Jazzmin, you are correct and the active cultures in the yogurt will not survive during baking. However, the reason why I mentioned those facts about yogurt on my post is because a lot of people following a paleo diet simply won’t eat dairy because at one point dairy was classified as “not paleo”. There are so many amazing health benefits from eating fermented foods and raw, organic dairy from pasture raised animals that I feel it is important to educate people.
I had the same effect but I used the same pan. The issue I had was the egg whites. I beat them with a mixer for 2 minutes with the cream of tartar and still couldn’t get them whipped. I’d say they were half whipped. I gave up and put them in the loan pan anyway. The bread looked the same and tasted great but it was somewhat spongy. I’m wondering if the egg whites really wouldn’t whip because I didn’t realize they had to be room temp. The bread is great but it won’t hold up for sandwiches. Any tips on egg whipping? I felt egg defeated today!

Baking with almond flour can sometimes be tricky and not all brands give you the same results. Actually, the one you cited is my least favorite and usually makes baked goods sink in the middle, get very dense and also crumbly. I highly suggest you use one of the brands of blanched almond flour I recommend. My favorites are by Honeyville, Welbee’s and Nuts(.com). Here’s Welbee’s on Amazon for $23 for 2 LB http://amzn.to/1M5cDzG
Hello Elana: I have been a Paleo girl for about 8 months and am thoroughly enjoying the hunting and gathering! Today I was cooking turkey and wanted to adapt my stuffing recipe and found your Paleo bread recipe. Thanks so much. It works well with my other ingredients, mushrooms, onion, parsnips, celery, jalapeño and sausages, spicey pepper and summer savory and of course coconut oil. Can’t wait till dinner time.

As for the preface to it, could you be more snarky? People are curious and not every place in the world has Celtic sea salt or coconut flour easily accessible. Given that you try every minute substitution, it makes me wonder if you tried Celtic sea salt vs. Gaelic sea salt. Geez, woman, lighten up and realize that people are just tapping into your wisdom. Who knows? Maybe you tried the substitution they were asking about and you can tell them how it worked out.


Love, love, love! I make a double batch and freeze them with great results. I toast these rolls for all kinds of sandwiches including toasted with bacon, egg, avocado for breakfast. Recently I started sprinkling Trader Joe’s Everything but the Bagel Sesame Seasoning Blend on the tops before baking. Toasted with butter is a great substitute for bagels or hard rolls. Thank you Lexi for such a great recipe! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iuUucqQDQ7o
We Want to Live: The Primal Diet (2005 Expanded Edition) is a book by Aajonus Vonderplanitz. His basic philosophy is that (a) food is to be eaten in a live, raw condition; and (b) a diet rich in raw fats and raw meats from natural sources is essential to health. However his diet includes massive amounts of raw dairy. From the Planets is a book review by Ralph W. Moss. The Live-Food Mailing List discusses the concepts of this book.
Ostensibly, Grok is "a rather typical hunter–gatherer" living before the dawn of agriculture—an "official primal prototype." He is the poster-persona for fitness author and blogger Mark Sisson's "Primal Blueprint"—a set of guidelines that "allows you to control how your genes express themselves in order to build the strongest, leanest, healthiest body possible, taking clues from evolutionary biology (that's the primal part)." These guidelines incorporate many principles of what is more commonly known as the Paleolithic, or caveman, diet, which started to whet people's appetites as early as the 1960s and is available in many different flavors today. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JaMQfQK1_i8

Diane, I have successfully made this recipe with almond “milk” and cow’s milk (both whole milk and 2% milk work), but I haven’t tried this recipe with hemp milk or coconut milk. If you want to play with it, I would try hemp milk because the higher fat content of coconut milk may significantly alter the recipe. If you give it a try, let me know how it goes!
Hi Claudia, unfortunately, more almond butter won’t thicken the bars the way that coconut flour will. You *might* be able to use almond flour, but proceed with caution since almond flour is MUCH less absorbent than coconut flour. Start with 3/4 cup almond flour and experiment until you get the consistency you like (basically, they should be thick and dense enough to cut through.) So sorry to hear about your possible allergy to coconut. 🙁 Big hugs. xo
The Hiwi gather and hunt a diverse group of plants and animals from the savannas, forests, rivers and swamps. Their main sources of meat are capybara, collared peccary, deer, anteater, armadillo, and feral cattle, numerous species of fish, and at least some turtle species. Less commonly consumed animals include iguanas and savanna lizards, wild rabbits, and many birds. Not exactly the kind of meat Paleo dieters and others in urban areas can easily obtain.

“I only have a full size loaf pan, and did as someone else mentioned, increased the recipe by .5 (for the eggs did 8 eggs rather than 7), and it came out the perfect size and absolutely delicious. Looking forward to enjoying it the rest of the week. I used a glass full size loaf and cooked for 40 minutes at 350 degrees. I topped it with extra flax seeds because I too love the nutty flavor of flax.”
Thanks for reading this post. Of these recipes, pick one that sounds good to, and try it. These are all good recipes and fairly easy to make, I like to make the Cheesy Tapioca Flatbread, as its pretty quick and tastes great. I’ve got lots of paleo resources and recipes on here, so click around to find out more about paleo. Keep me posted on how things go and always feel free to share a story or ask a question.
I just made it using all the the optional ingredients but I didn’t have a food processor so I whipped/mixed everything by hand. One thing I noticed is that the top of the bread cracked unevenly. Could I have over fluffed the egg whites? Maybe creating an artificial cut in the middle could solve that next time? It rose very well and nearly doubled in size, though the size is still a bit small for my liking. I will most likely use 1.5x the amount next time. It smells great and I’m about to chow down on this! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I0TMQ87vA9E
My husband and I just started paleo at the beginning of the year and we both knew that giving up bread would be hard. Probably harder for my husband who is a steak bread and potatoe type of guy. We both absolutely loved it. I will have to double the recipe but as for this loaf he added a little butter and honey and said it was extremely filling. Thanks again
Hey Deena, I also live in Kansas City and I’ve made this bread 2 times, also making it right now. The first time it came out perfect. The second time it didn’t rise as mush as the first but the bread was still better then any other. I always make sure the house is (hot) and everything is done by the stove 😉 I make it when no one is home but me… You can do it!!
Anna, I haven’t tried making this bread without the vinegar, so I don’t know for sure how the recipe would fare without it. Vinegar here is used not only for the right flavor, but also to react with the leavening agent and create the proper rise for the bread. If you take out the vinegar, you’ll need to replace it with another acid. Can you tolerate lemon juice? If so, I’d try this recipe using 2 to 3 teaspoons of fresh lemon juice in place of the vinegar. Let me know how it goes if you give it a try!

In William Calvin's The Ascent of Mind, Chapter 8 he discusses why he thinks that the Acheulian hand-ax (the oldest of the fancy stone tools of Homo erectus) was really a "killer frisbee." He argues that natural selection for throwing accuracy, which requires brain machinery, is the evolutionary scenario for bootstrapping higher intellectual functions. There are many more articles about evolution and human development throughout William's extensive site, though much of it these days is on climate change. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kKzqFQA9NTc
A special note on dairy: I made this bread with dairy (butter and greek plain yogurt) so technically some people would go against it being called Paleo. With the knowladge we now have today we should know that there are many benefits to consuming dairy made from organic grass fed animals. Butter is an extremely good source of fat and loaded with vitamin A, D and K, and Conjugated Linoleic Acid. Yogurt contains live and active bacteria that are beneficial and keep your digestive system clean and provide food for the friendly bacteria that reside there. On top of that, the live active probiotic bacteria in yogurt can rev up your immune system and reduce your risk of yeast infection, prevent allergy symptoms and naturally increase your metabolism. Not all yogurts are made the same though, so you need to look for these words on the label:  “contain active cultures”, “active yogurt cultures”, or “living yogurt cultures”.
It’s easy to find more guidance online, but a book also makes a handy reference. "The Paleo Diet," for example, outlines basic Paleo principles and offers three “levels” that allow for different degrees of cheating – three “open meals” per week on the “entry level” plan, two on “maintenance” and just one on “maximal.” Depending on the level, you might also get “transitional” condiments (low-fat dressing and salsa) and drinks (coffee, beer or wine in moderation) to wash down the meat and plants. You can use the levels as you like. Start with the first and move gradually to the more restrictive – or just stay put. For more dramatic changes, head right to the third.
If dinner has no dessert, is it really a meal? Hell no! But when you’re following a Paleo diet, it can feel like there’s a real lack of dessert options. Don’t stress, sweet fiends, we’ve got you covered. Yes, certain foods aren’t part of the Paleo plate, but that doesn’t mean you’re entering a time without treats. We’ve rounded up some of the best Paleo-friendly desserts to satisfy your prehistoric sweet tooth. So stock up on staples like almond and coconut flours and coconut oil because these desserts are so tasty, you'll want to eat at least one daily.
The Paleolithic or “Paleo” diet seeks to address 21st century ills by revisiting the way humans ate during the Paleolithic era more than 2 million years ago. Paleo proponents state that because our genetics and anatomy have changed very little since the Stone Age, we should eat foods available during that time to promote good health. Our predecessors used simple stone tools that were not advanced enough to grow and cultivate plants, so they hunted, fished, and gathered wild plants for food. If they lived long enough, they were believed to experience less modern-day diseases like diabetes, cancer, and heart disease because of a consistent diet of lean meats and plant foods along with a high level of physical activity from intensive hunting. However, the life expectancy of our predecessors was only a fraction of that of people today.

On Wednesday, April 26, 2017 my daughter and I drove to Julian Bakery in Oceanside. It is in a business park and easy to locate. They have a small storefront bakery where they have a few items out to purchase, the bread is actually in the back, and I assume so is most of their other items. They bake on Monday and Tuesday, which is why I chose to go on Wednesday. I wanted freshly made bread and all the bread at the other stores must be kept in the freezer because they are moist and would spoil too quickly otherwise. March 24 I was diagnosed with stage three breast cancer and found out from David Getoff’s website that Paleo bread was the only bread that he would recommend if you HAD to have bread. There are no grains used in Paleo bread and they use Stevia if a sweetener is needed. The bread is more like a banana nut or zucchini bread, moist. It does well in the toaster, but I like the moistness of the bread and sometimes it in plain. (Grains, including all rice, potatoes, etc. turn rapidly into sugar which is BAD for people with cancer. Cancer cells have 9500 receptor sites, while normal cells only have four. Sugar keeps the body in an acid state, which is how cancer can expand so rapidly. ALL microwaved foods turn acidic. Anything fried has a pH level of 4 and below (BAD). Cancer LOVES sugar and fat. So my diet has changed. You can store the bread in the frig for up to 4 weeks. It freezes for about twelve months. The bread is organic and non-gmo. I have been eating mostly organic for quite awhile now and now that I REALLY need to change my diet . . . I will be coming to the Julian Bakery MUCH more in the future!! Elizabeth is a wonderful help, very informative! (She is NOT the person that you speak to on the phone – that person is in another building, in customer service.) This is a little out of the way for me (35 minute drive) but well worth it!! Thank you Julian Bakery!! They also have things for Pegan and something else, but I did not really pay attention because I have to go Paleo . . . 🙂
Fresh fruits, fresh vegetables, fresh meat—the paleo diet is all about eating foods straight from the Earth just as our ancestors did. Those ancestors didn't have livestock or crops to call their own, so Cordain advises to go with grass-fed and organic varieties whenever possible to limit exposure to pesticides, antibiotics, and other chemicals that didn't exist back then. Research from Emory University suggests that Paleolithic people obtained about 35% of their calories from fats, 35% from carbohydrates, and 30% from protein. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wc5zUK2MKNY
Using sweet potatoes as your base ingredients serves a few purposes. First, it makes it so you don’t have to use a wheat or grain source as the main ingredient. Second, it provides plenty of antioxidants and vitamin support from the sweet potatoes, as well as additional fiber. You’ll still want to get a serving of vegetables in with your meal, as this doesn’t really cut it if you’re having a nice portion of meat with it. Think green leafy vegetables in a salad and you’ve got a nice balanced Paleo meal.
By latest count, about 800 Hiwi live in palm thatched huts in Colombia and Venezuela. In 1990 Ana Magdalena Hurtado and Kim Hill—now both at Arizona State University in Tempe—published a thorough study (pdf) of the Hiwi diet in the neotropical savannas of the Orinoco River basin in Southwestern Venezuela. Vast grasslands with belts of forest, these savannas receive plenty of rain between May and November. From January through March, however, precipitation is rare: the grasses shrivel, while lakes and lagoons evaporate. Fish trapped in shrinking pools of water are easy targets for caiman, capybaras and turtles. In turn, the desiccating lakes become prime hunting territory for the Hiwi. During the wet season, however, the Hiwi mainly hunt for animals in the forest, using bows and arrows. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gEOLZpj1G8g
I ran out of coconut oil last week and my replacement doesn’t arrive until tomorrow. Desperate to try this I used canolia oil instead. I acknowledge that it’s properties are very different than coconut oil. That said, the bread is fantastic, a bit oily (but I bet that is the fault of my decision), and the taste is really eggy almost like french toast. I also lack a food processor so I mixed it all by hand after sifting the flours together.

Overall, the diet is high in protein, moderate in fat (mainly from unsaturated fats), low-moderate in carbohydrate (specifically restricting high glycemic index carbohydrates), high in fiber, and low in sodium and refined sugars. [2] The monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats (including the omega-3 fats EPA and DHA) come from marine fish, avocado, olive oil, and nuts and seeds.
One question, when I released this bread out of the pan there was a very strong ammonia smell coming from the bread. After it cooled this ammonia smell was gone. I’m just curious what could cause that odor? Is it a reaction from the almond flour? I was just caught off guard when I bent over to get a whiff of the freshly baked loaf and it smelled of ammonia! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OxF2u_3URxs
I have a problem, Im hoping someone here can help me with! I have a wheat allergy, very lactose intolerant, allergic to chick peas, and also sensitive to most other grains (rice flour is one the safe ones). I really thought the paleo diet would be able to help me, but Ive bought a cookbook, and look on various sites and most of the recipes call for coconut flour, coconut oil, coconut aminos, coconut crystals, or coconut milk; and I have a bad intolerance to coconut! Its not an allergy, but it will make me very uncomfortable for at least a cpl hours! I saw one question that was brought up, that said that almond flour and coconut flour are used for different reasons and connot be interchanged, so is there anything out there that can be used in replace of coconut oil, coconut flour, coconut aminos, and coconut crystals that will still make the recipes come out good?

Finally found the recommended loaf size and could hardly wait to make this paleo bread. After 45 minutes and the toothpick coming out clean, removed it from the oven. After it cooled, cut it to serve and had two inches on either end and about a half an inch on the top and bottom that were edible. The middle consisted of what I would call an empty tunnel about the size of a silver dollar and surrounded by uncooked batter. Yuck. What’s so interesting is I made your Scrumptious Sandwich bread out of your book, and it turned out perfectly. I’ve been baking a LONG time, and I can’t even speculate as to what happened to this loaf. Did I have a massive air bubble in the middle, and, if so, why? Did using the food processor affect it? Any light you can shed on this will be greatly appreciated. I’ve been experimenting with the recipes in this cookbook and loving it. Please help me understand what happened to this paleo bread.


This bread is the answer to my DH’s love for toast in the mornings! I LOVE the flavour of this bread, although it is a little salty for me (I’m cutting back a little with each loaf I make). My only issue is rising…but reading through the comments I think it’s the temp of my home (Canada) and I need to give it a warmer environment to actually double in size. I tried my oven (heat off), and the top of my oven as it was pre-heating….no luck. Any other colder-climate-cooks suggest options? TIA! XO
Hi, i love your blog and recipes! Just starting in Paleo with no grains and sugar at all for a month(being a Celiac for year and a half). I did the recipe with no Flax seeds just replace it using more coconut flour and used applesauce instead honey. The result look very different from your picture and has a strong egg flavor. I am thinking using jam instead applesauce next time and using more almond flour than coconut, any advices? Thanks!

We cannot time travel and join our Paleo ancestors by the campfire as they prepare to eat; likewise, shards of ancient pottery and fossilized teeth can tell us only so much. If we compare the diets of so-called modern hunter-gatherers, however, we see just how difficult it is to find meaningful commonalities and extract useful dietary guidelines from their disparate lives (see infographic). Which hunter–gatherer tribe are we supposed to mimic, exactly? How do we reconcile the Inuit diet—mostly the flesh of sea mammals—with the more varied plant and land animal diet of the Hadza or !Kung? Chucking the many different hunter–gather diets into a blender to come up with some kind of quintessential smoothie is a little ridiculous. "Too often modern health problems are portrayed as the result of eating 'bad' foods that are departures from the natural human diet…This is a fundamentally flawed approach to assessing human nutritional needs," Leonard wrote. "Our species was not designed to subsist on a single, optimal diet. What is remarkable about human beings is the extraordinary variety of what we eat. We have been able to thrive in almost every ecosystem on the Earth, consuming diets ranging from almost all animal foods among populations of the Arctic to primarily tubers and cereal grains among populations in the high Andes.” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cwQgjq0mCdE


Sounds like your baking soda is old and/or spoiled. It explains the lack of rise, tingling tongue, chemical taste (washing soda [sodium carbonate, I think] is made by heating baking soda [sodium bicarbonate] in big ovens), and maybe the extra salty flavor, too. I’ve had bad baking soda spoil baked goods, and it’s a real bummer. Hope you try again, though. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k_JUritU2IE

You don’t often equate coconuts as being savory, but there are a few things in play here that get this to work. The use of coconut flour replaces the typical wheat-based flour used in most store bought bread. The savory comes from a combination of flax meal, sea salt, and olive oil. Coconut flour provides the right texture and helps this taste like a bread, and is one of the more popular flours used in Paleo baking because it has more of a light and airy taste and feel to it. Since it is derived from coconuts no grains are harmed in the process. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bN_xst3yvKw
As paleo guru Robb Wolf puts it, think of a 100-yard football field. The first 99.5 yards are how long Homo-Sapiens spent as hunter-gatherers. As they became REALLY good at hunting and gathering our bodies adapted to that lifestyle over thousands of years. That last half-yard represents our species after the agricultural revolution, where our diet has shifted (but our genetics haven’t).
You’ve gotta love the folks over at TGIPaleo, they really know their stuff and it seems they’re always tinkering around in the caveman kitchens trying to whip up palatable Paleo food that keeps you within the Paleo guidelines. Here they’re doing their best to perfect the art of Paleo bread making, and they seem to have gotten it right on this one. Just to be sure they’ve gone and replicated their efforts in second version, covered below. They’ve used a combination of coconut flour, ground flax for heartiness, fiber and omega-3s, and arrowroot flour for added texture and taste.

I think red meat from grain fed cattle and sheep IS bad for us . These animals were designed to eat grass. We were designed to eat meat, fat, vegetables , a few seeds and a little seasonal fruit. But never any kind of grain. ! When Man began farming and grain consumption , so began disease and illness. Today our food supply is being contaminated by Factory farming and GMOs. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fi7YlHwBoBQ
The Dietitian's Guide to Eating Bugs by Daniel Calder is a comprehensive guide to the nutritional content of insects. He believes insect breeding and consumption are important elements sustainable living, particularly when it comes to complementing foraged plant material with meat products. Numerous insects contain nutrients similar to those found in more conventional livestock, except the feed to conversion ratio is much higher and they're much cheaper to breed. You can find the book at scribd. Also available in e-book format for $35. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=--BtnfD9RmE
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