I cannot even tell you how happy I am right now. Just had a toasted ham sandwich. The average human will not understand my excitement at this but I know you all do. Made the recipe as directed but subbed baking powder for baking soda as one poster recommended to avoid using honey. The loaf was beautiful and never fell a single fraction when it cooled. Delicious!!! Not sweet at all. Tasted like multigrain sandwich bread. So thankful to have found this recipe!
Paleo baked goods are free of gluten, refined sugars, and dairy. If you’ve perfected regular baking and now you’ve gone paleo, you might be surprised at just how different this way of baking is. I find that in order to get the closest simulation of regular bread (i.e., bread that has gluten), it’s often useful to use a combination of a few different paleo-friendly flours.
I make three loaves of Paleo 2.0 bread and Paleo Rye bread every two weeks and they both freeze well. Thanks for these recipes. All of our children and grandchildren love them. We are moving from Illinois to Colorado Springs and are worried that the high altitude will create problems. Hoping that we will find by testing how to recreate these delicious breads.
Thank you so much for this recipe! I’ve made it several times and I love it for myself. I have tried many versions: coconut oil, ghee, butter, coconut cream, refrigerated coconut milk from a can, shaken (after a couple of days in the fridge) and full fat yogurt. I always beat my eggs for 2-3 minutes (by hand) until very frothy before adding the wet ingredients then beat them again after incorporating wet ingredients to get them thick. Although I like them all, I have had the best results for rising (and actual ‘bread-like’ texture and loft) from coconut oil and yogurt. My husband eats gluten-free but not paleo so when his favourite GF bread was out at the store he was stuck (he’s a ‘must eat sandwich for lunch’ guy and we’ve tried all the GF varieties in our store, some of them complete rocks!). I offered to make him a loaf and he accepted (he’s had this loaf before but felt it’s texture was more like a banana bread or zucchini bread than sandwich material). I got rave reviews from him today about the bread for his sandwich (made with coconut oil and yogurt). Total convert!!
Wow – great bread recipe, let alone paleo! Thank you! After reading other posts I doubled the recipe and whipped my egg whites to soft peaks, folding in gently at the end. Didn’t have enough flax so used combo of chia and flax. This made 2 good sized, lovely light high topped loaves, topped with nigella and sesame seeds (reminiscent of my favourite turkish bread from the old days). What an amazing taste and texture this bread has – will experiment with it now – I think it will be yummy with some fresh rosemary chopped and folded through or maybe lemon thyme and goats cheese feta…..
I had an awful experience with the recommended Magic Line loaf pan. The uncoated “natural” aluminum this pan is made of can dissolve and leach into food that contains acidic ingredients. I’ve been using anodized aluminum cookware for years to prevent this from happening, and I should have known better, but I ordered the pan from Amazon anyway because I wanted the little square slices.
TBK Fitness Program by Tamir Katz shows how to achieve fitness through a healthy, natural hunter-gatherer diet along with a comprehensive exercise program with over 60 different bodyweight exercises of varying difficulty targeting all of the muscles in the body. Also included is a detailed discussion of nutrition and the diseases of civilization based on scientific research, information on stress management and preventive medicine, recommendations on vitamin and supplement use, tips on how to make your fitness program succeed where others have failed, tips on food shopping and preparation, sample meals, and more. The Amazon reviews average to 4+ stars.
4. Raw food is for the birds (too much of it, anyway). There’s paleo, and then there’s the raw diet. Folks who eat raw tout the health benefits of the approach, saying that they’re accessing the full, complete nutrients available because they’re not heating, and thus destroying, their dinner. But that’s simply wrong. We cook to get our hands on more nutrients, not fewer. According to Wrangham, the one thing absolutely all cultures have in common is that they cook their food. He points out that women who move towards 100 percent raw diets often stop ovulating, because even if in theory they’re tossing sufficient food into the blender to fulfill their caloric needs, they simply can’t absorb enough from the uncooked food.
Argh! I’ve literally made 4 different recipes today for yeast free/gluten free breads, and every last one has been a fail. This one is in the oven as I write (please let it be good!). I had to sub a flour because hubby can’t have almond products so I will keep that in mind if it’s not perfect, but seems to at least have potential. I also only had duck eggs, which are large, so used 3 instead of 4 (can’t have chicken eggs either). I will let you know how it turned out! Thanks for the recipe!
Hahaha. That’s why we’re besties. We staunchly refuse to follow the times. ???? Now what’s this all about floral curtains? Do you have a set picked out for me? Lolol. I’ve never tried Justin’s vanilla AB. But now I’m super intrigued! Yes on the overheating–AB takes a lot longer than you would think. I will label at least 100 of these cookies for you. 😉 Love ya more! <3 <3 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FHhthf8B-xk
Paleonutrition by Mark Q. Sutton, Kristin D. Sobolik, and Jill K. Gardner is the analysis of prehistoric human diets and the interpretation of dietary intake in relation to health and nutrition. This is a substantial text that combines background to paleonutrition, an extensive bibliography, a discussion on methods, and case studies. Published February 23, 2010.
Elizabeth, This recipe is a bit heavy on the eggs because they add structure here; without them, it would be difficult to get the same height without doing quite a bit of experimentation to find a suitable substitute. If you’re looking for a paleo-friendly bread-type of recipe, my Paleo Flatbread may be more useful. It’s more of a wrap or can be made thinner into a crepe, rather than a loaf of bread, but it is delicious. That recipe uses one egg, but I’ve successfully made it using a flax “egg” instead of a regular egg. Sorry I’m not able to be more help, but I hope you like the flatbread if you give it a try! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aDs5M-i4GOA
We made the mix as directed. We then mixed 1/2 cup coconut sugar and 1 Tablespoon cinnamon in a separate container. Pour 1/2 of the bread mix in the pan, followed by 1/2 of the cinnamon/sugar mix. Then put the rest of the bread mix in the pan and cover with the rest of the cinnamon/sugar mix. Then swirl with a knife. Great bread for having with stew or soup! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mybgoG_DHZk
I’ve been thinking about bringing paleo-friendly bread and rolls to LCK for some time now. But I knew before I did that I needed to make sure they fit specific criteria. They need the right flavor and fluffy, soft, air-y, bread-like texture. You see, I’ve never bothered buying gluten-free breads in the store. I never thought it was worth it because I always felt they were dense, not the right flavor, etc.
The evolutionary discordance is incomplete, since it is based mainly on the genetic understanding of the human diet and a unique model of human ancestral diets, without taking into account the flexibility and variability of the human dietary behaviors over time.[27] Studies of a variety of populations around the world show that humans can live healthily with a wide variety of diets, and that in fact, humans have evolved to be flexible eaters.[28] Lactose tolerance is an example of how some humans have adapted to the introduction of dairy into their diet. While the introduction of grains, dairy, and legumes during the Neolithic revolution may have had some adverse effects on modern humans, if humans had not been nutritionally adaptable, these technological developments would have been dropped.[29]
Thank you for taking care of us who need your recipes! I recently found out that tapioca comes from the cassava plant and that is where they get cyanide from, so I know longer eat it and found out that I was allergic to it. If its not refined enough, it is a problem for many people who eat it and don’t know why they don’t feel good. You might want to consider not using it or xanthan gum or guar gum in any of your recipes either. They come from Pakistan and India and cause stomach distress in many people as they are a bean. Guar gum is used in oil fracking so it’s really not a great ingredient to be putting into food either!
Argh! I’ve literally made 4 different recipes today for yeast free/gluten free breads, and every last one has been a fail. This one is in the oven as I write (please let it be good!). I had to sub a flour because hubby can’t have almond products so I will keep that in mind if it’s not perfect, but seems to at least have potential. I also only had duck eggs, which are large, so used 3 instead of 4 (can’t have chicken eggs either). I will let you know how it turned out! Thanks for the recipe!

How many eggs did you use when you increased it by 50%? I had a mini loaf pan that was 3 1/2″ by 6″ It came put great but when I got to the center of the loaf I did find a small spot that was still raw dough. Not enough to ruin the loaf though. I used a combination of Bob’s Red Mill almond flour and King Arthur almond flour. Anxious to try it in a full sized loaf pan though if I can figure out how many eggs to use.
Elana, is the honey used for sweetening in a Paleo-friendly way or to work as an acidic ingred. along with the ACV to activate the baking soda? I generally use coconut palm sugar syrup in place of agave and honey. I did so in this recipe as well but it came out a little bit dense, like a leavening issue. If you say the honey’s just to sweeten, I’ll adjust the leavening issue on my end by experimenting with other options. Otherwise I’ll use honey next time and see if that helps. The bread is fabulous regardless! Thanks!

This is really good. I only use 3 eggs,. I didn’t have any arrowroot powder, so I used cornstarch instead. I used lemon juice instead of ACV because ACV gives me migraines and I used coconut cream (don’t like yogurt). It tasted a bit like sweet bread, but it made an excellent sandwich. It didn’t rise like the picture. I’m sure it because of the substitutions I made. I always make sandwiches cutting the bread in half anyway so it didn’t matter that it didn’t rise as high as the picture shows. This will be my go to bread for now on. Oh yeah. I baked it for 45 minutes instead of 25. Ovens temperatures and climates varies for baking. I always baked paleo breads on 350 degrees for 45 minutes. It comes out perfect every time. Thank you so much for posted this recipe.

Closely examining one group of modern hunter–gatherers—the Hiwi—reveals how much variation exists within the diet of a single small foraging society and deflates the notion that hunter–gatherers have impeccable health. Such examination also makes obvious the immense gap between a genuine community of foragers and Paleo dieters living in modern cities, selectively shopping at farmers' markets and making sure the dressing on their house salad is gluten, sugar and dairy free. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mJK74-LC4hE
The Primal Blueprint Cookbook: Primal, Low Carb, Paleo, Grain-Free, Dairy-Free and Gluten-Free by Mark Sisson and Jennifer Meier. Recipes include: Roasted Leg of Lamb with Herbs and Garlic, Salmon Chowder with Coconut Milk, Tomatoes Stuffed with Ground Bison and Eggs, and Baked Chocolate Custard. Recipes are simple and have limited ingredients. Complaints are the book is stuffed with unnecessary photos and proofreading could have been better, e.g. oven temperatures were left out. And recipes are not truly paleo. Despite what is on the cover dairy is used in some recipes. The Amazon reviews average to 4+ stars.

So.. let’s talk about the needed part. Quick, what’s the one thing you can’t live without, food wise? That you NEED!! Here’s what I hear a lot when I explain the Paleo or grain free style of eating. “Oh my Goodness, how can I live without bread or a good sandwich bread?” Well ya, bread is so delicious and I don’t always make paleo bread, but when I do, it’s usually for a good reason.
I just used a 9 x 5 pan and did not change the recipe proportions at all. Since this is the only loaf pan I have, instead, I pushed the dough against one side of the pan and formed a small loaf that is closer to the 7.5 x 3.5 pan size that Elana says to use. The dough was sticky enough to hold together fine and did not collapse or spread out during baking. It’s not the most beautiful creation, but it’s proportioned OK and tastes fine. I say – make it work with what you have and you’ll be alright.

Thank you so much for this recipe. I’ve made this recipe and your simple bread recipe and both came out perfect right from the start. I did follow the recipes EXACTLY, except for the fact that I don’t have a food processor so I had to “pulse” by hand which led me to believe that I had to stir in ingredients in large minimal swoops being careful not to over mix. Wondering if that is what other people had done when they’ve made this recipe without a food processor? As I said, it came out perfectly. just wondering if I was just lucky.
In order to simulate a bread-like texture without using gluten, grain free and gluten free bread recipes often use a variety of different flours and binders. We’ve tried so many keto bread recipes that taste way too eggy or too much like almonds or coconut. The trick is to find a combination of ingredients that yields good flavor, as well as bready texture and a loaf that rises nicely.
Hmm thanks got the answer :). My fitness pal and other nutritional sites seem to give different values. Thanks for the recipe I have been preparing this bread even before I started following Keto. And when started following keto now, was craving for bread and suddenly I reminisced a bread which was very delicious and I prepared in jiffy. I came trailing back my foot steps and landed in your website again after many months.
The digestive abilities of anatomically modern humans, however, are different from those of Paleolithic humans, which undermines the diet's core premise.[4] During the 2.6-million-year-long Paleolithic era, the highly variable climate and worldwide spread of human populations meant that humans were, by necessity, nutritionally adaptable. Supporters of the diet mistakenly presuppose that human digestion has remained essentially unchanged over time.[4][5]
My loaf came out beautifully, just like a regular loaf. The toothpick came out clean – twice! – but when I got past the third slice, the middle was hollow and the edges of the hollow area was raw.I cut it out and ate the rest, but I’m puzzled why the toothpick came out dry when it wasn’t cooked through. It is, however, the best gf bread I’ve ever had, and I will make it again. I did have to convert the temperature to Celsius, and I have a fan oven, so I will check that out.
I’ve perused your bread recipe offerings (which I hadn’t really looked at previously since we mostly just opt-out of bread-type products) and am wondering which you would most recommend as a kid-pleaser to try in the challah mold. Additionally, I am wondering if you’ve ever played around with a potato-based bread option? I would prefer something that is not entirely flour based (including nut flours), if it is possible . . . https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aH5IqMjQm7U
“I think there are a lot of positives about it,” Holley says. “It cuts out a lot of processed foods just naturally, like processed grains or added sugar through soft drinks or juice.” And because the diet promotes eating anti-inflammatory foods — like fruits, vegetables, and unsaturated fats in nuts and certain oils — your health could benefit, Holley explains. Cutting out processed foods and sugar will also help lower your risk of certain diseases, like type 2 diabetes and certain cancers, she says. (6) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GmvM6syadl0
"Every fad diet thinks it has discovered the root of all evil," says Dr. Ochner. But nutrients in legumes, whole grains, and dairy—all of which are forbidden on the paleo diet—can help to lower the risk of osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease, reduce blood pressure, and promote a healthy weight, he says. Cutting dairy, the primary source of calcium and vitamin D in modern diets, is especially worrisome for women who want to avoid osteoporosis.

In the long term, you have to be sure you’re getting calcium and other nutrients you’re missing by not having dairy products and certain grains. Some paleo-approved foods, such as salmon and spinach, contain calcium, so you have to be sure you’re including them in your diet. It would be a good idea to check with a registered dietitian, too, to make sure you’re meeting your calcium and other nutrient needs.
Saturated fat has been demonized by our health authorities and media. What is the basis for this position on Saturated fat? Are current recommendations for VERY low saturated fat intake justified? How much saturated fat (and what types), if any should one eat? Without a historical and scientific perspective these questions can be nearly impossible to answer. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cnTEnvdLl7E
Joel Runyon is the founder of Ultimate Paleo Guide and CEO of Paleo Meal Plans. He's a precision nutrition, and Gym Jones Level 1 certified, and helped millions of people get healthy and lose weight since 2012. Joel is also an ultra runner and endurance athlete - and in 2017, he became the the youngest person to run an ultra marathon on every continent in the world to build 7 schools with Pencils of Promise in developing countries.Follow him on Twitter, Instagram, Athlinks and read his full bio here.

I’ve made this in my bread machine several times, and it comes out beautifully. I double the recipe, choose the quick bread setting and it produces a nice 1 kilo loaf (2.2 pounds). I’m using a Kenwood model BM450 as I’m in the UK, but I think the same machine is marketed in the US by DeLonghi, if anyone wants to compare specifications. I just dump all the ingredients in the pan in order, and give a couple of stirs around the edges of the pan with a spatula while its on the mix cycle (though I’m not sure if its even necessary), and that’s it.
I also doubled the recipe in an attempt to make the loaf larger, because my loaf pans are bigger. After doubling, I took out enough of the batter to make 6 rolls in a muffin top pan. I filled the holes not quite to the top, then put the remaining batter into the loaf pan. It didn’t seem to help with the size of the loaf much. I may try it again using the full double batch. I added 7 minutes to my bake time for the bread and did the toothpick test. I have to say, I prefer the rolls, which I baked for 18 minutes. They are wonderful for breakfast when filled with an egg, sausage, and cheese!

Bill, my regular sized loaf pans are 9X5, and a loaf that size would require 3 cups of flour, 1 cup of water along with a little yeast, oil, salt and sugar. Before baking, the dough would be allowed to rise until doubled in volume, completely filling the pan and rising slightly over the top. This dough won’t even come close to filling that size loaf pan and it isn’t going to rise much. In fact about the best you’re going to get is that it will “puff” up a little from the reaction between the baking soda and vinegar, plus a bit more from the steam released during baking. I would suggest a much smaller loaf pan. Somewhere in the neighborhood of 6 X 3.5. Don’t be a slave to those numbers, find something close. My pans are old and some probably aren’t even being made anymore so just do what you can. Also, this recipe is going to create more of a batter than a dough, don’t leave it sit too long before putting it in the oven or the chemical reaction between the baking soda and vinegar will be all over before it even starts to bake. My suggestion is get it in the oven as soon as you can after mixing the ingredients. That way you’ll get as much rise as possible from the mixture. Good luck!
One common lament about those deciding to go on the Paleo diet is having to give up bread. But just because you can’t eat what and grains anymore doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy nice slice of bread or two, just as long as it conforms to the Paleo dietary recommendations. Here is our select list of Paleo-friendly breads that you can use for sandwiches, toast, or just to enjoy on their own.
This bread is, hands down, THE best GF/paleo bread I have ever had or made in my life. It is so simple, so easy, so perfect, and so delicious that I haven’t been able to stop staring at it, mouth agape. (Quite convenient since that makes it easier for me to continuously eat it.) With Kerry butter it is simply divine. I will never want for another quick/soda bread recipe ever again.

Coconut flour is a great alternative when you need to avoid almond flour because of a nut allergy, or for any other reason. With a couple easy tips, coconut flour can also yield delicious gluten free baked goods. Coconut flour is very high in fiber and subsequently absorbs a lot of liquid, so as a general rule, it’s recommended to use the coconut flour and liquid at the same ratio. Coconut flour can also result in very dense and/or dry and crumbly baked goods, so it’s important not to use too much coconut flour, and to use other ingredients to lighten the texture. This is why a lot of recipes that call for coconut flour also call for a lot of eggs. However, then the issue is that the baked goods have an overly eggy taste. Because of this, I prefer to use coconut flour in conjunction with other paleo-friendly flours instead of using it on its own. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tog85hxZauU
×