Both kids and adults will enjoy stretching the honey into taffy, and the longer you stretch the honey, the easier and more pliable the taffy becomes. To avoid a sticky situation, make sure any surface you set the taffy on is thinly coated with cooking spray. You can also wear latex gloves (coated with canola oil) to make the pulling a little easier.
Hi Faith, I make a similar bread almost every day (from the Plant Paradox Cookbook), and it calls for full fat coconut milk…it works great as well. I will try your apple cider vinegar today, as the recipe I’ve been using calls for red wine vinegar. Thanks so much for posting, and thank you for the Arrowroot substitution…sometimes it can be a challenge to find! :-D https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ip69hOWsSls

I double the recipe, and started to put it into an 11 x 15 glass casserole, but I could see it was going to be spread too thin, so I hurriedly scraped the batter into a 9 x 12 pan. I baked it for 30 minutes, and it came out wonderfully. I cut it cake style into 12 squares, and by slicing them in half sideways, the squares are perfect as a bun or ciabatta. Holds together well, doesn’t crumble, nice thickness, and plenty of chewy crust.


I made this bread tonight and it did not rise well but the taste was great. My yeast did proof well so I know that was not the problem. I did accidentally omit the cream of tarter but will try again with that ingredient. After reading many of the comments I think I should have let the bread proof more. It did not rise much after 50 minutes but I needed to get it baked before bedtime so did not let it proof any longer. I also wonder if it was warm enough in the location I placed it. Next time I’ll be sure to let it proof longer and find a warmer place. I do have a question about separating the liquids. Wondering if beating the egg whites to stiff peaks with the cream of tarter then folding them in last if that would help with the rising. Just worry dough would be very stiff and incorporating the beaten egg whites would be hard.
Hi, Kaylie. It’s yummy! I just made the bread and ate 4(!) slices before slicing and freezing the rest. I followed the recipe exactly, using the same ingredients, measurements, temp. and baking time. I was surprised by the size of the finished loaf. It measured 3 7/8″ wide by 2″ high. I can’t imagine making a sandwich with slices that size! That said, it tastes great, and has a very good texture. At 35 minutes, I used a toothpick to see if it was baked through. The toothpick came out clean, but on slicing it, I think I’ll give it a few more minutes when I make it again. Thanks for the recipe.

Thank you so much for this recipe! I’ve made it several times and I love it for myself. I have tried many versions: coconut oil, ghee, butter, coconut cream, refrigerated coconut milk from a can, shaken (after a couple of days in the fridge) and full fat yogurt. I always beat my eggs for 2-3 minutes (by hand) until very frothy before adding the wet ingredients then beat them again after incorporating wet ingredients to get them thick. Although I like them all, I have had the best results for rising (and actual ‘bread-like’ texture and loft) from coconut oil and yogurt. My husband eats gluten-free but not paleo so when his favourite GF bread was out at the store he was stuck (he’s a ‘must eat sandwich for lunch’ guy and we’ve tried all the GF varieties in our store, some of them complete rocks!). I offered to make him a loaf and he accepted (he’s had this loaf before but felt it’s texture was more like a banana bread or zucchini bread than sandwich material). I got rave reviews from him today about the bread for his sandwich (made with coconut oil and yogurt). Total convert!! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OmNYKN96rqE
Tonight, I tried using this differently…I coated all natural hot dogs with it and made “corn dogs”. I was able to cover 7 easily with a full recipe, minus 1 egg so it would be stiffer dough, and laid them on a Silpat covered cookie sheet. I started at 400 degrees to make sure they browned, but I ended up turning it down to 350 for about 25 minutes. They were great. Thanks again for the recipe and hard work.

Made this bread the other night and it is so wonderful!!.Love it slightly warmed with a pat of butter.My only problem is that it did not rise that much so can’t really use for a sandwich.My eggs were not fresh nor my refrigerated flaxseed meal..I used a glass loaf pan (buttered).I did cook at 350 degrees for the 30 min and it came out wonderful!!Thanks so much for the recipe.I love the recipes with honey and/or stevia, sucanat or rapadura. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Fe4jOwAVbY

I made this bread twice. The first time I followed your recipe exactly, but it came out dry and sort of tasteless. I think it’s because of my elevation and how dry the climate is here, so I added about a 1/4 c maple syrup the second time I made it and it’s perfect! I really like this recipe, and I hope others at high and dry climates don’t give up on it if they have the same problem.
[…] I don't like the word "diet", so I'll say that this is more a way of changing what you eat long-term. It's all based around what our ancestor hunter-gatherers would have eaten, and what we've evolved to be able to process and absorb. The very basic level of it, is that you don't eat carbohydrates, processed meats or sugars, and cut out dairy products. You instead eat plenty of fresh meat, fish, vegetables, fruits and nuts. You can still have oil, provided it's natural – so coconut, peanut & olive oil are all good. The good thing is that you're also allowed to take this to your own level – so if you want a couple of days off a week – say, weekends, you can do it & it will still be a lot healthier for you. This is a really helpful site I've used to make a note on my shopping list of what's allowed: The Ultimate Paleo Diet Food List | Ultimate Paleo Guide […] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XfDrmTzbLSM
Often Keto and Paleo recipes get grouped together which is how I found you…I am on Keto though, and the tapioca flour and applesauce bring the carb amounts up too high. Do you have a low carb alternative for these ingredients? Is there a way to sub coconut flour for the tapioca by adjusting the ratios of the coconut flour to liquid. I may be able to get by using the applesauce (I think that will be ok if no more than 1/4 c,) but would still need a compensating liquid. Any suggestions? I so want this to be my answer to a long search for a decent bread substitute.

Nothing like wasting expensive ingredients. I bought the pan, the exact size and brand. My ingredients were exact and fresh and I baked it at 350 for 30 min and it came out completely uncooked in the center and crusty and risen on top. Back in the oven for 15 more minutes – still raw batter through the entire center of the loaf. I now have it back in the oven to finish cooking the center which will no doubt burn the outside. But I’m not wasting all those ingredients and throwing in the trash. Including the pan, I have a huge investment and expected it to turn out so nicely. Is 350 correct? for only 30 minutes? correct? what could possibly cause this. The pan was dead center in the oven as well and my oven works.


I tried this recipe today and I’m blown away. I haven’t started Keto yet but I am soon. I’ve been trying recipes out, and I truly didn’t expect this to come out right the first time because I’ve never whipped egg whites or folded them into anything. I’m a terrible baker. It was so easy! Even my toddler and husband loves this! I didn’t use the sweetener and love the way it tastes!

Both kids and adults will enjoy stretching the honey into taffy, and the longer you stretch the honey, the easier and more pliable the taffy becomes. To avoid a sticky situation, make sure any surface you set the taffy on is thinly coated with cooking spray. You can also wear latex gloves (coated with canola oil) to make the pulling a little easier.
Alright. So I saw this recipe yesterday, and knew I had to make it- even on a weeknight. Blender bread = so so easy (thank you!) Long story short, we’ve already eaten the whole loaf. My husband made awesome BLT’s for dinner, my toddler helped himself to a couple after dinner pieces. 😀 THEN. This morning my husband used the remaining slices to make open face breakfast sammies… runny egg and all. I did bake the loaf for quite a bit longer than you posted… but I’m pretty sure that is a reflection of our sad oven more than anything else. The bread has an awesome rustic texture… I’m going to try bruschetta with it next!! We did give each slice a quick fry in bacon grease to “toast” right before serving. Sidenote, I’m 6mo pregnant… so 2 full BLT’s is totally the norm for me right now 😀 Anyway, THANK YOU! This is my first time landing at your site… and I can’t wait to explore more of your recipes!!

Hi Elana! I just found your website and I’m so glad that I did! I’ve been on a GF diet for about a month after having years of terrible GI problems. I can’t remember when I didn’t have GI issues, and have done a number of elimination diets to figure out the problem. I’ve visited a few gastroenterologists and they haven’t identified anything “wrong” with me. I still haven’t pinpointed it, but overall I feel happier knowing that I’ve omitted something that was such a big part of my life before. Your bread recipe was very much needed since I still have an affinity for bread-like (carb-y) foods. The bread is delicious and SO hearty. I was skeptical at first, but it turns out I’m hooked on the stuff! Unfortunately I didn’t have coconut flour, so I ended up using 2 T of GF flour, it still worked! I have a shipment coming soon and can’t wait to try it out with the CF! Thanks again, I look forward to reading more of your posts even though I’m not a paleo nut! ;)


Trick And Treat - how 'healthy eating' is making us ill by Barry Groves. The author is one of the world's most outspoken proponents of a high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet. This book is an account of how and why the health-care establishment has got the concept of 'healthy eating' so wrong. Whereas Taubes work (see above) is a fairly straight forward review of the existing science, Groves expands into the politics of medical research and treatment to a much greater extent. "Trick and Treat" is divided into two parts. Part One describes the corruption in the health industry, points out the problems inherent in a high-carb, low-fat diet, and then prescribes a diet that leads to good health. The prescribed diet is high in fat - specifically animal fat, not polyunsaturated vegetable fat - and low in carbohydrates, with 60-70% of calories from fat, 15-25% of calories from protein, and a mere 10-15% of calories from carbohydrates. Part Two describes numerous diseases the author claims are the result of high carbohydrate consumption. These range from life-threatening disorders such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancer to less serious problems such as acne, near-sightedness and dental problems. The Amazon reviews average to 4+ stars.
Thanks for taking the time to post the Metric measures Pat. I’ve just made my first loaf, which is ok but I misread the ingredients and only put 1/2 tsp of baking powder in the mix ..duh! There’s another one baking right now with the correct amount in . Really looking forward to it. I’m going to slice it up and freeze it in portions so I can take out what I need and toast it. The only downside for me is the almond flour and coconut flour is very expensive in the uk. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XSGRd5Ve1zI
Hi Claudia, unfortunately, more almond butter won’t thicken the bars the way that coconut flour will. You *might* be able to use almond flour, but proceed with caution since almond flour is MUCH less absorbent than coconut flour. Start with 3/4 cup almond flour and experiment until you get the consistency you like (basically, they should be thick and dense enough to cut through.) So sorry to hear about your possible allergy to coconut. 🙁 Big hugs. xo

One larger randomized controlled trial followed 70 post-menopausal Swedish women with obesity for two years, who were placed on either a Paleo diet or a Nordic Nutrition Recommendations (NNR) diet. [7] The Paleo diet provided 30% of total calories from protein, 40% fat (from mostly monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats) and 30% carbohydrates. It included lean meats, fish, eggs, vegetables, fruits, berries, nuts, avocado, and olive oil. The NNR diet provided less protein and fat but more carbohydrate with 15% protein, 25-30% fat, and 55-60% carbohydrates, including foods similar to the Paleo diet but also low-fat dairy products and high-fiber grains. Both groups significantly decreased fat mass and weight circumference at 6 and 24 months, with the Paleo diet producing greater fat loss at 6 months but not at 24 months. Triglyceride levels decreased more significantly with the Paleo diet at 6 and 24 months than the NNR diet.

Made this tonight, and it came out delicious!! I subbed in grapeseed oil for the coconut oil, and used ground chia seed instead of the flax, because they are what I had on hand, and it is wonderful. Nice “whole grain” texture and nutty taste, so yummy just spread with good butter. Will definitely be making this again! I’m mostly Paleo, and LOVE your almond flour and coconut flour recipes, delicious and grain free. Thank you so much. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u_avCXT2rMw


Sometimes you don’t need a loaf of bread, and you just need enough for yourself to make a sandwich or to serve as a side to a hearty Paleo chili. This single serve recipe can easily be multiplied if needed, but it’s best when used as a one-serving bread when you don’t have the time, desire, or need for more than just enough for yourself. The way they’ve figure out how to make this Paleo friendly and ready to go in just a few minutes is impressive. It makes the perfect companion to all sorts of soups and stews, as the bookends to a sandwich, or as an accompaniment to eggs and bacon. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q3ywOo3iNoY
I’m new to the whole GF thing – I don’t have a physical need/condition for eating grain free, but the whole concept of this healthy way of eating intrigues me, so I’m just “testing the waters.” It is very generous that Elana shares her recipes for free so that I can give it a try before jumping in with both feet – and when/if I do, I’ll be buying her recipe books. Great blog.
Ostensibly, Grok is "a rather typical hunter–gatherer" living before the dawn of agriculture—an "official primal prototype." He is the poster-persona for fitness author and blogger Mark Sisson's "Primal Blueprint"—a set of guidelines that "allows you to control how your genes express themselves in order to build the strongest, leanest, healthiest body possible, taking clues from evolutionary biology (that's the primal part)." These guidelines incorporate many principles of what is more commonly known as the Paleolithic, or caveman, diet, which started to whet people's appetites as early as the 1960s and is available in many different flavors today.

I am trying this recipe for the very first time. It’s in the oven as I type! I am only 30 hours into a Paleo diet shift, and I am so happy to find a paleo bread recipe. I like eating extra virgin olive oil with bread to get more healthy fat into my diet, and this recipe will allow me to do just that. I am pursuing a paleo – possibly keto – diet for health reasons that also include a diagnosis of MS.


So, just as I was about to put these in the oven, my 20 year old oven caught fire. After having the fire department visit, I used coconut oil spray on a glass square dish and cooked it in the microwave. Total time was about 8 minutes because I kept stopping and starting it. The recipe was delicious! Thank you to our fire department and to you for this wonderful bread alternative!
Hey Maya!! This is the 2nd recipe I’ve tried off your website and again I love it!! Turned out really well. I can have sandwiches again or a quick piece Of toast when I’m in a hurry to get out the door. I was skeptical about the xanthan gum since I tried a recipe using psyllium husk powder. I did not like it. I can’t taste the xanthan gum so I have no problem using it going forward. Thanks again for the recipe!!! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oi-920uV3UY

The theory is our bodies were designed, and still optimized, to eat what our Paleolithic ancestors ate. Like your hunger-gatherer forefathers, on Paleo you get all the meat from wild animals and unlimited fruits and vegetables you can eat. But no starchy vegetables (like potatoes), no legumes (like lentils or beans), no wheat, and no grains (like quinoa or corn) because those plants were invented by human beings during the agricultural revolution after our Paleolithic ancestors left the planet. You get one cheat day where you can eat whatever you want (“Occasional cheating and digressions may be just what you need to help you stick to the diet.”) No oil because it puts omega 6 and omega 3 ratios out of whack which should never exceed 2:1, except olive oil if you must. Dairy is also prohibited. And meat must come from animals that weren’t fed grains (like corn) because grains lead to inflammation and increased fat.

Hi Jennifer, I understand all the science behind gluten baking, but honestly when it comes to keto baking (no starches, gluten, etc) the rules change completely. The bread also needs a SUBSTANTIAL amount more heat to rise than with a regular gluten bread (so while you would leave a gluten loaf on the counter and it would rise beautifully, with this one you actually need to introduce a bit more heat to get a proper rise). The bread will also only rise so much without collapsing, so the acidity doesn’t affect the rise believe it or not. But of course, you’re free to test around yourself as you clearly have the knowledge- just keep in mind that behavior varies a lot xo!
I’m Amy, foodie, nutritionist, recipe developer, wife, and busy mom of 2. I am on a mission to create everyday nutritious recipes that taste absolutely DELICIOUS!!! I love comfort food with a healthy twist. Follow me as I share the simple meals I make for my family. I’ll make meal planning easy by telling you exactly what we eat every week! Read More
Made this today, had a couple slices for a sandwich for lunch! My add-in spices was a Mediterranean spice blend that added a nice depth. I froze the rest for future sandwich cravings… thanks for an easy recipe with everything I have on hand! Oh, and I used 3/4 cup of dehydrated almond pulp from making milk, and 1/2 cup bob’s red mill gf flour instead of all almond flour!
My son can’t have eggs, so I did MAJOR substitutions, and it still turned out yummy. We usually use flax for eggs, but since this recipe already calls for flax, I used 5 different eggs substitutes: 1/4 coconut yogurt, 1/3 cup applesauce, 1/4 cup vegetable oil (I used olive), 2 heaping tbsp potato starch, 2 heaping tbsp arrowroot powder. Perhaps because we couldn’t use the eggs, there wasn’t a hard crust, but again, it was still yummy. We have to make do in a no egg diet ;). I also didn’t have the correct size loaf pan, so I used two mini loaf pans and baked them for about 25 minutes. Hope someone sees this who has to eat an egg-free diet :).
I’ve perused your bread recipe offerings (which I hadn’t really looked at previously since we mostly just opt-out of bread-type products) and am wondering which you would most recommend as a kid-pleaser to try in the challah mold. Additionally, I am wondering if you’ve ever played around with a potato-based bread option? I would prefer something that is not entirely flour based (including nut flours), if it is possible . . . https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aH5IqMjQm7U
I make my own ACV from apple scraps. It’s so easy….after peeling and coring apples for another recipe, you take the scraps, let them air dry for a bit, then put them in a jar with water, cover with coffee filter and rubberband, put in cabinet and let it sit. 3 days is minimum, and better is 5-6 weeks or longer. I have let it sit for months and have come out with a great product. My first batch, I did add a couple tablespoons of Braggs as a starter. This will create a “mother” you can use over and over again. It’s a continuous process…and you never run out of ACV!
When you are separating the eggs if you use the method of pouring the egg from one half of the shell to the other you have to be extremely careful because the sharp shell can easily break the yolk. There are tools that you can purchase that will cradle the yolk and let the white run into a separate bowl. Or, you can use your hands. You need to make sure that your hands are extremely clean and fresh from being washed. Break the egg into one hand and let the white slip between your slightly separate fingers. The yolk will settle into your hand and the white will slip off into the bowl.
In order to simulate a bread-like texture without using gluten, grain free and gluten free bread recipes often use a variety of different flours and binders. We’ve tried so many keto bread recipes that taste way too eggy or too much like almonds or coconut. The trick is to find a combination of ingredients that yields good flavor, as well as bready texture and a loaf that rises nicely. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lM5zHcTPab0
I ran out of coconut oil last week and my replacement doesn’t arrive until tomorrow. Desperate to try this I used canolia oil instead. I acknowledge that it’s properties are very different than coconut oil. That said, the bread is fantastic, a bit oily (but I bet that is the fault of my decision), and the taste is really eggy almost like french toast. I also lack a food processor so I mixed it all by hand after sifting the flours together.
My son can’t have eggs, so I did MAJOR substitutions, and it still turned out yummy. We usually use flax for eggs, but since this recipe already calls for flax, I used 5 different eggs substitutes: 1/4 coconut yogurt, 1/3 cup applesauce, 1/4 cup vegetable oil (I used olive), 2 heaping tbsp potato starch, 2 heaping tbsp arrowroot powder. Perhaps because we couldn’t use the eggs, there wasn’t a hard crust, but again, it was still yummy. We have to make do in a no egg diet ;). I also didn’t have the correct size loaf pan, so I used two mini loaf pans and baked them for about 25 minutes. Hope someone sees this who has to eat an egg-free diet :). https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vyxPH6jPnlw
I am currently looking for a recipe to try in my recently acquired, but not-yet-used silicone challah mold (https://www.amazon.com/Amazing-Perfect-Silicone-Bakeware-Braiding/dp/B005NAGY8O). Our family eats gluten-free, with a strong leaning towards a whole foods/Paleo diet. My husband and I are happy to enjoy a Shabbat dinner sans challah, though our 8- and 5-year-old daughters are very disappointed (especially when we are at synagogue and we ask them not to have any of the challah) to be missing out.
I just made this bread and it came out great although I did adjust a few ingredients. I made this bread with four eggs(1 less than called for). Also I whipped the egg whites separately until they formed peaks(in order to make the bread less dense). Lastly, I added two tablespoons of applesauce to make up for the missing egg. This bread did take 45 minutes to bake, but I lowered the temperature to 245 because the outside was cooking faster than the inside. In the end this bread came out delicious and I enjoyed it with jam and honey, happy baking.

But human populations in different regions of the world ate a variety of diets. Some ate more; some ate less. They likely ate meat only when they could get it, and then they gorged. Richard Wrangham, author of Catching Fire: How Cooking Made Us Human, says diets from around the world ranged greatly in the percentage of calories from meat. It’s not cooked meat that made us human, he says, but rather cooked food. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S2wGrYngpJ0
thank you for prompt reply. I do hope it tastes better than other low carb bread I’ve made and thrown out because I dislike the taste and sometimes it was too wet. It looks great so will try and report back. I must find something I like as at the moment am tucking into “normal” bread and that’s not good for my wastline or my diabetes. Thanks for the inspiring recipes. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=srmxhx3sVhI
The Vibram Fivefingers KSO Trek is a more rugged version of the popular KSO. Made from K-100 high performance kangaroo leather, the KSO Trek boasts extreme strength for excellent durability; amazing breathability; perspiration resistance to prevent sweat damage and prolong shoe life; and features MicrobloK anti-microbial treatment. These Vibram shoes are made for rugged outdoor use, providing grip and traction over a variety of surfaces. Additionally, the individual toe pockets separate and strengthen toes to improve balance, agility, and range of motion; while the thin EVA midsole and Vibram Performance rubber outsole allows your feet to move the way nature intended. The Vibram FiveFingers KSO Trek Shoes are perfect for light trekking, trail running, fitness walking, and travel. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Isfh0AtkZd0
Sweden's Staffan Lindeberg has a home page Paleolithic Diet in Medical Nutrition [archive.org]. A recent study of Staffan's has A Paleolithic diet improving glucose tolerance more than a Mediterranean-like diet in individuals with ischemic heart disease. Also see his first web page, an overview of his Kitava study: On the Benefits of Ancient Diets. Now he has a book Food and Western Disease: Health and nutrition from an evolutionary perspective. Here's a book review: Easy to Read, Informative, Packed with Footnotes on Studies.
Interestingly, all of these seemingly unrelated diseases share a common cause: damage to the intestinal lining which allows large, undigested food particles to make their way into the body. This is called “leaky gut and the autoimmune response”. Here is a 7-part video series by Prof. Loren Cordain describing the etiology of Multiple Sclerosis. And please watch this TED talk by Dr. Terry Wahls, MD as she describes how she reversed her Multiple Sclerosis with a paleo diet. If you have an autoimmune disease you might consider trying the autoimmune protocol of the paleo diet. If you do, please tell us about your experience.
We made the mix as directed. We then mixed 1/2 cup coconut sugar and 1 Tablespoon cinnamon in a separate container. Pour 1/2 of the bread mix in the pan, followed by 1/2 of the cinnamon/sugar mix. Then put the rest of the bread mix in the pan and cover with the rest of the cinnamon/sugar mix. Then swirl with a knife. Great bread for having with stew or soup! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mybgoG_DHZk
wow, I have tried to make a good gluten free bread for about a year and this tops all of the recipes I’ve tried. I have to agree with the comment that most gluten-free/grain-free breads are eggy … this one is not and it tastes great. I just enjoyed a piece with boursin tomato pesto. Thank you for the great recipe. I will be trying many more of your recipes. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ni9XJ90f-Bc
We’re loving the taste and texture of this–but like a few others, I came out with a dense. flat loaf (only about 1 1/2″ high). The liquid mixture seemed very thick, and the combined batter was almost a dough going into the pan, not exactly pourable. I know some almond flours behave differently; I used Bob’s Red Mill (only thing readily available here), if that makes a difference.

Tried making these with sunflower seed butter in a bun pan! They do come out a bit green, but I like them better than the almond butter variety. I’m using sugar free/salt free sunflower seed butter (not SunButter) and it seems to be the most filling stuff on the planet. I can’t eat more than a teaspoon of it (unlike almond butter, which I must be very careful around!), and it makes these little bread rounds very filling, too! I pour 1/4 cup of batter into each well of a standard bun pan and I get 10 or 12 little bread rounds. They’re not as tall as muffin tops, and much shorter than a yeast roll. I pop them in the toaster and spread them with butter and homemade Paleo jam. Great for breakfast!
I’ve been following a gluten-free diet for two years now. I don’t adhere to a strictly Paleo diet but I use a lot of Paleo recipes I find on Pinterest. This is the first time I’ve ever left a comment or feedback. After enduring many labor-intensive, gluten-free and Paleo bread recipes, I have found my go-to! This is SO simple with a WONDERFUL taste and texture! I don’t keep flax on hand so I use sweet sorghum flour (I realize that’s not Paleo but it works for me.) I also add a packet of quick rise yeast simply because I like yeast flavor. I turn my oven on the lowest temp and set the batter on top of the stove for an hour and it does rise nicely. There’s no need to wait if you’re not looking for it to rise. The hands on time is just as the recipe indicates-minutes! I also just realized that the Paleo casserole dish I had intended to make for dinner tonight (and have already made several times) is from the same source and is DELICIOUS and healthy, comfort food! Thank you Kaylie for the simple, fantastic recipes!
The aspects of the Paleo diet that advise eating fewer processed foods and less sugar and salt are consistent with mainstream advice about diet.[1] Diets with a paleo nutrition pattern have some similarities to traditional ethnic diets such as the Mediterranean diet that have been found to be healthier than the Western diet.[3][6] Following the Paleo diet, however, can lead to nutritional deficiencies such as those of vitamin D and calcium, which in turn could lead to compromised bone health;[1][20] it can also lead to an increased risk of ingesting toxins from high fish consumption.[3]
Both kids and adults will enjoy stretching the honey into taffy, and the longer you stretch the honey, the easier and more pliable the taffy becomes. To avoid a sticky situation, make sure any surface you set the taffy on is thinly coated with cooking spray. You can also wear latex gloves (coated with canola oil) to make the pulling a little easier. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7E5nfF-bmV4
I’ve been working on this Paleo Bread recipe for several months and have tested it a couple of dozen times. In fact, every time I create a recipe I test each and every ingredient addition or subtraction. That’s why I think it’s kinda funny when people leave comments below recipes (or on Instagram) asking how such and such ingredient substitution will turn out.

And also I wanted to share that as far as converting measurements to grams…if you look on the bag it will tell you the conversion. For example, my almond flour is 1/4 cup = 28g. This is much more accurate than using a generic conversion chart. Had I used the one listed above in the comments I would have nearly doubled the amount of almond flour. This bread is sadly expensive for me to make…worth it, but expensive. I will be able to get two loaves from one $10 bag of almond flour. Counting eggs and all other ingredients, that’s pricey for 12 slices of bread. However, you get what you pay for, you know? Nutritious food isn’t always cheap, but for your body it should be necessary. I’m learning this as I go. Again, I appreciate this recipe so much! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_3L3Q1GuDkE
Best bread I’ve found so far! I just used almond meal instead of blanched almond flour as I haven’t gotten around to buying any yet but it is so yummy! Had some left over chicken from a roast last night and it was definitely one of the best chicken sandwiches I’ve had for a long time! Same as Kai though I think I’ll drop back the coconut oil next time by maybe a tbs or 2 🙂
Thank you so much for this recipe!! I am Norwegian and eating bread for multiple meals is part of our culture. I have not had too many problems with switching to a paleo diet but I have sorely missed eating bread. I have tried many gluten free and paleo bread recipes out there but this is by far the best one. I used 4 wide mouth canning jar lids and otherwise followed your recipe exactly and they came out nice and fluffy and even held up with “wet” sandwich ingredients . I am going to try some of the variations in the comments. Thank you for bringing back a vital part of my culture!
Nothing like wasting expensive ingredients. I bought the pan, the exact size and brand. My ingredients were exact and fresh and I baked it at 350 for 30 min and it came out completely uncooked in the center and crusty and risen on top. Back in the oven for 15 more minutes – still raw batter through the entire center of the loaf. I now have it back in the oven to finish cooking the center which will no doubt burn the outside. But I’m not wasting all those ingredients and throwing in the trash. Including the pan, I have a huge investment and expected it to turn out so nicely. Is 350 correct? for only 30 minutes? correct? what could possibly cause this. The pan was dead center in the oven as well and my oven works.
Grains and legumes (or pulses) are other groups that are frowned upon in the diet. "The right grains in the right amount can actually curtail inflammation," says Bonnie Taub-Dix, MA, RD, CDN, creator of the blog Better Than Dieting and author of Read It Before You Eat It: Taking You From Label To Table. In addition, fiber-rich legumes, including beans, lentils, and peas, have been consistently linked with reduced risk of obesity and chronic disease. "Fiber-rich carbs can supply energy, fiber, a host of vitamins and minerals, and a soothing satisfaction that could keep us from eating less nutritionally dense choices," Taub-Dix says. With the rise in popularity of ancient grains such as amaranth, millet, oats, and teff, and pulses, such as chickpeas and lentils, there's much opportunity to access versatile, naturally delicious whole grains and legumes that our ancestors ate. "Carbohydrates have a bad reputation, justified by the company they often keep, such as rich sauces and butter, and the forms in which they may be served (eg, donuts and pastries)," Taub-Dix says, "but the right carbs can save us from degenerative diseases."
Here is your chance to make pumpkin bagels that can help usher in fall, and also are great any time of the year. They are made with real pumpkin of course, as well as a host of additional ingredients to make them taste great without being bad for you in any way. Just be sure to follow the Paleo instructions, as this is a multi-purpose recipe but they’ve included the necessary substitutes to keep it Paleo. These taste great with grass-fed butter on them, and you can even try using a Paleo-friendly cream cheese if you feel up to it.
Both kids and adults will enjoy stretching the honey into taffy, and the longer you stretch the honey, the easier and more pliable the taffy becomes. To avoid a sticky situation, make sure any surface you set the taffy on is thinly coated with cooking spray. You can also wear latex gloves (coated with canola oil) to make the pulling a little easier. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7E5nfF-bmV4
It took a month or so, but I finally decided to start playing around with adding a few other paleo-friendly starches, like arrowroot and tapioca. That’s what it took for me to come up with what I consider to be the perfect loaf. I had been holding out on adding other starches because I wanted to keep my ingredient list minimal, but really, these additions make all the difference in the end result of this bread.
I didn’t measure my pan but when I baked this bread it was a bit flat also, so I cut the loaf in half, and then sliced each half into bread sized pieces. It worked perfectly for full sized pieces that looked like ‘normal’ bread. I cannot get over how easy and delicious this bread is. My sweet son can have no grains, and no honey….so I left out the honey and added 1 tsp of xylitol. So so good. And this morning when I toasted a piece for him, he thought I made a mistake and gave him ‘real’ bread!
Our hefty cousins, the apes, spend half their waking hours gnawing on raw sustenance, about six hours per day. In contrast, we spend only one hour. “So in a sense, cooking opens up this space for other activities,” says Pollan. “It’s very hard to have culture, it’s very hard to have science, it’s very hard to have all the things we count as important parts of civilization if you’re spending half of all your waking hours chewing.” Cooked food: It gave us civilization.

As of 2016 there are limited data on the metabolic effects on humans eating a Paleo diet, but the data are based on clinical trials that have been too small to have a statistical significance sufficient to allow the drawing of generalizations.[3][6][20][not in citation given] These preliminary trials have found that participants eating a paleo nutrition pattern had better measures of cardiovascular and metabolic health than people eating a standard diet,[3][9] though the evidence is not strong enough to recommend the Paleo diet for treatment of metabolic syndrome.[9] As of 2014 there was no evidence the paleo diet is effective in treating inflammatory bowel disease.[21]
I tried this recipe and it is not at all easy to incorporate 1/2 the egg whites in the food processor. When attempting to pulse just 2-3 times, only part of the egg whites incorporated, leaving 1/2 the whipped egg whites still sitting at the top of the mixture. I then had to use a spatula to force it down and pulsed 3 more times and ended up with a heavy batter because the egg whites completely fell. Then trying to fold the mixture into the rest of the egg whites was like trying to fold in cookie dough. The result was a loaf of baked eggs whites that had clumps of batter in the middle.
I love love love love!!! This recipe. My only questions are how should I store the bread? And how long should it last without spoiling? I made a loaf on Sunday evening and kept it in an airtight container on my counter. By Friday morning (or maybe even before because I hadn’t eaten it for a day or so) it was ripe. Smelled like something was fermenting. Any tips? Maybe I should have stored it in the fridge.
I am a complete fan of yours and have been trying various recipes over the years that have loved by my family! I tried making this bread today. It was cooked all the way through but looked rather pale. I wanted to put it back in the oven a little longer but feared that this plan would make things way to dry. Any thoughts with what I can do differently next time?
An Interview with Ward Nicholson now has three parts on the web. Good overview of man's diet over the past 65 million years. Long but highly recommended reading. First published in Chet Day's "Health & Beyond" newsletter. Now part of a very comprehensive Beyond Vegetarianism site. Every argument that your vegetarian friends use to avoid meat for health reasons is debunked here.
Dessert is the hardest bad habit to break when you commit to a new and improved healthy eating resolution. The good news is that there are SO many natural alternatives, you can easily hack a way to #TreatYoSelf to your favorite sweets. We’ve seen healthy bean desserts become all the rage, and most of them are refined sugar-free and Paleo-friendly. Since chocolate is everyone’s go-to treat of choice, healthy chocolate recipes are also quite coveted in the diet world. Lucky for you, we dug up 18 Paleo chocolate desserts that are so indulgent, you won’t believe they’re secretly good for you.
By far my favorite bread recipe! It turned out golden brown with a great flavor! Super easy and basic ingredients so you don’t have to run to the supermarket before making it. I asked my husband (not paleo or gluten free) to taste it and he thought it was good. That’s quite a compliment because he dislikes most gluten free/paleo things. Just a note, I’m at 9300 feet above sea level and it still raised and turned out delicious!
re almond flour & coconut oil, any health food store staff would be super helpful in pointing you to the right ones, especially when you tell them you’ll baking. he showed me unbleached almond flour and coconut flour (Bob’s Red Mill is all over NYC, at least, and you can get it online http://www.amazon.com/Bobs-Red-Mill-Organic-16-Ounce/dp/B000KENKZ8/ref=sr_1_4?s=grocery&ie=UTF8&qid=1383057846&sr=1-4&keywords=bob%27s+red+mill+coconut their products are consistently great, IMHO)

Obesity, heart disease, and diabetes: These are just a few of the health conditions that proponents of the Paleolithic diet, or caveman diet, blame on our sedentary lifestyles and modern diets, which are loaded with sugar, fat, and processed foods. Their proposed solution? Cut modern foods from our diet and return to the way our early hunter-gatherer ancestors ate.
We cannot time travel and join our Paleo ancestors by the campfire as they prepare to eat; likewise, shards of ancient pottery and fossilized teeth can tell us only so much. If we compare the diets of so-called modern hunter-gatherers, however, we see just how difficult it is to find meaningful commonalities and extract useful dietary guidelines from their disparate lives (see infographic). Which hunter–gatherer tribe are we supposed to mimic, exactly? How do we reconcile the Inuit diet—mostly the flesh of sea mammals—with the more varied plant and land animal diet of the Hadza or !Kung? Chucking the many different hunter–gather diets into a blender to come up with some kind of quintessential smoothie is a little ridiculous. "Too often modern health problems are portrayed as the result of eating 'bad' foods that are departures from the natural human diet…This is a fundamentally flawed approach to assessing human nutritional needs," Leonard wrote. "Our species was not designed to subsist on a single, optimal diet. What is remarkable about human beings is the extraordinary variety of what we eat. We have been able to thrive in almost every ecosystem on the Earth, consuming diets ranging from almost all animal foods among populations of the Arctic to primarily tubers and cereal grains among populations in the high Andes.” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ogf0TuIpffg
It’s easy to find more guidance online, but a book also makes a handy reference. "The Paleo Diet," for example, outlines basic Paleo principles and offers three “levels” that allow for different degrees of cheating – three “open meals” per week on the “entry level” plan, two on “maintenance” and just one on “maximal.” Depending on the level, you might also get “transitional” condiments (low-fat dressing and salsa) and drinks (coffee, beer or wine in moderation) to wash down the meat and plants. You can use the levels as you like. Start with the first and move gradually to the more restrictive – or just stay put. For more dramatic changes, head right to the third. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6It1CI9yO18

I have recently discovered your website and I’m so pleased that I did. There is so much content there. It’s the bread I’m particularly interested in at this point since I have not had any bread for about two and a half years so I went straight there. I tried your world famous paleo bread and I must say it was very nice. However it does not look like your bread in that mine was much darker and much denser. I tried to find a comment where you addressed this issue but I only got as far as some comments regarding the height of the bread. You stated that the tin size was most likely incorrect. I’m sure my tin as a bit on the big side but when I look at the pic of your bread I can see yours is a much lighter bread than mine and also much lighter in colour.
Actually, I m not talking about Wheat flour. I suggested Vital Wheat Gluten and Wheat Protein Isolate. Which are low in carbs. Vital Wheat Gluten is 4g carbs per 1/4 cup and Wheat Protein Isolate is 2 to 3g per 1/4 cup. There is actually Low Carb bread being sold out there with these ingredients now. And, Oat Fiber actually has zero carbs. So, it is Keto. Especially, that you really don’t need to use much during baking. Most used would be Almond or Coconut Flour. I am doing Keto to loose weight and get back in shape. I have no Gluten allergies. So, for those that do, this isn’t a good choice, but it is for me. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CN6GiTISGQU
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