – what if I were to add just a bit of coconut flour to create some fluffiness? And then I started fretting about the proportions and decided to sleep on it for a few nights and postpone my kitchen adventures till next weekend.
Diet has been an important part of our evolution—as it is for every species—and we have inherited many adaptations from our Paleo predecessors. Understanding how we evolved could, in principle, help us make smarter dietary choices today. But the logic behind the Paleo diet fails in several ways: by making apotheosis of one particular slice of our evolutionary history; by insisting that we are biologically identical to stone age humans; and by denying the benefits of some of our more modern methods of eating.
After making this wonderful bread half a dozen times (that’s in 10 days!) I decided to experiment. To this recipe I added a handful of each: drained and dried Calamata olives, fresh rosemary, raw pecans. I doubled the salt, at least, and sprinkled a few shakes of garlic powder into the batter. The new bread is just delicious. I just finished a piece with a smear of chèvre on it whine still warm.
Cordain admits that meat leads to plaque and increases cholesterol where plants wouldn’t. And science establishes that plaque and cholesterol lead to heart attacks and strokes. But Cordain argues that plaque alone is insufficient to cause harm. Rather, it is plaque combined with inflammation that causes heart attacks and strokes. So avoid acid, salt, legumes, wheat, starchy vegetables, dairy, oil, fatty meats, and grains because they cause inflammation. But if both science and Cordain agree that plaque is a necessary part of the heart-disease equation—and that meat causes plaque—why should we follow Paleo rather than just forgo meat?

I went to buy Xanthan gum at a store in my little town and it was like $17! I wasn’t paying that much, so I made it without but I will be ordering some online. I followed your directions exactly (minus Xanthan) and used Swerve for the sweetener. I couldn’t wait for it to cool so I had a piece right after it came out of the oven, it was delicious! I find it a tad sweet for bread, but that’s ok I’ll just cut back on the sweetener if I want to eat it for a sandwich..all sweeteners are a little different. It had a beautiful crust on it and was a tiny bit crumbly, almost reminds me more of muffin texture, I’m thinking maybe the Xanthan will give it more of a chewy bread texture?
I made the dinner rolls today and the recipe worked great. I lightly greased a muffin pan, used a scant half cup of batter for each roll, baked for 15-18 minutes and they are perfect for holiday dinners. My yeild was 13 rolls. Good thing there was extra, because I ate one hot from the oven. I also used coconut vinegar and coconut nectar instead of apple cider vinegar and honey. Yum, Yum, Yum
hi – thanks for the recipe…we LOVE all your recipes in your books and blogs..and we are a Paleo and dairy free..Paleo my husband and son HAS to because of dairy intolerance. I would like to mention that those following a strict Paleo diet need to omit the Flax. Flax is not a paleo ingredient as it is a cultivated grain. I have omitted the flax in your recipes when called for and you never miss it. Thanks again for all of your hardwork and recipes!!!
The following links tend towards news reports of scientific studies that point out some positive aspect of the paleo diet. If you are looking for current news reports, I suggest signing up for Google Alerts for the Type: News. I have three set up, for: "caveman diet," "paleo diet," and "paleolithic diet." You can also set them up for blogs and/or websites. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R_CKXnn6dzI
Hi, Kaylie. It’s yummy! I just made the bread and ate 4(!) slices before slicing and freezing the rest. I followed the recipe exactly, using the same ingredients, measurements, temp. and baking time. I was surprised by the size of the finished loaf. It measured 3 7/8″ wide by 2″ high. I can’t imagine making a sandwich with slices that size! That said, it tastes great, and has a very good texture. At 35 minutes, I used a toothpick to see if it was baked through. The toothpick came out clean, but on slicing it, I think I’ll give it a few more minutes when I make it again. Thanks for the recipe.
Made this today. Came out perfectly! Hubby and son are grain free, and son has Autism which comes with food sensory issues and limited palate! My son liked this bread. It’s true that it’s not a standard slice like with traditional loaves made with wheat flour, but it’s big enough to make a sandwich still. Thanks for the great recipe! Tried to rate it but it won’t let me go up to 5 stars so rather than give you less, I’ll just not rate it officially. But….5 stars!!
But the Paleo diet bans more than just highly processed junk foods—in its most traditional form, it prohibits any kind of food unavailable to stone age hunter–gatherers, including dairy rich in calcium, grains replete with fiber, and vitamins and legumes packed with protein. The rationale for such constraint—in fact the entire premise of the Paleo diet—is, at best, only half correct. Because the human body adapted to life in the stone age, Paleo dieters argue—and because our genetics and anatomy have changed very little since then, they say—we should emulate the diets of our Paleo predecessors as closely as possible in order to be healthy. Obesity, heart disease, diabetes, cancer and many other "modern" diseases, the reasoning goes, result primarily from the incompatibility of our stone age anatomy with our contemporary way of eating. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QJKiugjwKlw
I found your recipes and was eager to try them! This morning I made the almond and coconut flour bread, blueberry muffin and the pancakes for family breakfast. They were all delicious!! I was amazed at how moist they were. However, even thought the bread was light, it did not achieve the height shown with the recipe. I need advice on how to achieve a higher loaf. My family was delighted at the healthier version of our Sunday morning breakfast. Thank you, Maya, for the time and effort spent in perfecting and sharing your recipes.
Just made this, thank you for the recipe! My loaf pans were too wide so I used 6 Texas size muffin tins and they came out great. I used maple syrup instead of honey because, well, I live in Vermont and my husband sugars. I am fairly new to Paleo and I’ve been an avid baker for decades-I miss baking! I will experiment with this recipe for sure, using it as a base. The first thing I am imagining is lemon poppy seed and baking them in mini muffin tins. Or baking in a cast iron skillet in the oven like corn bread. And maybe a morning glory version. Oooh my world just opened up. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIWMOrBumSk
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Evolutionary biologist Marlene Zuk writes that the idea that our genetic makeup today matches that of our ancestors is misconceived, and that in debate Cordain was "taken aback" when told that 10,000 years was "plenty of time" for an evolutionary change in human digestive abilities to have taken place.[4]:114 On this basis Zuk dismisses Cordain's claim that the paleo diet is "the one and only diet that fits our genetic makeup".[4] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cwP8C9wjYaY
In general, the paleo diet involves eating nutrient-rich real foods, such as meat, fish, nuts, eggs, vegetables, and fruits. It’s best to choose grass-fed and pasture-raised meats, and organic produce whenever possible. The paleo lifestyle removes refined sugars, grains, legumes, dairy, and unhealthy fats and oils from your diet, as well as highly processed foods. (Read more about the paleo diet on HealthLine and EatingWell.)
I love love love love!!! This recipe. My only questions are how should I store the bread? And how long should it last without spoiling? I made a loaf on Sunday evening and kept it in an airtight container on my counter. By Friday morning (or maybe even before because I hadn’t eaten it for a day or so) it was ripe. Smelled like something was fermenting. Any tips? Maybe I should have stored it in the fridge.

I have done this many times in many different ways. I used a regular size muffins pan and make dinner rolls for the holidays. English muffins rings for burger size buns, and whoopee pie pans for slider size buns. I use a standard size ice cream scoop for the rolls and slider buns (1 level scoop) and 2 scoops for the larger burger buns. Usually bake rolls and sliders for 20-25 minutes and for the bigger buns, start checking them at 25-30 minutes. Hope this encourages you to experiment,


Cordain admits that meat leads to plaque and increases cholesterol where plants wouldn’t. And science establishes that plaque and cholesterol lead to heart attacks and strokes. But Cordain argues that plaque alone is insufficient to cause harm. Rather, it is plaque combined with inflammation that causes heart attacks and strokes. So avoid acid, salt, legumes, wheat, starchy vegetables, dairy, oil, fatty meats, and grains because they cause inflammation. But if both science and Cordain agree that plaque is a necessary part of the heart-disease equation—and that meat causes plaque—why should we follow Paleo rather than just forgo meat?
This is my second time making this bread! First time I didn’t use golden flaxseed meal so the color was little darker ( and I didn’t like the one I got from Trader Joe’s ) . Second time I used Bob’s golden flaxseed meal and color and flavor was much better!!! But both time it didn’t rise like your bread. My yeast was nice and bubbly. Only thing I can think of is my Psyllium Husk was whole not power. Does that make a difference? I did grind it up but it wasn’t powder like. Another thing I read in the other comments was the kitchen not being warm enough. I don’t think my kitchen wasn’t warm enough so next time I’ll try it on top of my oven!
Of course Wikipedia has a page on the Paleolithic Diet. It is quite thorough. It also isn't clear about the lean/fatty meat debate between the followers of Loren Cordain and a slew of others, and pushes lean meat. It is weak on the variations of the diet. Then it restricts fermented beverages. Even butterflies eat fermented fruit. Why wouldn't our paleo ancestors also?

I’ve lived with food intolerances for about 30 years so I’m happy experimenting with all sorts of different ingredients. However, I’ve recently realised I have a problem with gluten and whilst I can make breads such as this one successfully I’ve never found a substitute that gives me the elasticity of gluten (I am unable to eat gluten free flour and having found out the ingredient that gives it the elasticity I no longer want to eat it). Have you ever found a flour or a combination of ingredients that gives the elasticity to make something like pitta bread? May I say that I wish I’d had access to your blog, ideas and cook books 30 years ago, they’re fantastic and my life would have been so much easier. Thank you for making the time to both experiment and share your ideas with others. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SQHKYa_Zsvw
First off, i did this recipe totally every perfect way. Even had a warmer house. Everything was room temperature and even used the ginger and cream of tartar. I live in Kansas City so NO high elevation. My bread did not rise even near double. Maybe 1/3 it’s size and that took foreverrrrrr. Then after it was done, it sunk in half. Extremely flat bread. About 3” high. I’m so disgusted of all these new ingredients i bought for this. $75. All for nothing. I dont think i would waste my time again. I have used a few other recipes from gnom gnom and they turned out pretty good. This is a total fail. And I followed it perfectly. Even read all the other reviews. Very sad!
Thanks Kaylie. I used the ingredients I had at hand so that is why I did what I did. Can I eliminate the maple syrup without loosing something? Don’t like the sweet taste. I will try the other recipe first and let you know how I make out. Thanks for getting back to me. We need everyone’s expertise. Glad you like my adventurous spirit….making mistakes is just so much fun!!! :^)

Actually, I m not talking about Wheat flour. I suggested Vital Wheat Gluten and Wheat Protein Isolate. Which are low in carbs. Vital Wheat Gluten is 4g carbs per 1/4 cup and Wheat Protein Isolate is 2 to 3g per 1/4 cup. There is actually Low Carb bread being sold out there with these ingredients now. And, Oat Fiber actually has zero carbs. So, it is Keto. Especially, that you really don’t need to use much during baking. Most used would be Almond or Coconut Flour. I am doing Keto to loose weight and get back in shape. I have no Gluten allergies. So, for those that do, this isn’t a good choice, but it is for me.
Evolution of the Human Diet: The Known, the Unknown, and the Unknowable by Peter S. Ungar. Diet is key to understanding the ecology and evolution of our distant ancestors and their kin, the early hominins. A study of the range of foods eaten by our progenitors underscores just how unhealthy many of our diets are today. This volume brings together authorities from disparate fields to offer new insights into the diets of our ancestors. Paleontologists, archaeologists, primatologists, nutritionists and other researchers all contribute pieces to the puzzle. The book has four sections: Reconstructed diets based on hominin fossils--tooth size, shape, structure, wear, and chemistry, mandibular biomechanics. Archaeological evidence of subsistence--stone tools and modified bones. Models of early hominin diets based on the diets of living primates--both human and non-human, paleoecology, and energetics. Nutritional analyses and their implications for evolutionary medicine. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LssXGFdueFM
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