Hi again Adriana. I tried again yesterday, with the same flour. I added a little extra yoghurt (2/3 cup) and I also added some almond milk (I think about 1/4 cup), to make more of a batter. The bread turned out great. It’s a little moist, a bit like cake, but it tastes amazing! So I actually think that the flour reacts a bit like coconut flour and soaks up a lot of moisture.
Kim, thanks for your comment. I’ve baked this bread at both sea level and 8,000 feet and haven’t found any need for adjustments. The issue is likely the size pan that you baked the bread in. If you use the recommended size baking pan, the bread will be the proper height. If you use a pan that is bigger than the one I used, your bread will rise, but it won’t fill the pan to the right height. Here’s an example that might help –if you place 1/2 cup of water in a 1/2 measuring cup it will be 100% full to the top of the cup. If you put the same 1/2 cup of water in a 1 cup measuring cup it will only fill it 50% and will only be 1/2 full in height. That’s why a loaf pan that is too large doesn’t work for this recipe when it comes to the bread “rising” and the height of the loaf :-)
In order to simulate a bread-like texture without using gluten, grain free and gluten free bread recipes often use a variety of different flours and binders. We’ve tried so many keto bread recipes that taste way too eggy or too much like almonds or coconut. The trick is to find a combination of ingredients that yields good flavor, as well as bready texture and a loaf that rises nicely. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lM5zHcTPab0
Hi Maya, I’m new to your website and I’m anxious to try out this bread recipe. I’m helping my 27 year old son lose some weight. He’s on some pretty potent medication that has caused him to crave carbs thus putting on quite a bit of weight over the past few years. Since I’m his caregiver and also a Certified Nutritionist, I’m looking for some healthy alternatives to make his transition a bit easier and he loves bread.
Woot woot for AB bars!!! Yep I still say it. If we if we keep saying it long enough it will probably become cool again…just like floral curtains???? I appreciate how you give all the nut butters their proper chance to be showcased, no playing mess-prone goop favorites. But since today is about AB I have to admit I had an almond butter phase too actually. It was more about excessive almond butter eating though, not making???? (Have you ever tried Justin’s vanilla AB? Probs not since you make your own. But I’m pretty sure there is crack (or frosting) in there, it’s too good.) I tried making my own once, overheated the food processor, never tried again. And honestly just the thought of that goopy greasy cleanup is enough to make me run to the store…I admire your lack of baking laziness???? Buying it also means one less step between me and me shoving THESE in my face, and I am all for speeding up that!! A batch of these and the PB ones so I can do a side-by-side please! And if ever you do go back to cray 500 cookies a day BB, I call at least 50 of them, kay? Love ya❤️❤️ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jqjDrTy_n5c
Hi V. Not all my recipes need nuts or almond flour, but most my baked goods do. This is because almond flour gives the best texture. If your son is allergic to nuts I would suggest substituting the nuts for seeds, and the almond flour for pumpkin or sunflower seed flour. You can also try using a gluten-free oats flours. I haven’t made this substitution in many of my recipes, but it’s worth a try. Please let me know how it goes.
The Paleolithic Prescription: A Program of Diet & Exercise and a Design for Living by S. Boyd Eaton, M.D., Marjorie Shostak and Melvin Konner. This book, published in 1988, was the start of the Paleolithic diet movement. Its recommendations are not in line with what today is considered a paleo diet, as whole grain breads and pastas, legumes and some low fat dairy products are allowed. However, it is still a profoundly important book. Used books are available for a reasonable price.
I have done this many times in many different ways. I used a regular size muffins pan and make dinner rolls for the holidays. English muffins rings for burger size buns, and whoopee pie pans for slider size buns. I use a standard size ice cream scoop for the rolls and slider buns (1 level scoop) and 2 scoops for the larger burger buns. Usually bake rolls and sliders for 20-25 minutes and for the bigger buns, start checking them at 25-30 minutes. Hope this encourages you to experiment,
Weigh your ingredients. This will forever be a staple recommendation for any sort of gluten free baking here at gnom-gnom. As aside from leading to less dirty dishes, it will ensure consistent results time and time again. Remember that gluten free (and particularly keto) baking is notoriously finicky, and measuring by cups is anything but accurate. And if you don’t own a baking scale, measure with cups by dropping the ingredients onto them rather than scooping them out (which often leads to overpacking).
Proof the yeast. This involves mixing dry active yeast with water that’s just warm to touch (between 105-110°F to be precise) and maple syrup or honey for 7 minutes until foamy. And before you scream sugar (!!) remember that the yeast will feed on such sugar to emit carbon dioxide, so it doesn’t affect the carb count at all. And yes, this is a scientific fact.
My yeast did bubble a whole lot! My house was 74-75 degrees. The bread did raise after 2 hrs about 1/2 size bigger. I had the bread rising on top of my oven which was on and oven door cracked open for more heat. Then put it in. Then after it cooked and came out of oven it sunk to original size. Then after it cooled all the way it sunk to shorter than it started out. 1 1/4” high. I have a picture but i cant send it in this review. Ask me more questions so i can figure this out ok. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OQcFQOXVBm8
My quest has been bread with more than 5 gr fiber. Chia flour is what I have found. I substitute it for 1/3 of the flour in a recipe and it does the trick. It is lavender though and does tend to make my sandwich bread a little grey. But it is very pretty in blue berry muffins and pancakes. I grind my own rice flour, millet and corn flour and it makes a huge difference.
Maya, this is a beautiful looking bread. I’m going to try it, but before I do, I’d like to know if you have ever tried doubling the recipe. It seems that it would work–based on the fact that my almond flour bread that I have made for years uses 3 1/4 cups flour, and turns out pretty well. (I’m pretty content with my recipe, but admit that yours looks better due to the whiteness and it appears to have more air bubbles, indicating it’s probably lighter.) If I don’t hear from you, I’ll probably go ahead and double it, and use a 9×5 pan–wish me luck.
Many of you asked if you could make them with almond butter. So here we are, settling it once and for all. Why, yes, you can make them with almond butter. Woot woot!! Btw, please tell me that people still say “woot woot.” As usual, I’m like 1 full decade late to the slang game. Shall I remind you of my use of “cray?” I’ve totally got to start calling things “lit” too before that goes out.
Hi Sophie, I have found that the best almond flour for baking are the ones that have the skin removed (blanched) and are very finely ground. Some brands call it almond meal and some almond flour, so currently there’s no standard name. I have also found that not all brand work well. For example the Bobs Red Mill brand fails most of the time for baking. My personal favorite brands are by Honeyville and welbees. You may be able to order these from amazon.
In Defense of Food: An Eater's Manifesto by Michael Pollan gives a guided tour of 20th century food science, a history of "nutritionism" in America and a look at the marriage of government and the food industry. Then the book presents a commonsense shopping-and-eating guide, which like the paleo diet focuses on shopping the perimeter of the supermarket. He also now has a much shorter Food Rules: An Eater's Manual.
Elizabeth, This recipe is a bit heavy on the eggs because they add structure here; without them, it would be difficult to get the same height without doing quite a bit of experimentation to find a suitable substitute. If you’re looking for a paleo-friendly bread-type of recipe, my Paleo Flatbread may be more useful. It’s more of a wrap or can be made thinner into a crepe, rather than a loaf of bread, but it is delicious. That recipe uses one egg, but I’ve successfully made it using a flax “egg” instead of a regular egg. Sorry I’m not able to be more help, but I hope you like the flatbread if you give it a try! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aDs5M-i4GOA
Liza, I haven’t tried this recipe using cashew flour, but if you’ve had success using a 1:1 substitution for almond flour making other bread-type recipes, I think it could work! I also haven’t tried this recipe using coconut milk, but other readers have and said it works well. Yes, please let us know how it goes if you try it with these substitutions!
Cordain explains that high intake of fruits and vegetables is one of best ways to reduce chances of cancer and heart disease. He notes that protein has twice the calorie burning effect of fat and carbs and is more satiating than both. He explains that starch, fats, sugars, and salts together cause us to keep eating. So if we limit our diet to fruits and vegetables and/or meat, we’ll stop eating when we’re full. And if you stop eating when you’re full, you’ll lose weight and won’t get fat. And as you lose weight, your cholesterol will improve (regardless of what you eat). This all makes sense and can’t really be disputed. If you want to lose weight, the Paleo diet will get you there and probably quickly. But Cordain’s hypothesis applied to long-term health falls short. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5pWQEEzXRhM
I made this bread tonight and it did not rise well but the taste was great. My yeast did proof well so I know that was not the problem. I did accidentally omit the cream of tarter but will try again with that ingredient. After reading many of the comments I think I should have let the bread proof more. It did not rise much after 50 minutes but I needed to get it baked before bedtime so did not let it proof any longer. I also wonder if it was warm enough in the location I placed it. Next time I’ll be sure to let it proof longer and find a warmer place. I do have a question about separating the liquids. Wondering if beating the egg whites to stiff peaks with the cream of tarter then folding them in last if that would help with the rising. Just worry dough would be very stiff and incorporating the beaten egg whites would be hard.
I am allergic to chicken eggs so I have to use duck or no eggs. I will look for lighter flax though. I just thought there was no difference but colour. I did try it with two of the duck eggs only using the whites. It came out a bit lighter but still dense. My 4 year old even loved it and that is a hard thing to do lol! I toasted in a pan with grass fed butter and put maple syrup on, he asked for it the next day (this is a child that hates breakfast food)! So good! Thank you!

This was awesome. This is my second attempt at a no wheat bread. I did one before with coconut flour and it tasted like a salty cake. This is perfect. And I had to make few substitutions. Can’t wait to try the original recipe as I know it will taste even better. I had to substitute the flax meal and seeds with ground sesame and sesame seeds (no background on this, I made it up because I didn’t have flax seeds) and used olive oil instead of butter because I was too anxious to get it done and didn’t want to wait the melted butter to cool off. Even with this changes it browned perfectly, and it’s so fluffy!!! I’ll try toasting it to get a harder texture to be able to use it with toppings. Thank you very much for this recipe. 5 stars!!!

When I make this easy bread recipe, I weigh the zucchini and then use the food processor’s grater attachment to grate the zucchini right onto the batter, which is another time saving step! While this recipe is perfect for the end of summer when your garden is overflowing with zucchini, we also love to make this over the holidays to give to friends.
Sounds great. I just wondered if I chose to use just coconut flour and not almond, how much more coconut flour would I use than the original recipe calls for? I know that coconut flour soaks up much more liquid than almond floud so not sure if I would also need to add more liquid and if so what and how much? I’m new to paleo and not much of a cook but I’m trying to change that, esp with this new lifestyle change I’m trying to make. The Paleo bread I can get in stores is just too expensive, so I’m trying to do this on my own to save money. Also I need something like this to use with almond butter as a post-workout snack after hitting the gym. Options for portable protein are really limited, so that would work the best. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jm16Jr1Qtp8
Some Paleo dieters emphasize that they never believed in one true caveman lifestyle or diet and that—in the fashion of Sisson's Blueprint—they use our evolutionary past to form guidelines, not scripture. That strategy seems reasonably solid at first, but quickly disintegrates. Even though researchers know enough to make some generalizations about human diets in the Paleolithic with reasonable certainty, the details remain murky. Exactly what proportions of meat and vegetables did different hominid species eat in the Paleolithic? It's not clear. Just how far back were our ancestors eating grains and dairy? Perhaps far earlier than we initially thought. What we can say for certain is that in the Paleolithic, the human diet varied immensely by geography, season and opportunity. "We now know that humans have evolved not to subsist on a single, Paleolithic diet but to be flexible eaters, an insight that has important implications for the current debate over what people today should eat in order to be healthy," anthropologist William Leonard of Northwestern University wrote in Scientific American in 2002.
I added chia seeds to give the bread a bit of a healthy crunch, but also for the many nutritional benefits of these little wonders.  This a great low carb bread full of all my favourite low carb flours and so easy to make too.   You could add other flavours to this with herbs and spices and not be disappointed.  My next plan with this is to probably add some seeds to it.    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z0Iut8c-yJM
I’ve been following a gluten-free diet for two years now. I don’t adhere to a strictly Paleo diet but I use a lot of Paleo recipes I find on Pinterest. This is the first time I’ve ever left a comment or feedback. After enduring many labor-intensive, gluten-free and Paleo bread recipes, I have found my go-to! This is SO simple with a WONDERFUL taste and texture! I don’t keep flax on hand so I use sweet sorghum flour (I realize that’s not Paleo but it works for me.) I also add a packet of quick rise yeast simply because I like yeast flavor. I turn my oven on the lowest temp and set the batter on top of the stove for an hour and it does rise nicely. There’s no need to wait if you’re not looking for it to rise. The hands on time is just as the recipe indicates-minutes! I also just realized that the Paleo casserole dish I had intended to make for dinner tonight (and have already made several times) is from the same source and is DELICIOUS and healthy, comfort food! Thank you Kaylie for the simple, fantastic recipes!

I didn’t have almond flour so substituted 1 cup millet flour and 1 cup sorghum flour for the almond flour, and baked in an 7.5″ x 4.5″ x 2.5″ loaf pan. The loaf was short, about 1.5″ tall, the texture was pleasantly dense and held together well. The taste, however, was pasty (like flour) and the bread was dry. (I noticed afterwards that the sorghum flour package said to substitute 15-20% sorghum flour in your recipe, so that may have affected the taste and dryness.) I tried a slice with a topping of honey, and that was pretty good, but not good enough. So I made croutons, which were delicious. I cut the bread into small cubes and spread them on a cookie sheet, sprayed them with olive oil spray and drizzled 1/2 stick of butter over them, then seasoned generously with Nature’s Seasonings and garlic powder (for a richer crouton, could also sprinkle with parmesan cheese). I tossed them to distribute the seasonings and baked them at 350 degrees about 20 minutes until crunchy. I’ll try the recipe again when I have almond flour.
I ran out of coconut oil last week and my replacement doesn’t arrive until tomorrow. Desperate to try this I used canolia oil instead. I acknowledge that it’s properties are very different than coconut oil. That said, the bread is fantastic, a bit oily (but I bet that is the fault of my decision), and the taste is really eggy almost like french toast. I also lack a food processor so I mixed it all by hand after sifting the flours together.
I made the original version a while back and had the unfortunate “tunneling” effect that other people mentioned. The bread that did bake all the way through was delicious though so I tried again with the modified version. That took about 45 minutes total to bake but was cooked all the way through! And it’s just as delicious as the original! Had a couple slices tonight with some beef stew. Can’t wait to have some for breakfast tomorrow!
Hi Kim, thanks for your comment. Feel free to use a glass bread pan, the issue is that if you use a standard sized glass loaf pan when the magic line is called for the breads won’t fill the pan all the way and the breads will be very short. Since the magic line pan is smaller than a standard size loaf pan, you may also need to adapt the baking time :-)
As you might expect from the previous paragraph, eating plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables naturally leads to higher fiber intake. Dietary fiber is essential for good health, and despite what you’ve probably heard, whole grains aren’t the place to find it. Non-starchy vegetables contain eight times more fiber than whole grains and 31 times more fiber than refined grains. Even fruits contain twice as much fiber as whole grains and seven times more fiber than refined grains!
I have all the seeds but sesame seeds. I just have a small jar of those for using on top of things. Which of the other seeds could I use instead? Or, maybe chia seeds in a smaller amount? I also have a 3 seed mix with chia, flax and hemp. It really looks great! I haven’t had a lot of success with other keto, low carb breads. Want to give this a try. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qWK8Q6VG20o
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