Argh! I’ve literally made 4 different recipes today for yeast free/gluten free breads, and every last one has been a fail. This one is in the oven as I write (please let it be good!). I had to sub a flour because hubby can’t have almond products so I will keep that in mind if it’s not perfect, but seems to at least have potential. I also only had duck eggs, which are large, so used 3 instead of 4 (can’t have chicken eggs either). I will let you know how it turned out! Thanks for the recipe!
The Paleo diet not only misunderstands how our own species, the organisms inside our bodies and the animals and plants we eat have evolved over the last 10,000 years, it also ignores much of the evidence about our ancestors' health during their—often brief—individual life spans (even if a minority of our Paleo ancestors made it into their 40s or beyond, many children likely died before age 15). In contrast to Grok, neither Paleo hunter–gatherers nor our more recent predecessors were sculpted Adonises immune to all disease. A recent study in The Lancet looked for signs of atherosclerosis—arteries clogged with cholesterol and fats—in more than one hundred ancient mummies from societies of farmers, foragers and hunter–gatherers around the world, including Egypt, Peru, the southwestern U.S and the Aleutian Islands. "A common assumption is that atherosclerosis is predominately lifestyle-related, and that if modern human beings could emulate preindustrial or even preagricultural lifestyles, that atherosclerosis, or least its clinical manifestations, would be avoided," the researchers wrote. But they found evidence of probable or definite atherosclerosis in 47 of 137 mummies from each of the different geographical regions. And even if heart disease, cancer, obesity and diabetes were not as common among our predecessors, they still faced numerous threats to their health that modern sanitation and medicine have rendered negligible for people in industrialized nations, such as infestations of parasites and certain lethal bacterial and viral infections.

You’ll lose weight because any time you restrict entire food groups, your calorie intake tends to be lower, Sandon says. And whenever you burn more calories than you consume, you'll have weight loss, she says. (2) The focus on lean protein, fruits, and vegetables over calorie- and sodium-rich processed foods can also contribute to weight loss, though she also points out that the paleo diet wasn’t created to be a weight loss diet. (3)
Evolutionary biologist Marlene Zuk writes that the idea that our genetic makeup today matches that of our ancestors is misconceived, and that in debate Cordain was "taken aback" when told that 10,000 years was "plenty of time" for an evolutionary change in human digestive abilities to have taken place.[4]:114 On this basis Zuk dismisses Cordain's claim that the paleo diet is "the one and only diet that fits our genetic makeup".[4] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cwP8C9wjYaY

Saturated fat has been demonized by our health authorities and media. What is the basis for this position on Saturated fat? Are current recommendations for VERY low saturated fat intake justified? How much saturated fat (and what types), if any should one eat? Without a historical and scientific perspective these questions can be nearly impossible to answer. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_UuDFkXxEnI
One question, when I released this bread out of the pan there was a very strong ammonia smell coming from the bread. After it cooled this ammonia smell was gone. I’m just curious what could cause that odor? Is it a reaction from the almond flour? I was just caught off guard when I bent over to get a whiff of the freshly baked loaf and it smelled of ammonia! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OxF2u_3URxs
Getting the grains out is pretty much the top priority when you make a bread that is Paleo approved. That’s what we’re seeing here is the use of coconut flour instead of wheat-based flour. You’re going to get a milky taste from this because they’ve used almond milk, and a creamy taste because there’s cashew butter. This should give the bread a smoothness that you won’t find with other breads on the list, which might make it preferable to some, and others may prefer the other types made out of almond flour or that contain flax meal.

The Paleo diet, also referred to as the "caveman" or "Stone Age" diet, stems from the eating patterns of our ancestors who lived during the Paleolithic era, a time period associated with the development of mankind's tool-making skills, ending around 12,000 years ago. During that time, the women gathered fruit, berries, and vegetables, while the men hunted for meat. In today's modern era, the diet involves mimicking the same eating habits and consuming fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, healthful oils (eg, walnut, olive, coconut, and avocado), meat, fish, shellfish, poultry, and eggs in hopes of leading to a more healthful and disease-free life. The diet also encourages consumption of cage-free eggs and grass-fed meats (lean meat is recommended). It prohibits eating grains, dairy, legumes, potatoes, refined sugar, and refined vegetable oils, because proponents claim these foods appeared only after the agricultural revolution and are associated with inflammation and therefore many chronic conditions including heart disease, cancer, and diabetes. Not only is the diet touted as a more healthful eating pattern but it's also promoted as beneficial for weight loss.
You don’t always have to have ordinary bread when it comes to Paleo bread, and this recipe lets you have focaccia bread, which can really open the doors for a lot of gourmet sandwiches. Picture some nice organic roasted turkey breast resting between a few slices of focaccia, and some nice grilled vegetables to top it off. That’s the sort of meal that will leave you totally satisfied, and won’t put a dent in your waistline. The use of flaxseed meal, almond flour, whole eggs, and Extra Virgin Olive oil keeps you on the approved foods list and results in zero guilt.
Interestingly, all of these seemingly unrelated diseases share a common cause: damage to the intestinal lining which allows large, undigested food particles to make their way into the body. This is called “leaky gut and the autoimmune response”. Here is a 7-part video series by Prof. Loren Cordain describing the etiology of Multiple Sclerosis. And please watch this TED talk by Dr. Terry Wahls, MD as she describes how she reversed her Multiple Sclerosis with a paleo diet. If you have an autoimmune disease you might consider trying the autoimmune protocol of the paleo diet. If you do, please tell us about your experience.
Thanks for taking the time to post the Metric measures Pat. I’ve just made my first loaf, which is ok but I misread the ingredients and only put 1/2 tsp of baking powder in the mix ..duh! There’s another one baking right now with the correct amount in . Really looking forward to it. I’m going to slice it up and freeze it in portions so I can take out what I need and toast it. The only downside for me is the almond flour and coconut flour is very expensive in the uk. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AeqwyVcRp7E

Hi Mindy – same here. But I did read in a comment about 1 or 2 years ago the same thing. From what I remember from those comments, others said the type of food we make from Elana’s baked recipes are just not designed to sit for more than 2 – 3 days. Other commenters chimed in and said their family eats up everything they bake, so nothing sits long enough to get the 3-day-old smell.
The paleo diet (also nicknamed the caveman diet, primal diet, Stone Age diet, and hunter-gatherer diet) is hugely popular these days, and goes by one simple question: What would a caveman eat? Here, we explain what the paleo diet involves, its pros and cons, and, ultimately, what a modern person needs to know to decide whether or not to take the paleo diet plunge.
Joel Runyon is the founder of Ultimate Paleo Guide and CEO of Paleo Meal Plans. He's a precision nutrition, and Gym Jones Level 1 certified, and helped millions of people get healthy and lose weight since 2012. Joel is also an ultra runner and endurance athlete - and in 2017, he became the the youngest person to run an ultra marathon on every continent in the world to build 7 schools with Pencils of Promise in developing countries.Follow him on Twitter, Instagram, Athlinks and read his full bio here.
Thank you soooo much for posting this recipe. I have been eating grain free and paleo since mid December and have been craving a nice sandwich. I have tried several bread recipes, but have found them to be dry, this bun recipe is AWESOME. It is moist, tasty and doesn’t fall apart — delish and sure has added a lot of new choices to my menu. It is awesome toasted which adds even more — BLTs here I come. So easy to make. I use a 4″ silicone mold to make mine and they are absolutely perfect.

NeanderThin: Eat Like a Caveman to Achieve a Lean, Strong, Healthy Body (Hardcover) by Ray Audette, with Troy Gilchrist, was one of the early paleo diet authors. His home page NeanderThin [now restored from archive.org] has a diet based on the ideas of paleolithic nutrition. The diet can be followed as a low-carb, moderate or high carb diet, depending upon whether and how much fruit is used. You can read up through page 19 of the book at Google Books. The original press release from 1999. [The webmaster has an extra copy with the author's signature for sale. It has the original lime-purple cover. Pristine new condition. $60 (shipping included). Paypal only. Use e-mail link at page bottom.] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=doCDdxv7ZQ4
Hi Elana, first let me say this bread is DELICIOUS! It turned out sweet, very moist, and just wonderful. HOWEVER, I am new to gluten free baking and despite the deliciousness of the bread, I ended up with a very faint ammonia-ish smell/after-taste and for the life of me I cannot figure out why. The only difference in the way I made my bread from your recipe is that I used whole, raw almond meal and whole, raw flaxseed meal, because that is what I had on hand. Oh and i used pure maple syrup instead of honey. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xs9JZayv4xA

I forgot to say I used half al one flour and half sunflower seed flour.. I double the batch and I found if I let it sit for about 25 min, then put it in the oven it gets thicker as it sits and I still have to bake it for an hour. The tast is great. The next time I’m buying Honeyville flour and making it exactly like your recipe says. I’m just worried about mixing it to much. Mine is very dense and heavy. But yummy.
Made this bread the other night and it is so wonderful!!.Love it slightly warmed with a pat of butter.My only problem is that it did not rise that much so can’t really use for a sandwich.My eggs were not fresh nor my refrigerated flaxseed meal..I used a glass loaf pan (buttered).I did cook at 350 degrees for the 30 min and it came out wonderful!!Thanks so much for the recipe.I love the recipes with honey and/or stevia, sucanat or rapadura. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Fe4jOwAVbY
I am BLOWN away by this bread! I added up the protein and net carbs … umm … WOW. A huge bonus is that both kids – one of whom is crazy picky – AND my husband both love it!!!! They devoured the first loaf within a few hours. This will obviously be a huge staple in our house. It’s really a God-send. Our son, who is the picky eater, is mostly picky about proteins. He won’t eat any meat except for chicken, no eggs or dairy. We’ve gone gluten/casein free to see if it helps with his autism and as much as I totally wanted to eliminate bread, I finally just had to accept that he HAD to eat a peanut butter and honey sandwich at lunch. My cracker/veggie/peanut butter dip thing just wasn’t working. Not only will he EAT this bread – he wouldn’t eat the other gluten-free breads I was making – it is actually giving him the ONE thing he needs most – PROTEIN. Seriously, thank you, thank you, thank you!!!!!!!!!!!!! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YOGwEnwlDF4
Hi, Kaylie. It’s yummy! I just made the bread and ate 4(!) slices before slicing and freezing the rest. I followed the recipe exactly, using the same ingredients, measurements, temp. and baking time. I was surprised by the size of the finished loaf. It measured 3 7/8″ wide by 2″ high. I can’t imagine making a sandwich with slices that size! That said, it tastes great, and has a very good texture. At 35 minutes, I used a toothpick to see if it was baked through. The toothpick came out clean, but on slicing it, I think I’ll give it a few more minutes when I make it again. Thanks for the recipe.
Hi there, it’s Lacey! I’m the editor and main writer for A Sweet Pea Chef. I'm a food blogger, photographer, videographer, clean eating expert, and mommy of four. I also run the awesome free Take Back Your Health Community, am the healthy and clean weekly meal planner behind No-Fail Meals, and a little bit in love with Clean Eating. Be sure to check out my free beginner’s guide to eating clean and follow me on YouTube and Instagram to get my latest recipes and healthy eating inspiration.
I made the dinner rolls today and the recipe worked great. I lightly greased a muffin pan, used a scant half cup of batter for each roll, baked for 15-18 minutes and they are perfect for holiday dinners. My yeild was 13 rolls. Good thing there was extra, because I ate one hot from the oven. I also used coconut vinegar and coconut nectar instead of apple cider vinegar and honey. Yum, Yum, Yum https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SLoukoBs8TE
Hi Tiffanee! Let’s try and figure it out! More importantly- is your yeast proofing well (bubbling a lot?). And how and where are you proofing your bread? For instance, I place mine on top of the oven when its heating up (so the tray does get slightly warm). Be careful though not to overheat it as the yeast would die (it thrives between 79-100F to give you an idea). xo!
This must be so challenging and stressful for you, but know that young children can be very picky eaters. Typically young children like very bland, slightly sweet tasting foods, so I can see why he would like an almond butter and honey sandwich. If you can find a grain free bread that looks like the bread he likes to eat, use one slice of regular and one slice of grain-free (keeping the grain free on the bottom). And/or as he is resistant to grain free bread at this time, maybe focus on introducing other foods that he may enjoy such as cucumber, red pepper or apple slices, small pieces of cooked chicken or sweet potato and serve these with a side of almond butter to dip them into. Try introducing grain free crackers, cookies or muffins as well as paleo smoothies (into which you can sneak some greens), keep the portions small and offer him variety alongside his sandwich. He may also like the entire routine of meals and may enjoy the same meal at the kitchen table or in his highchair, so maybe packing a picnic and eating at the park might help him to try some new flavors. I hope these suggestions help, keep us posted on how things go.
And also I wanted to share that as far as converting measurements to grams…if you look on the bag it will tell you the conversion. For example, my almond flour is 1/4 cup = 28g. This is much more accurate than using a generic conversion chart. Had I used the one listed above in the comments I would have nearly doubled the amount of almond flour. This bread is sadly expensive for me to make…worth it, but expensive. I will be able to get two loaves from one $10 bag of almond flour. Counting eggs and all other ingredients, that’s pricey for 12 slices of bread. However, you get what you pay for, you know? Nutritious food isn’t always cheap, but for your body it should be necessary. I’m learning this as I go. Again, I appreciate this recipe so much!
However, I’ve made the Paleo bread twice and the same thing happened both times. The inside of the bread developed a huge hole and was not cooked. I’ve made the Paleo Pumpkin bread five times and had no problems, which makes me ask: since the Pumpkin bread bakes for 45 minutes, could there be a typo in this recipe and perhaps the bread should bake longer than 30 minutes?

hi Adriana! I tried this recipe but tweaked it a bit since I don’t have arrowroot flour. I used rice flour for the meantime cause it’s the only one I have here. Since I also have only one egg available, I reduced the other ingredients to 1/4 of the original. The recipe yielded one mini loaf bread. Tasty and tender texture like regular flour bread with a little gritty texture cause I just ground slivered almond in a seed grinder. But still loved the outcome. and it smells fantastic during baking. I posted the image in my instagram at http://instagram.com/karenieavila. Thank you for sharing your recipes to the world.:-)
I’ve made these twice now. First time – subbed coconut oil for the palm shortening – simply because I didn’t have any. Only had one egg so used a “chia” egg as well. Baked them in ramekins. Turned out wonderful!! Second time – baked them this morning – needed an “muffin” for my egg/kale breaky. This time used “tenderfake” – lard – again no palm shortening – used 2 real, free range, organic eggs. Baked them in standard muffin tins – once again – turned out beautifully! Especially when toasted 🙂
OMG-made this recipe for fun(I have no dietary restricions about gluten or grains or any allergies) Followed recipe exactly and used three 4″mini springform pans. These buns came out awesome! Texture and taste like real actual bread! Eating one wih chicken salad as I type! I’ve tried other bread recipes before using almond or coconut flours and never came out worthy of the effort and cost involved but these are amazing! I love that it is a small batch using simple minimal ingredients so u dont end up with a ton of something u can’t eat fast enough before it goes bad(not that these would even last that long if I quadrupled the recipe…!) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=urGzfAW70PY

Oh me… oh my. Back then, I would have pulled out the food processor, opened up my bulk bag of almonds and blended for a good 5-15 minutes ’til I got just the perfect smooth consistency of creamy almond butter. Then, carefully transfer that mess-prone goop (scientific name for nut butter consistency) into a large Tupperware, spend like 15 good minutes wiping off flecks of almond butter goop that had flown all over the kitchen, then wash all the dishes (you know how long this takes when you have almond butter grease staunchly refusing to let go of its dish territory), then dry all the dishes (because: counter space, ‘nuff said), then make these bars.
Hi Adriana, thanks for the amazing bread recipe you posted. I never buy bread as I don’t like to eat whole wheat . I made your bread and it was soooooooooo delicious! I finally can eat bread that doesn’t have any fillers in it! I used chia seeds instead of flaxseeds as I was of flax, and I used raw almond flour instead of blanched as that’s what I had available. I loved it! Thanks again!

I had the same effect but I used the same pan. The issue I had was the egg whites. I beat them with a mixer for 2 minutes with the cream of tartar and still couldn’t get them whipped. I’d say they were half whipped. I gave up and put them in the loan pan anyway. The bread looked the same and tasted great but it was somewhat spongy. I’m wondering if the egg whites really wouldn’t whip because I didn’t realize they had to be room temp. The bread is great but it won’t hold up for sandwiches. Any tips on egg whipping? I felt egg defeated today!

Oh, and by the way, I made the original recipe by mistake and it’s been wonderful! I have varied it to use 1C of almond flour, and the rest is coconut flour, and I accidentally left out the sea salt the first time, and it was great regardless! I hate salt anyways, but so far the original recipe works fine, and no tunnels in the middle. I did use the correct size pan as recommended, but I lined it.
I love this bread! Like many others, it needed about twice as long in the oven. I also add sunflower seeds to mine (which do turn green in subsequent days but still taste delicious!). This is a fantastic bread if you want something less eggy. It’s a little crumbly, so not really a bread to make a sandwich with, but delicious with a spread, by itself, or as an open face type sandwich. I use coconut cream in mine and Earth Balance soy free ‘butter’ to make it dairy free.
I just made the paleo bread and I am enjoying a warm slice as I type this comment. I wanted to share that I substituted pure maple syrup for the honey and used a blender to mix since I don’t own a food processor. The loaf still came out delicious and moist. I wish I could submit a picture of my wonderful looking loaf. Thanks for sharing your recipes.
This came out better than I expected it to actually. I did not have coconut flour so I added an extra 1/4c of almond meal. It was a tad bland but other than that a nice bread. I think the coconut flour would add to its flavor and sweetness. I will try again and add a banana just to give it a little more flavor. the pan I used was a regular loaf pan and it was a bit thin but otherwise a nice bread. My daughter enjoyed with peanutbutter and banana mashed together and I had it with her egg salad. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7h8FavH-Jx4

Made with peanut butter instead of almond butter because that’s what I had. I could taste the coconut (which I like), but I will try substituting butter for the coconut oil next time (or half butter half coconut oil), as I am trying to find a good sandwich bread recipe for my picky 5 year old. It’s like a banana bread consistency, but when lightly toasted with butter, reminds me of regular wheat bread. Delicious, and will definitely make again! Thank you for the recipe!
Worried, before I made this recipe I calculated the calories. Because just because something is healthy doesn’t mean you can eat as much as you want! I have an 8×4 inch loaf pan that it is baking in. 1/2 inch slices for an 8 inch pan are 134 calories per slice. Can’t wait to taste it when it’s done. I hope those slices are filling because I have a feeling they will be small. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DwVwQiqe4eM
Oils are trickier. Loren Cordain, Ph.D., founder of The Paleo Diet Movement, breaks down which oils are healthy on the paleo diet: olive, walnut, flaxseed, macadamia, avocado and coconut oils are all allowed because they were gathered directly from the plant. While our hunter-gatherer ancestors probably did not consume flaxseed oil, it is allowed because of its content of high alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), a type of heart-healthy, anti-inflammatory omega-3 fatty acid.
I have a processor but I use my big girl lifting weights mixer. I use the whip not the paddle to mix first the eggs getting in lots of air and and fold in 2 cups of thick yogurt cheese.(Regular non fat plain yogurt filtered though a coffee filter in the refrig.) I use the paddle and add the dry ingredients. I mix them on slow and just for a brief make sure that the dough it is all the same all the way through. I am seeing now whether I can replace the coconut oil with extra virgin elixir of the olives as sweet is not great with horseradish on roast beef. I’m also thinking that although it doesn’t rise much if at all that if I patted it into a loaf shape in some way and oiled the crust heavily it might have a smooth crust. and then plop it in the pan. I toast it like for egg in the hole by browning it in a heavy frying pan. Okay it is not bread bread but it better than no b read at all. And best of all I like it just fine and that’s what counts in the long run. Food should not be such a big deal. It should get your from point A to Point B with style and class not slathering butter on just cooked doughy yeasty hard on the digestion bread for me any more. I’m going to try going all almond flour as the coconut flour has so moisture and sweet ness that contributes to the heavy texture I think Of course the moisture is what makes it stick together too, Everything is a work in progress remember to use your processor to make crumbs out of the not so hot loaves. Breaded lemon dill tilapia anyone? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v7e4mP3p7eg
Hi Faith, I make a similar bread almost every day (from the Plant Paradox Cookbook), and it calls for full fat coconut milk…it works great as well. I will try your apple cider vinegar today, as the recipe I’ve been using calls for red wine vinegar. Thanks so much for posting, and thank you for the Arrowroot substitution…sometimes it can be a challenge to find! :-D
Hi, I just made these this morning. I substituted gelatin eggs for real eggs. I baked them on a cookie sheet—but next time I will put them on parchment paper because they did stick some. I also forgot the baking powder. I baked them for 20 mins. They were crunchy on the outside and gooey in the middle, but still delicious!! I also put them in the toaster after they came out of the oven. I would really love to come up with AIP recipe for these, because they are so darn good!! I probably could have gotten away with just one gelatin egg as well. I will have to experiment—-but if you come up with anything AIP in the future, please let us know! I love your blog!!

I found this recipe after buying Paleo Bread at Wholefoods. It was SO bad that it drove me to find a good recipe to make my own. When I read the review that it wasn’t too eggy, I was sold. I am not a huge fan of eggs (too bad for someone attempting a primal diet) so I was set to try this. I followed the directions exactly…even taking extra time to beat the eggs. I used the yoghurt instead of coconut cream. It came out perfect. Thank you for making something edible and still Paleo. I tried to give this recipe 5 stars but it’s having a glitch and won’t let me. 5 stars!!!

Jump up ^ Hou JK, Lee D, Lewis J (October 2014). "Diet and inflammatory bowel disease: review of patient-targeted recommendations". Clin. Gastroenterol. Hepatol. (Review). 12 (10): 1592–600. doi:10.1016/j.cgh.2013.09.063. PMC 4021001. PMID 24107394. Even less evidence exists for the efficacy of the SCD, FODMAP, or Paleo diets. Furthermore, the practicality of maintaining these interventions over long periods of time is doubtful.
This is the best gluten free bread recipe I’ve tried! So glad I found this. It’s not crumbly, very bread-like, just a bit dense. I loosely followed the recipe and changed a few things. I omitted the maple syrup to make it whole30. I didn’t have arrowroot so I subbed tapioca starch per some of the comments and added some chia seeds as well. Since there was so much coconut oil in it, I plan on experimenting and using olive oil so it doesn’t have too much of a coconut taste. My husband didn’t really notice it though. He is the gluten free one and he’s very picky about his bread, but this got his approval! I added some almonds on top and garlic and Italian herb seasoning to give it a flavor boost. I had trouble with this in the blender, maybe because I don’t have a very good one, so I will just use a mixing bowl next time. Thank you for sharing! I will be telling my friends about this!
The vinegar, when added last, gives the bread the rise. Often, Russian recipes call for baking soda and vinegar to give the rise (air pockets) you would normally get from yeast. I’m assuming, based on what I’ve read, that ACV has more health benefits, and a slightly different taste. I just took my bread out of the oven and it rose beautifully. Similar breads I’ve made called for less wet ingredients and were much denser. I can’t wait to cut this baby open and take a peek.

The first time that I tried to make a Paleo version of sandwich bread, I used sunflower seed butter. I used to really like the combination of honey and sunflower seeds in a loaf of bread, and since I had the sunflower seed butter on hand I used it instead of almond butter. I was very excited, the loaf turned out looking great…but then I set it out to cool. The loaf of bread slowly turned a vivid shade of green.


Almond flour is often considered the “all purpose” flour of the paleo baking world. It’s used to make things like bread, cakes, and cookies with good results. The only caveat I have is that using almond flour alone can result in a dense baked good, so I typically use almond flour (or almond meal) in conjunction with arrowroot starch, tapioca flour, and/or flaxseed meal to lighten up the texture.
Paleo baking is gluten free and grain free. Generally, paleo bread recipes have quite a few more ingredient options than low carb baking. Ingredients like tapioca flour and arrowroot flour are common in paleo baked goods, and help improve the texture greatly. The only thing is, these ingredients are relatively high in carbs and are typically avoided (or at least reduced) in low carb baking. This is why paleo baking can sometimes be a bit easier than low carb and/or keto baking.
1. Meat: It’s not always for dinner. Cooking meat transforms it: Roasting it or braising it for hours in liquid unlocks complex smells and flavors that are hard to resist. In addition to converting it into something we crave, intense heat also breaks down the meat into nutrients that we can more easily access. Our ancient ancestors likely loved the smell of meat on an open fire as much as we do.
I notice that you call for Celtic sea salt in your recipes – any particular reason why you call for that over other kinds of salt – i.e., regular table salt, kosher salt, or other types of sea salts? I ask because I don’t have this particular salt at home, but have others, and don’t want to ruin the recipe(s) if the measurement conversions are different for fine ground vs. coarse, for instance….
This was my first attempt at GF baking…and it turned out okay as in it’s not burnt and definately edible. I think I had glass pan issues…and I didn’t realize you had to melt the coconut oil since the recipe didn’t specify in liquid form vs soft solid…but my main comments is that it’s just too eggy. Like French toast eggy. Definately not what I’m looking for as a GF bread option to eat in the morning WITH EGGS. On to the next recipe.
Just made this bread this morning and it was wonderful! It will be a life saver since my 2 year old and husband are obsessed with bread. My only problem was that it came out very flat (only about an 1.5-2 inches thick). The only difference I could think of was that the only yogurt I had was plain whole milk, not greek. I was thinking about doubling the batch and cooking time to see if I get a thicker loaf. Any thoughts? It makes a good snack bread, but not sandwich bread since the slices are so small (they’d be finger sandwiches). Thanks again!!
I tried this recipe and it is not at all easy to incorporate 1/2 the egg whites in the food processor. When attempting to pulse just 2-3 times, only part of the egg whites incorporated, leaving 1/2 the whipped egg whites still sitting at the top of the mixture. I then had to use a spatula to force it down and pulsed 3 more times and ended up with a heavy batter because the egg whites completely fell. Then trying to fold the mixture into the rest of the egg whites was like trying to fold in cookie dough. The result was a loaf of baked eggs whites that had clumps of batter in the middle. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mwmPsvCuzvo
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