Hi Adriana, thank you for this recipe. My youngest son has to eat gluten free and I’m trying to find a recipe for bread that he really likes (none so far). It’s just in the oven and I hope it turns out okay, because the batter wasn’t a batter, it was more of a dough… I followed your recipe to the letter: same ingredients, no overmixing… Do you have any idea what could have happened?
Hi Elana! Love this bread…have been making it for a couple of months now. Only one problem: I keep getting these cobwebs in the bread. It appears after a few days being kept sealed on the counter. Have you ever come across this problem? I assume if it was a problem of the bread going bad it would get mouldy…but this isn’t mould, it looks like cobwebs inside the bread. I read up on it and people say that the cobwebs are from moth eggs. Once I read that, I got rid of my original flours and purchased new items at a different store from a different brand. I made the bread right away and stored the flours in the fridge. Once again though, each bread I make..after 3-4 days, it got cobweby.
Before going Paleo, I LOVED making bread. And while I miss it much less than I thought I would, I’m still hunting for good savory bread recipes. This one is the best so far! My husband swore there must be some type of wheat flour in it. Unfortunately, my almond butter had evaporated cane juice in it, and my delicate Paleo palate thinks this is somewhat sweet. I will be more careful about my ingredients next time and make sure there is no sweetener. It did not rise quite as much as I had hoped, but it is delicious. I think I’ll have this batch with jam and next time around attempt a sandwich. After all the green bread comments, I may try sunflower seed butter instead! I made sweet potato biscuits with purple sweet potatoes, which produced a turquoise biscuit. So why not green bread? I think this is a terrific basic recipe, and I’m already thinking of ways to adapt it to create Paleo versions of some of my favorite wheat flour recipes 🙂
NeanderThin: Eat Like a Caveman to Achieve a Lean, Strong, Healthy Body (Hardcover) by Ray Audette, with Troy Gilchrist, was one of the early paleo diet authors. His home page NeanderThin [now restored from archive.org] has a diet based on the ideas of paleolithic nutrition. The diet can be followed as a low-carb, moderate or high carb diet, depending upon whether and how much fruit is used. You can read up through page 19 of the book at Google Books. The original press release from 1999. [The webmaster has an extra copy with the author's signature for sale. It has the original lime-purple cover. Pristine new condition. $60 (shipping included). Paypal only. Use e-mail link at page bottom.] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=doCDdxv7ZQ4
I just made a loaf of this last night. I followed the recipe to a T since it was the first time making. It has a very nice flavor but I would not regard it as an ideal sandwich bread. It has the texture of a light banana bread and even using a smaller loaf pan it made a tiny loaf, didn’t rise much. This is a good bread for toast but it is drier on the ends of the loaf and crumbles easily. I think if I were to make again I might use 1 and 1/2 the quantities listed and I would only bake for 30 minutes.
It’s easy to find more guidance online, but a book also makes a handy reference. "The Paleo Diet," for example, outlines basic Paleo principles and offers three “levels” that allow for different degrees of cheating – three “open meals” per week on the “entry level” plan, two on “maintenance” and just one on “maximal.” Depending on the level, you might also get “transitional” condiments (low-fat dressing and salsa) and drinks (coffee, beer or wine in moderation) to wash down the meat and plants. You can use the levels as you like. Start with the first and move gradually to the more restrictive – or just stay put. For more dramatic changes, head right to the third. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CeEcNmmiyNM
Well, I took the chance and sprayed my glass bread “pan” with non-stick spray instead of using the parchment paper and it worked great! My bread turned out just like your photo and it is very tasty. Now I must share how it started out though because this little loaf of heaven cost me a lot of money. I am very clumsy and this event proved that. I managed to bump something and knocked my glass bowl I started working with onto the floor and shattered into a million pieces, not only that but my iPad flew off the counter with it and the glass on the iPad is also shattered, but for now, it is still working. I lost a half cup of almond butter in the mess but that loss was insignificant in the overall scheme of things and I had enough to complete my task of making a loaf of this yummy bread so for that I am truly grateful. I am dying for a cucumber tomato sandwich which is why I wanted some bread. I grew my own tomatoes and cucumber and now need to sprout some broccoli sprouts to have on that sandwich! I can’t wait. On my test piece, I spread some of that yummy almond butter on it and had that for supper with a glass of goats milk. I have leaky gut and find that a Paleo diet works the best with the least amount of stress for me. I felt much better today than I have in years, so maybe, I am finally getting well, but not sure yet so don’t want to get my hopes up too high, but am very optimistic! Noticed when I was at work that I actually felt almost well today! Only worked 3 hours but there was a definite improvement. I will be exploring the rest of your site. Thanks for posting this! Yummy!

Thank you Elena! I Used a 500g William Sonoma non-stick loaf pan (a tad larger than suggested) and ground whole brown flax seeds in my spice grinder because I had them on hand in the freezer. Also, mixed in a small amount of unblanched almond flour with the blancheds because I had some to use up and used my grandmother’s old manual hand mixer rather than a food processor (don’t own one). My apartment smelled absolutely delicious when this was baking… nutty, earthy, eggy… I suspect the addition of the unblanched flour and regular flax deepened the color and flavor of the final product. It doesn’t look at all like your bread but rather has a deep brown multigrain look and cracked top. Even took some pictures. Very happy with this one. Easy, tasty, and so much better looking and tasting than most gf bread I’ve had. Texture is consistent all the way through and slices beautifully. I’ve sworn off the stuff but this wholesome paleo-friendly loaf has me sold. Can’t wait to try it on a sandwich tomorrow. So sick of salads for lunch. BTW tried the rosemary crackers last week and they were fantastic as well.

Wowwwww!!! This is amazing. I had to change the recipe a bit (I followed the top recipe) because of lack of ingredients. I used Raw Almond Flour (not blanched); I used only three eggs + one chia egg + one flax egg; and my pan was about 8.5*4, so a bit bigger than recommended; I did not use the food processor, just mixed everything with a whisk and a spoon. Even though the pan was larger the height was great, and I’ve never had such a moist bread. Incredible! It is so delicious and wonderful. And so easy to make!! Thank you so much- I haven’t eaten anything like this since quitting gluten. This will be my go-to bread from now on.

Made this bread last night to go with our homemade soup. We really liked it. I didn’t have greek yogurt so I used 1/4 cup whole milk yogurt and 1/4 cup sour cream. I also added a tiny bit of honey for sweetness. It turned out beautiful! Baked for 35 minutes. Have made many other gluten free breads and some were terrible and some just O.K. , but this is the best one we have tried. Great recipe! Can’t wait to try it toasted. Thanks so much!
My stomach has been very upset lately because of grains, but when my stomach is burning and nauseated, bread or crackers is what I need to settle it, which I knew was a big no no (wheat is what made me sick). Then I stumbled on this recipe and all I can say is “Praise the Lord!”. Thank you so very much for sharing this. I made my own almond/sunflower seed butter and used chai meal in lieu of the flax and it turned out moist, fluffy, and surprisingly tasty! This blows away the gluten-free bread that I was eating for the past few years (I have tried them all) and the fact that it’s yeast and grain free is absolute heaven because I have candida and both mess me up. Thank you, thank you, thank you!!!! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kyZ95ohpKjs

Hi Tessa, it’s hard to say what went wrong if you said you used all of the exact same ingredients as I do, and you follow the directions. The only thing I can think of is how you’re measuring your ingredients. Adding more yogurt or milk will not help and may make your bread very soggy. Let me know what happens when you try again. I will make a video showing the process soon.
I am excited about this recipe for Paleo Sandwich Bread because even though it is completely grain and gluten free, it tastes amazing and the consistency is moist and soft just like the sandwich breads we were used to before changing our diet. In my opinion though, there is also a tiny hint of sweetness to it and this is due to the almond flour being sweeter than grain wheat flour.
Hi Tessa, it’s hard to say what went wrong if you said you used all of the exact same ingredients as I do, and you follow the directions. The only thing I can think of is how you’re measuring your ingredients. Adding more yogurt or milk will not help and may make your bread very soggy. Let me know what happens when you try again. I will make a video showing the process soon.
wow, I have tried to make a good gluten free bread for about a year and this tops all of the recipes I’ve tried. I have to agree with the comment that most gluten-free/grain-free breads are eggy … this one is not and it tastes great. I just enjoyed a piece with boursin tomato pesto. Thank you for the great recipe. I will be trying many more of your recipes. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ni9XJ90f-Bc
Hi Nancy, this recipe does not make enough batter to properly fill a full sized loaf pan. So, if you use the recommended size baking pan, the bread will be the proper height. If you use a pan that is bigger than the one I used, your bread will rise, but it won’t fill the pan to the right height. Here’s an example that might help –if you place 1/2 cup of water in a 1/2 measuring cup it will be 100% full to the top of the cup. If you put the same 1/2 cup of water in a 1 cup measuring cup it will only fill it 50% and will only be 1/2 full in height. That’s why a loaf pan that is too large doesn’t work for this recipe when it comes to the height of the loaf :-)
To get an idea of what that means, we turned to the experts, including Loren Cordain, PhD, a professor emeritus at Colorado State University in Fort Collins, Colorado, and the author of The Paleo Diet; Erin Holley, RD, of Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center in Columbus, Ohio; and Lona Sandon, PhD, RD, an assistant professor of clinical nutrition at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas.

I’m new to the whole GF thing – I don’t have a physical need/condition for eating grain free, but the whole concept of this healthy way of eating intrigues me, so I’m just “testing the waters.” It is very generous that Elana shares her recipes for free so that I can give it a try before jumping in with both feet – and when/if I do, I’ll be buying her recipe books. Great blog. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rqPcH8zEStw

Hi Chocmak , thank you for your feedback. I am happy in the end you were able to find the arrowroot and your bread turned out good. The cost of the ingredients here in the US are not cheap either but I save money by buying online and in bulk. I have a link to the ingredients and brands just below the recipe. If for some reason you can’t purchase these from Amazon, you can probably purchase these ingredients directly from the company and have them shipped to you. You may be able to find arrowroot in asian sores as well.
I followed this recipe meticulously…but this “bread” is nothing like sandwich bread. Extremely dense and super fatty (greasy) and my son can’t pick it up without it falling apart for a school lunch (Exactly what I wanted it for). I used the coconut cream instead of yogurt and homemade almond flour which was super fine from a quick final mix in the Vitamix. I’ll use it up with Jelly but I couldn’t imagine adding more fat to it like butter or almond butter…it already qualifies as a paper weight LOL.

Hi there, it’s Lacey! I’m the editor and main writer for A Sweet Pea Chef. I'm a food blogger, health and food coach, professional photographer, and mommy of three. I also run the awesome free Take Back Your Health Community, am the healthy and clean weekly meal planner behind No-Fail Meals, and a little bit in love with Clean Eating. Be sure to check out my free beginner’s guide to eating clean and follow me on YouTube and Instagram to get my latest recipes and healthy eating inspiration. Read More… https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0KQgyfPixmw

This is one of the best gluten-free bread recipes I’ve tried. I made mine in a 9 x 5 loaf pan. It’s a little vertically challenged, but it still tastes good and has a nice texture to it. I’m a recovering carb-junkie who realized the one thing I craved most was likely a factor in decades worth of digestive grief. As an experiment, I eliminated wheat products from my diet and my digestive health has shown significant improvement. But I have so missed my morning toast with peanut butter. This bread is a great replacement, one that’s both tasty and nutritious (unlike store bought GF bread). It’s delicious with peanut butter, jam, butter, or just on its own. Thank you for the wonderful recipe!
Hi Maya, I have made this twice and the first was actually closer than the second! The second one was raised really well when I put the foil on for the last 10-15 mins of cook time and when I took it out 12 mins later it had completely fallen! Now it is almost wet in the center though there are air pockets in it, it’s very odd. The first loaf was pretty flat the whole time and I am pretty sure that was because I didn’t have my egg whites whipped enough but they were spot on for the second loaf. I am also thinking it might be my baking powder after reading some of the comments. I plan to try again and just use a baking soda/cream of tartar mix rather than the baking powder. Any other suggestions? Anyone? LOL!

The Great Cholesterol Con by Anthony Colpo. The definitive book on the non-dangers of dietary cholesterol and saturated fat was The Cholesterol Myths by Uffe Ravnskov, 2000. This book is six years newer. Its forward is by Uffe Ravnskov. To get a wonderful description of the book read the leading review at Amazon. The many reviews there average to 5 stars. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0U1qQM2vV_E
The Stone Age Diet: Based on in-depth studies of human ecology and the diet of man by Walter L. Voegtlin. This was self-published back in 1975. Only a couple hundred copies were printed and distributed to friends and relatives. No one knew the book existed until some years later. In no way is he the father of the paleo diet. It is impossible to purchase. Apparently his descendents are planning a reprint, though the book is poorly written and not based upon factual anthropological information that even was available then. We have put up his Functional and Structural Comparison of Man's Digestive Tract with that of a Dog and Sheep. And a PDF can be found here. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PKF5zGzOkyo

Thank you for the terrific recipe. I must admit that this really turned out to be “oopsie bread” for me. Due to the expensive nature of the recipe (organic eggs, almond flour, grass fed butter) I really attempted to follow the recipe perfectly instead of going with my usual improvisational style. I also do not have a food processor however that did not impede anything… a hand mixer and a deft hand did the trick. I did add the optional xanthum gum and erythritol but not the cream of tartar. The batter filled my silicone loaf pan to the top, I smoothed it out and popped it into the oven. Then, to my horror, I saw the little pot of melted butter still on the stovetop. There was nothing to be done except cross my fingers and hope for the best.
Wonderful recipe; made it today and will make it again. Two changes I had to make: having no golden milled flax, I had brown flax seeds which I ground in my food processor, (didn’t get as fine as milled). Also had no arrowroot, so used tapioca flour. Delighted with the results. It rose beautifully, had to bake it a few more minutes; the top was a bit less smooth than yours, and the texture is probably a bit different due to fax seed not being as fine as milled. It is still a keeper as it holds together well after slicing. My husband (not paleo) made disparaging remarks when I told him I was making paleo bread, but he ate two thick slices with butter before I snatched it away. He says it won’t hold together for sandwich, but I will make him eat his words tomorrow. Thanks for the wonderful recipe! When this is gone, I am going to make the multi-seed and nut bread.
The data for Cordain's book only came from six contemporary hunter-gatherer groups, mainly living in marginal habitats.[37] One of the studies was on the !Kung, whose diet was recorded for a single month, and one was on the Inuit.[37][38][39] Due to these limitations, the book has been criticized as painting an incomplete picture of the diets of Paleolithic humans.[37] It has been noted that the rationale for the diet does not adequately account for the fact that, due to the pressures of artificial selection, most modern domesticated plants and animals differ drastically from their Paleolithic ancestors; likewise, their nutritional profiles are very different from their ancient counterparts. For example, wild almonds produce potentially fatal levels of cyanide, but this trait has been bred out of domesticated varieties using artificial selection. Many vegetables, such as broccoli, did not exist in the Paleolithic period; broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, and kale are modern cultivars of the ancient species Brassica oleracea.[29]
One question, when I released this bread out of the pan there was a very strong ammonia smell coming from the bread. After it cooled this ammonia smell was gone. I’m just curious what could cause that odor? Is it a reaction from the almond flour? I was just caught off guard when I bent over to get a whiff of the freshly baked loaf and it smelled of ammonia! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OxF2u_3URxs
Hi! I made this bread today and the taste is amazing! The only problem with mine is that it didn’t rise even a little. Yours looks lighter, light not dense. Mine was very dense and even though I cooked it longer still darker and not quite cooked enough in the inside (but the outside was very done). The only thing I did different was I used Brown flax meal and 3 duck eggs because they’re bigger than chicken eggs. The taste was amazing so I would think if I could get it too rise a bit and not be so dense it would be perfect! Do you think adding an extra egg would help out maybe just a egg white since duck have a bit more yolk? Thank you for this recipe! I’m going to try again soon!
This raisin bread will have you wondering if it really is Paleo, or if you’ve just cheated on your diet program. But no worries, everything checks out and you can eat this in moderation just like anything else dubbed acceptable. With ingredients like sweet potatoes, coconut flour, eggs, butter, and raisins, how can you go wrong? She’s managed to exclude all of the things that give the body a hard time in regards to digesting and processing, and replaced them with items that are known to be easy to digest and absorb. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fIR_wKNQIYs

The Hiwi gather and hunt a diverse group of plants and animals from the savannas, forests, rivers and swamps. Their main sources of meat are capybara, collared peccary, deer, anteater, armadillo, and feral cattle, numerous species of fish, and at least some turtle species. Less commonly consumed animals include iguanas and savanna lizards, wild rabbits, and many birds. Not exactly the kind of meat Paleo dieters and others in urban areas can easily obtain.


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This is great! I have tried GF bread recipes numerous times, to no avail… which was very disheartening, since I can make wonderful wheat bread without even thinking about it! But THIS recipe turned out great! It made a fluffy, moist bread that held up to slicing, holding burgers, everything you could want in a bread! And it couldn’t get any simpler to make. I doubled the recipe and baked in a loaf pan for 30min as suggested above, since I don’t have the rings, and it was great. Thank you for an awesome recipe!
A decade ago, when I was on the low-fat craze, I’d make fluffy cakes using no butter/fat, replacing it with apple sauce, which gives moisture and a soft texture. These days, I’m a low-carb girl, but a 1/4 cup of apple sauce divided by 4 = only 1 tablespoon (per roll/per 2nd day). I’m okay with that, especially because I substitute half the tapioca flour (high-carb) for whey protein powder to cut a few carbs that way. 🙂

Diane, I have successfully made this recipe with almond “milk” and cow’s milk (both whole milk and 2% milk work), but I haven’t tried this recipe with hemp milk or coconut milk. If you want to play with it, I would try hemp milk because the higher fat content of coconut milk may significantly alter the recipe. If you give it a try, let me know how it goes!
Sounds like your baking soda is old and/or spoiled. It explains the lack of rise, tingling tongue, chemical taste (washing soda [sodium carbonate, I think] is made by heating baking soda [sodium bicarbonate] in big ovens), and maybe the extra salty flavor, too. I’ve had bad baking soda spoil baked goods, and it’s a real bummer. Hope you try again, though.
The theory is our bodies were designed, and still optimized, to eat what our Paleolithic ancestors ate. Like your hunger-gatherer forefathers, on Paleo you get all the meat from wild animals and unlimited fruits and vegetables you can eat. But no starchy vegetables (like potatoes), no legumes (like lentils or beans), no wheat, and no grains (like quinoa or corn) because those plants were invented by human beings during the agricultural revolution after our Paleolithic ancestors left the planet. You get one cheat day where you can eat whatever you want (“Occasional cheating and digressions may be just what you need to help you stick to the diet.”) No oil because it puts omega 6 and omega 3 ratios out of whack which should never exceed 2:1, except olive oil if you must. Dairy is also prohibited. And meat must come from animals that weren’t fed grains (like corn) because grains lead to inflammation and increased fat.
I’m new to the paleo lifestyle, if I’m honest I’m new to healthy non fast food lifestyle as well. I have recently undergone gastric sleeve surgery and had thought I would never be able to eat a sandwich ever again. Then I found the Paleo food movement and in particular your site. I have tried a lot of your recipes and this bread is my favorite. I love how moist it is and that it remains fresh for a full week. It also freezes well too. Thank you so much for re-introducing me to the sandwich.
While I haven’t made this recipe, I’ve used flaxmeal in a lot of muffin recipes, and on a occasion I’ve noticed those same gossamer-type strings after a few days. My best guess is it has something to do with flax, although I’m not sure what causes them to develop. Some recipes I use flaxmeal in never develop the strings, and some do, but it definitely only happens in breads where I use flaxmeal. I think the food is still safe to eat though! I wish I knew exactly what causes it too…
Fresh fruits, fresh vegetables, fresh meat—the paleo diet is all about eating foods straight from the Earth just as our ancestors did. Those ancestors didn't have livestock or crops to call their own, so Cordain advises to go with grass-fed and organic varieties whenever possible to limit exposure to pesticides, antibiotics, and other chemicals that didn't exist back then. Research from Emory University suggests that Paleolithic people obtained about 35% of their calories from fats, 35% from carbohydrates, and 30% from protein.
By latest count, about 800 Hiwi live in palm thatched huts in Colombia and Venezuela. In 1990 Ana Magdalena Hurtado and Kim Hill—now both at Arizona State University in Tempe—published a thorough study (pdf) of the Hiwi diet in the neotropical savannas of the Orinoco River basin in Southwestern Venezuela. Vast grasslands with belts of forest, these savannas receive plenty of rain between May and November. From January through March, however, precipitation is rare: the grasses shrivel, while lakes and lagoons evaporate. Fish trapped in shrinking pools of water are easy targets for caiman, capybaras and turtles. In turn, the desiccating lakes become prime hunting territory for the Hiwi. During the wet season, however, the Hiwi mainly hunt for animals in the forest, using bows and arrows.
Thanks for reading this post. Of these recipes, pick one that sounds good to, and try it. These are all good recipes and fairly easy to make, I like to make the Cheesy Tapioca Flatbread, as its pretty quick and tastes great. I’ve got lots of paleo resources and recipes on here, so click around to find out more about paleo. Keep me posted on how things go and always feel free to share a story or ask a question.
Now make the crust: Preheat your oven to 350 degrees. Line an 8x8 square pan with parchment paper and lightly grease. Combine all of the crust ingredients into a food processor and pulse until mixture is crumbly. Take mixture and carefully distribute over the parchment paper, pressing down firmly and evenly. Place inside the oven and bake for 13 minutes, or until lightly golden brown. Remove from oven and let cool for 20 minutes. Leave the oven hot.
I so miss bread fresh from the oven (I’m going to be adding the yeast)! You are absolutely correct about beaten egg whites creating air pockets. My family has always made buttermilk pancakes from scratch and we always separate the eggs, beat the whites to soft peaks and fold them in at the last minute. The pancakes rise beautifully! Have you tried this with your keto pancakes?
But human populations in different regions of the world ate a variety of diets. Some ate more; some ate less. They likely ate meat only when they could get it, and then they gorged. Richard Wrangham, author of Catching Fire: How Cooking Made Us Human, says diets from around the world ranged greatly in the percentage of calories from meat. It’s not cooked meat that made us human, he says, but rather cooked food. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S2wGrYngpJ0
But how can we convince folks to give it a try? “I think we have to lead with pleasure,” he says. Aside from the many health benefits, cooking is also “one of the most interesting things humans know how to do and have done for a very long time. And we get that, or we wouldn’t be watching so much cooking on TV. There is something fascinating about it. But it’s even more fascinating when you do it yourself.”
Jazzmin, you are correct and the active cultures in the yogurt will not survive during baking. However, the reason why I mentioned those facts about yogurt on my post is because a lot of people following a paleo diet simply won’t eat dairy because at one point dairy was classified as “not paleo”. There are so many amazing health benefits from eating fermented foods and raw, organic dairy from pasture raised animals that I feel it is important to educate people.
So I’m pretty familiar with the science of baking, and I also understand there’s significant differences when omitting gluten. The recipe calls for sour cream, and vinegar, both acids that work best as leaveners when combined with baking soda, then baking powder (1 part soda 2 parts cream of tartar (another acid) and straight cream of tartar. So it calls for acid in four separate forms. In standard baking that calls for baking powder you add soda when adding additional acid such as sour cream, buttermilk etc… when a small amount of acid is added to bread dough it increases the yeasts ability to give lift by creating gluten, but to much kills the yeast entirely. So in the absence of gluten, isn’t the acid used here excessive? I wonder if a reduction would cause greater rise? What is the purpose of the baking powder combined with the yeast? Can you please explain the science behind this? P.S. the flavor of this was excellent but it didn’t rise as expected despite an excellent yeast test, fresh powder, and 1 hour in the proof box. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=og2X4Tb6LdE

Hi Becky! If you use the recommended size baking pan, the bread will be the proper height and you will be able to use it for sandwiches. If you use a pan that is bigger than the one I used, your bread won’t fill the pan up. Here’s an example –if you place 1/2 cup of water in a 1/2 measuring cup it will be 100% full to the top of the cup. If you put the same 1/2 cup of water in a 1 cup measuring cup it will only fill it 50% and will only be 1/2 full in height. That’s why a loaf pan that is too large doesn’t work for this recipe when it comes to the height of the loaf :-)
I am currently looking for a recipe to try in my recently acquired, but not-yet-used silicone challah mold (https://www.amazon.com/Amazing-Perfect-Silicone-Bakeware-Braiding/dp/B005NAGY8O). Our family eats gluten-free, with a strong leaning towards a whole foods/Paleo diet. My husband and I are happy to enjoy a Shabbat dinner sans challah, though our 8- and 5-year-old daughters are very disappointed (especially when we are at synagogue and we ask them not to have any of the challah) to be missing out.

The Primal Blueprint Cookbook: Primal, Low Carb, Paleo, Grain-Free, Dairy-Free and Gluten-Free by Mark Sisson and Jennifer Meier. Recipes include: Roasted Leg of Lamb with Herbs and Garlic, Salmon Chowder with Coconut Milk, Tomatoes Stuffed with Ground Bison and Eggs, and Baked Chocolate Custard. Recipes are simple and have limited ingredients. Complaints are the book is stuffed with unnecessary photos and proofreading could have been better, e.g. oven temperatures were left out. And recipes are not truly paleo. Despite what is on the cover dairy is used in some recipes. The Amazon reviews average to 4+ stars.


I love this bread, and so do my German, bread-loving children! Hearty, rich German bread is the best in the world so that’s no small praise. I have a regular glass loaf pan, and adapt the recipe to make a full-size loaf. I add 1 extra egg (very large) and increase other ingredients 25%. Baking time is usually 5-10 minutes longer, although I reduce the temperature to 325 after it begins to brown to compensate for the glass pan. Topped with butter or pumpkin seed butter, this is my 3-year-old son’s favorite “treat” ever! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_6RGTb3Yki0
This just got done cooling. I made 1/2 a recipe because I only have a mini food processor. I baked it in a mini loaf pan and it is delicious. :) I’m so excited to have a bread I can eat almond butter and jelly sandwiches on (which is what I’m doing right now). I did use Trader Joe’s almond meal because that’s what I have on hand and it still turned out well. I would imagine it would be even better with the right almond flour though, but even this is delicious and a great texture. :) Thank you Elana!!!!!

Bread was phenomenal!! I followed the recipe exactly, I had a bread pan that was about an inch wider than yours but bread still rose. Looks great, looks just like a loaf of banana bread! The bread is very buttery in flavor, I can’t have more than one slice it’s pretty rich. It’s a dense bread like banana bread. I was SO excited when I pulled it out of the oven and it looked and tasted good I did a little “I made BREAD!” dance. Alas, bread, I have missed you… https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CSrH4elI5uc

Michele, this is the most delicious bread and can’t believe it’s paleo. So easy to make and keep. After a few days of keeping it out, I cut the rest into slices, put slice sized parchment paper between each one and freeze. I save the parchment for future loaves. Getting ready to make another one. It’s so delicious! Thank you for all your attempts to perfect it. YUM!!
Hello! I was wondering if you had ever doubled or tripled the recipe in order to use a standard size loaf pan? I wasn’t paying attention to the size and made a regular recipe in a standard loaf pan and the results were, well, flat. Then I realized my goof. Hoping to avoid the purchase of another pan, but will definitely buy a new one if it means I can make this bread! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d0Zz6z5GaVE
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The Dietitian's Guide to Eating Bugs by Daniel Calder is a comprehensive guide to the nutritional content of insects. He believes insect breeding and consumption are important elements sustainable living, particularly when it comes to complementing foraged plant material with meat products. Numerous insects contain nutrients similar to those found in more conventional livestock, except the feed to conversion ratio is much higher and they're much cheaper to breed. You can find the book at scribd. Also available in e-book format for $35. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dBb060OPegg
Here is your chance to make pumpkin bagels that can help usher in fall, and also are great any time of the year. They are made with real pumpkin of course, as well as a host of additional ingredients to make them taste great without being bad for you in any way. Just be sure to follow the Paleo instructions, as this is a multi-purpose recipe but they’ve included the necessary substitutes to keep it Paleo. These taste great with grass-fed butter on them, and you can even try using a Paleo-friendly cream cheese if you feel up to it.
The Paleo diet, also referred to as the caveman or Stone-Age diet, includes lean meats, fish, fruits, vegetables, nuts, and seeds. Proponents of the diet emphasize choosing low-glycemic fruits and vegetables. There is debate about several aspects of the Paleo diet: what foods actually existed at the time, the variation in diets depending on region (e.g., tropical vs. Arctic), how modern-day fruits and vegetables bear little resemblance to prehistoric wild versions, and disagreement among Paleo diet enthusiasts on what is included/excluded from the diet. Because of these differences, there is not one “true” Paleo diet.
Dessert is the hardest bad habit to break when you commit to a new and improved healthy eating resolution. The good news is that there are SO many natural alternatives, you can easily hack a way to #TreatYoSelf to your favorite sweets. We’ve seen healthy bean desserts become all the rage, and most of them are refined sugar-free and Paleo-friendly. Since chocolate is everyone’s go-to treat of choice, healthy chocolate recipes are also quite coveted in the diet world. Lucky for you, we dug up 18 Paleo chocolate desserts that are so indulgent, you won’t believe they’re secretly good for you.
It’s hard to believe these snowball cookies have no flour in them when you see and taste them. But that doesn’t mean they have no flavor. These no-bake balls are bound together with Medjool dates, pecans and shredded coconut, with vanilla extract and sea salt packing a punch as well. These are a terrific treat to bring to a potluck or to nibble on guilt-free.
I didn’t have almond flour so substituted 1 cup millet flour and 1 cup sorghum flour for the almond flour, and baked in an 7.5″ x 4.5″ x 2.5″ loaf pan. The loaf was short, about 1.5″ tall, the texture was pleasantly dense and held together well. The taste, however, was pasty (like flour) and the bread was dry. (I noticed afterwards that the sorghum flour package said to substitute 15-20% sorghum flour in your recipe, so that may have affected the taste and dryness.) I tried a slice with a topping of honey, and that was pretty good, but not good enough. So I made croutons, which were delicious. I cut the bread into small cubes and spread them on a cookie sheet, sprayed them with olive oil spray and drizzled 1/2 stick of butter over them, then seasoned generously with Nature’s Seasonings and garlic powder (for a richer crouton, could also sprinkle with parmesan cheese). I tossed them to distribute the seasonings and baked them at 350 degrees about 20 minutes until crunchy. I’ll try the recipe again when I have almond flour. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jQDpobq7jYY&t=91s
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