I’ve perused your bread recipe offerings (which I hadn’t really looked at previously since we mostly just opt-out of bread-type products) and am wondering which you would most recommend as a kid-pleaser to try in the challah mold. Additionally, I am wondering if you’ve ever played around with a potato-based bread option? I would prefer something that is not entirely flour based (including nut flours), if it is possible . . . https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aH5IqMjQm7U
Hi Gabriel, thank you! I think using bananas in this recipe will not work in place of the arrowroot. Although the bananas are also a starch, it will add moisture and affect the overall texture and taste. You could maybe substitute the yogurt for the bananas, but again the taste of your bread will be different. I have a few banana bread recipes on this blog. Do a search for banana bread to find them.
Autoimmunity is a process in which our bodies own immune system attacks “us.” Normally the immune system protects us from bacterial, viral, and parasitic infections. The immune system identifies a foreign invader, attacks it, and ideally clears the infection. A good analogy for autoimmunity is the case of tissue rejection after organ donation. If someone requires a new heart, lung kidney or liver due to disease or injury, a donor organ may be an option. The first step in this process is trying to find a tissue “match”. All of us have molecules in our tissues that our immune system uses to recognize self from non-self. If a donated organ is not close enough to the recipient in tissue type the immune system will attack and destroy the organ. In autoimmunity, a similar process occurs in that an individuals own tissue is confused as something foreign and the immune system attacks this “mislabeled” tissue. Common forms of autoimmunity include Multiple Sclerosis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Lupus, and Vitiligo to name only a tiny fraction of autoimmune diseases. Elements of autoimmunity are likely at play in conditions as seemingly unrelated as Schizophrenia, infertility, and various forms of cancer.
We Want to Live: The Primal Diet (2005 Expanded Edition) is a book by Aajonus Vonderplanitz. His basic philosophy is that (a) food is to be eaten in a live, raw condition; and (b) a diet rich in raw fats and raw meats from natural sources is essential to health. However his diet includes massive amounts of raw dairy. From the Planets is a book review by Ralph W. Moss. The Live-Food Mailing List discusses the concepts of this book.
And now we know that microbes, such as those in our gut, play a key role in our health, as well. The microbes we eat in foods like pickles may not take up a permanent home in our innards; rather, they seem to be more akin to transient visitors, says Pollan. Still, “fermented foods provide a lot of compounds that gut microbes like,” and he says he makes sure to eat some fermented vegetables every day. 
Another great recipe! So quick and so easy and so delicious! I used normal ground almonds, so the texture is more coarse and the bread turned out a darker than on Adriana’s pictures. I used coconut oil instead of butter and as I didn’t have enough arrowroodpowder at home I made half the amount and made muffins instead of a bread loaf. The baking time can be reduced to approx. 15 min. when making muffins.They turned out really fantastic, fluffy, moist and if you like the taste of coconut you should definitely make them with coconut oil instead of butter 🙂 I also love, that there’s no sugar involved! Thanks for sharing this recipe with us!

Whether you're living the paleo lifestyle or you're just looking for some new and fun recipes, these easy desserts are a great way to satisfy that sweet tooth. Not only are these treats considered paleo, but they're also fast, simple, and totally delicious. With chocolate recipes, be sure to pick a dark chocolate, the darker the better. And as a general guideline, stay away from granulated sugar and instead opt for natural sweetners like coconut sugar, agave, or raw honey, all of which are paleo-approved. 

As paleo guru Robb Wolf puts it, think of a 100-yard football field. The first 99.5 yards are how long Homo-Sapiens spent as hunter-gatherers. As they became REALLY good at hunting and gathering our bodies adapted to that lifestyle over thousands of years. That last half-yard represents our species after the agricultural revolution, where our diet has shifted (but our genetics haven’t).
— Toby Amidor, MS, RD, CDN, is founder of Toby Amidor Nutrition (http://tobyamidornutrition.com) and the author of the cookbooks The Greek Yogurt Kitchen: More Than 130 Delicious, Healthy Recipes for Every Meal of the Day and The Healthy Meal Prep Cookbook. She's a nutrition expert for FoodNetwork.com and a contributor to US News Eat + Run and MensFitness.com.
First things first. And this is of utmost importance. Woot Woot is STILL cool. Says me. Because I say it all the time, so it just HAS to be cool, right?! Wait, since I’m the most uncool person on the planet, you probably should stop saying woot woot immediately. 😉 Second, I had ZERO clue you used to be an almond butter-making maniac! Oh I wish I was your bestie during THAT fun phase of your life! Now you are just a no-bake brainiac! (<– see what I did there?). These bars are FAB, just like all the rest of your no-bake bars! They look super creamy and uber dreamy… and most dangerous, because who in the world could eat just one (or 5) of these babies?! SO GOOD! Pinned of course! Cheers, sweets! And haaaaappy Galentine's Day!! XOXOXOX
Hi, LOVE this bread!! So do my kids :) I have a problem though with the bread sticking in places to the bottom, so I tend to lose some of it..(handy quick desert though) Any suggestions as to how to keep the loaf intact? I have been using lard to liberally grease the bottom, Its still sticking. I have been waiting about 15 minutes before trying to remove it….should it be cold? Thanks A bunch!!
Fresh fruits and vegetables naturally contain between five and 10 times more potassium than sodium, and Stone Age bodies were well-adapted to this ratio. Potassium is necessary for the heart, kidneys, and other organs to work properly. Low potassium is associated with high blood pressure, heart disease, and stroke — the same problems linked to excessive dietary sodium. Today, the average American consumes about twice as much sodium as potassium! Following a Paleolithic diet helps to remedy this imbalance.
Another great recipe! So quick and so easy and so delicious! I used normal ground almonds, so the texture is more coarse and the bread turned out a darker than on Adriana’s pictures. I used coconut oil instead of butter and as I didn’t have enough arrowroodpowder at home I made half the amount and made muffins instead of a bread loaf. The baking time can be reduced to approx. 15 min. when making muffins.They turned out really fantastic, fluffy, moist and if you like the taste of coconut you should definitely make them with coconut oil instead of butter 🙂 I also love, that there’s no sugar involved! Thanks for sharing this recipe with us!
I added chia seeds to give the bread a bit of a healthy crunch, but also for the many nutritional benefits of these little wonders.  This a great low carb bread full of all my favourite low carb flours and so easy to make too.   You could add other flavours to this with herbs and spices and not be disappointed.  My next plan with this is to probably add some seeds to it.    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z0Iut8c-yJM

Baking with almond flour can sometimes be tricky and not all brands give you the same results. Actually, the one you cited is my least favorite and usually makes baked goods sink in the middle, get very dense and also crumbly. I highly suggest you use one of the brands of blanched almond flour I recommend. My favorites are by Honeyville, Welbee’s and Nuts(.com). Here’s Welbee’s on Amazon for $23 for 2 LB http://amzn.to/1M5cDzG
Hi Tessa, almond flour is actually very moist and doesn’t soak up much moisture. It can make baked goods oily and super moist sometimes. There are many brands that sell almond flour now, but not all work well or give you the same result when baking. The brands I found work best for baking are by Honeyville and Welbee’s. I also always use the blanched flour in my recipes. What brand did you use? I am happy you like my recipe. Please let me know how it goes when you try making it again and post a photo here so I can see.
The most common reason that any bread falls is that it needed to bake for longer. That being said, I’ll be perfectly honest – sometimes this keto bread recipe falls anyway, even despite doing everything else right. Fortunately this isn’t a huge deal because it still tastes delicious – IF you baked it for long enough and the center is cooked through. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WUvRMTnEC5M
Scott, Thanks so much for trying the bread, I’m sorry to hear the inside isn’t fully cooked for you. I wouldn’t cover the loaf while cooking, I would just leave the loaf in longer until fully cooked. Was the middle still uncooked, but the outside starting to burn? If that’s the case you might want to have your oven calibrated to make sure it’s accurate. Another thing you could try is reducing the temperature slightly (maybe by 25 degrees) and letting the loaf finish cooking at a lower temp so the outside doesn’t get too dark. I hope this helps!

Hi Tessa, almond flour is actually very moist and doesn’t soak up much moisture. It can make baked goods oily and super moist sometimes. There are many brands that sell almond flour now, but not all work well or give you the same result when baking. The brands I found work best for baking are by Honeyville and Welbee’s. I also always use the blanched flour in my recipes. What brand did you use? I am happy you like my recipe. Please let me know how it goes when you try making it again and post a photo here so I can see. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=maSjPJb4rbQ
These are AMAZING! I have celiac and was diagnosed about 4 months ago. It’s been very difficult and bread is what I miss most. Unfortunately, GF bread is not very tasty-i’ve tried a number of brands and have tried making my own. I love the simplicity of the recipe as well. Thank you for creating amazing clean recipes, your cookie bars are also fabulous!
Hi Becky! If you use the recommended size baking pan, the bread will be the proper height and you will be able to use it for sandwiches. If you use a pan that is bigger than the one I used, your bread won’t fill the pan up. Here’s an example –if you place 1/2 cup of water in a 1/2 measuring cup it will be 100% full to the top of the cup. If you put the same 1/2 cup of water in a 1 cup measuring cup it will only fill it 50% and will only be 1/2 full in height. That’s why a loaf pan that is too large doesn’t work for this recipe when it comes to the height of the loaf :-)
All content on elanaspantry.com is licensed and the original creation and property of elana's pantry (unless otherwise noted). You may use recipes from elanaspantry.com as long as their usage adheres to the following license criteria: (i) the recipe is to be credited to elanaspantry.com; such credit is to be linked back to the original recipe at http://www.elanaspantry.com/ (ii) you may not use any recipes for commercial purposes. Photos on elanaspantry.com may not be used.
Vitamin D is the one supplement that would be paleo. At least it would be for those of us that don't live outside year round. You can have your D level measured. The low RDAs only prevent definable deficiences, not problems that take a long time to develop. Michael Holick, MD is a leading writer on this subject. This is a 10 page PDF: Vitamin D: importance in the prevention of cancers, type 1 diabetes, heart disease, and osteoporosis and its companion Sunlight and vitamin D for bone health and prevention of autoimmune diseases, cancers, and cardiovascular disease [change PDF to 100% to read]. Or if you prefer, there is an hour video on YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OWjvq2GB0uc

Sometimes you don’t need a loaf of bread, and you just need enough for yourself to make a sandwich or to serve as a side to a hearty Paleo chili. This single serve recipe can easily be multiplied if needed, but it’s best when used as a one-serving bread when you don’t have the time, desire, or need for more than just enough for yourself. The way they’ve figure out how to make this Paleo friendly and ready to go in just a few minutes is impressive. It makes the perfect companion to all sorts of soups and stews, as the bookends to a sandwich, or as an accompaniment to eggs and bacon. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q3ywOo3iNoY


I made this tonight and used 1.5 cups almond flour, 1/2 cup tapioca starch, subbed chia meal for flax meal, subbed avocado oil for coconut oil, and added 1.5 T caraway seeds to give it a bit of a “rye bread taste”. We had it with corned beef tonight and it was very good. I did two mini loafs which took the same amount of cooking time. My husband and older son are usually very picky about paleo breads and they both gave it a thumbs up… I think because they both like the taste of caraway. Thanks for the recipe!

This was awesome. This is my second attempt at a no wheat bread. I did one before with coconut flour and it tasted like a salty cake. This is perfect. And I had to make few substitutions. Can’t wait to try the original recipe as I know it will taste even better. I had to substitute the flax meal and seeds with ground sesame and sesame seeds (no background on this, I made it up because I didn’t have flax seeds) and used olive oil instead of butter because I was too anxious to get it done and didn’t want to wait the melted butter to cool off. Even with this changes it browned perfectly, and it’s so fluffy!!! I’ll try toasting it to get a harder texture to be able to use it with toppings. Thank you very much for this recipe. 5 stars!!!
I know that soy can cause inflammation and if you are not using soy free eggs, that could be part of the cause. It may not be the actual egg but the soy that is the problem. just a thought. Here is an article that has some interesting info on soy. http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/07/29/soy-effects-on-women.aspx?e_cid=20120729_SNL_Art_1
Hi I am new to the grain free diet and I love this bread. Has anyone figured out the calorie count for it? I have been gluten free since 2003 and it has served me well, although I think that I could benefit from grain free. But like all diet changes that I have tried in the past I tend to gain weight if I do not know the calorie count of the new recipes. Thanks.
A decade ago, when I was on the low-fat craze, I’d make fluffy cakes using no butter/fat, replacing it with apple sauce, which gives moisture and a soft texture. These days, I’m a low-carb girl, but a 1/4 cup of apple sauce divided by 4 = only 1 tablespoon (per roll/per 2nd day). I’m okay with that, especially because I substitute half the tapioca flour (high-carb) for whey protein powder to cut a few carbs that way. 🙂
Jump up ^ Hou JK, Lee D, Lewis J (October 2014). "Diet and inflammatory bowel disease: review of patient-targeted recommendations". Clin. Gastroenterol. Hepatol. (Review). 12 (10): 1592–600. doi:10.1016/j.cgh.2013.09.063. PMC 4021001. PMID 24107394. Even less evidence exists for the efficacy of the SCD, FODMAP, or Paleo diets. Furthermore, the practicality of maintaining these interventions over long periods of time is doubtful.
For example, although white potatoes were recorded as being available during the Paleolithic era, they are usually avoided on the Paleo diet because of their high glycemic index. Processed foods are also technically off limits due to an emphasis on fresh foods, but some Paleo diets allow frozen fruits and vegetables because the freezing process preserves most nutrients.

The Stone Age Diet: Based on in-depth studies of human ecology and the diet of man by Walter L. Voegtlin. This was self-published back in 1975. Only a couple hundred copies were printed and distributed to friends and relatives. No one knew the book existed until some years later. In no way is he the father of the paleo diet. It is impossible to purchase. Apparently his descendents are planning a reprint, though the book is poorly written and not based upon factual anthropological information that even was available then. We have put up his Functional and Structural Comparison of Man's Digestive Tract with that of a Dog and Sheep. And a PDF can be found here. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PKF5zGzOkyo


Anna are you saying even though you omitted the almond butter and just made the bread with the rest of the ingredients it was exactly as if the almond butte was in the recipe. Was there any difference at all like holding together as well, or maybe it did not rise as much, etc. Can you please explain what was different and which was was better in taste and texture and rising, etc. Thanks https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BlKj2aWp0F4

Eat low to moderate amounts of fruits and nuts. Try to eat mostly fruits low in sugar and high in antioxidants like berries as well as nuts high in omega-3, low in omega-6 and low in total polyunsaturated fat like macadamia nuts. Consider cutting off fruits and nuts altogether if you have an autoimmune disease, digestive problems or are trying to lose weight faster.
I didn’t have almond flour so substituted 1 cup millet flour and 1 cup sorghum flour for the almond flour, and baked in an 7.5″ x 4.5″ x 2.5″ loaf pan. The loaf was short, about 1.5″ tall, the texture was pleasantly dense and held together well. The taste, however, was pasty (like flour) and the bread was dry. (I noticed afterwards that the sorghum flour package said to substitute 15-20% sorghum flour in your recipe, so that may have affected the taste and dryness.) I tried a slice with a topping of honey, and that was pretty good, but not good enough. So I made croutons, which were delicious. I cut the bread into small cubes and spread them on a cookie sheet, sprayed them with olive oil spray and drizzled 1/2 stick of butter over them, then seasoned generously with Nature’s Seasonings and garlic powder (for a richer crouton, could also sprinkle with parmesan cheese). I tossed them to distribute the seasonings and baked them at 350 degrees about 20 minutes until crunchy. I’ll try the recipe again when I have almond flour. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jQDpobq7jYY&t=91s
×