Eat generous amounts of saturated fats like coconut oil and butter or clarified butter. Beef tallow, lard and duck fat are also good, but only if they come from healthy and well-treated animals. Beef or lamb tallow is a better choice than lamb or duck fat. Olive, avocado and macadamia oil are also good fats to use in salads and to drizzle over food, but not for cooking. For more information, have a look at our beginner’s guide to Paleo and fat.

As I type I have my first loaf of Paleo Bread in the oven. I live in South Africa where we apparently don’t have any flax meal…so I imported some from your side of the world and can’t wait to taste the results. My daughter, who suffers with severe juvenile arthritis and for whom we all made the conversion to Paleo, and I made it together and experimented with your silver dollar pancakes for fun at the same time. Those were delicious and enjoyed with blueberries and a bit of honey.
Autoimmunity is a process in which our bodies own immune system attacks “us.” Normally the immune system protects us from bacterial, viral, and parasitic infections. The immune system identifies a foreign invader, attacks it, and ideally clears the infection. A good analogy for autoimmunity is the case of tissue rejection after organ donation. If someone requires a new heart, lung kidney or liver due to disease or injury, a donor organ may be an option. The first step in this process is trying to find a tissue “match”. All of us have molecules in our tissues that our immune system uses to recognize self from non-self. If a donated organ is not close enough to the recipient in tissue type the immune system will attack and destroy the organ. In autoimmunity, a similar process occurs in that an individuals own tissue is confused as something foreign and the immune system attacks this “mislabeled” tissue. Common forms of autoimmunity include Multiple Sclerosis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Lupus, and Vitiligo to name only a tiny fraction of autoimmune diseases. Elements of autoimmunity are likely at play in conditions as seemingly unrelated as Schizophrenia, infertility, and various forms of cancer.
Paleo Bread™ was inspired by the Paleolithic diet due to it’s health and dietary benefits.  Those who follow the Paleo lifestyle cut out all grains and eat what our native hunters and gatherers ate many years ago.  It’s a food plan based on lean meats, seafood, nuts, fruits, and fresh vegetables.  We created two versions of Paleo Bread which meet any and all requirements in order to be kind to practically any diet.  Both breads are healthy, low calorie, gluten free and grain free.  The Almond variety and the Coconut variety are equally tasty and both offer their own unique benefits.
Hi, Elana. Just wanted to let you know that I love this bread recipe. I make it all the time. Not long ago, I had an epic fail because I forgot to let my ingredients come to room temperature. I had quite an issue with tunneling. The bread was unusable for slicing, but I decided to cube it and dry it in the oven so I’d have some gluten-free bread for stuffing. I used it to convert my treasured cornbread stuffing recipe to a gluten-free version, and it turned out great. My recipe will be featured on my blog(www.gardenforestfield.com), with a link to your bread recipe, on Monday, Nov. 18th. Thanks for all you do.

Food and Western Disease: Health and nutrition from an evolutionary perspective by Staffan Lindeberg (MD at Lund University in Sweden) is the newest book promoting the paleo diet. It covers the link between diet and disease in the Western world (all major diseases, including cancer, heart disease, obesity, stroke and dementia) and towards a greater knowledge of what can be defined as the optimal human diet. Benefits and risks are detailed. The Amazon reviews are all 5 stars. Especially read Susan Schenck's detailed review. You can read a preview at Google Books https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BMOjVYgYaG8
Another great recipe! So quick and so easy and so delicious! I used normal ground almonds, so the texture is more coarse and the bread turned out a darker than on Adriana’s pictures. I used coconut oil instead of butter and as I didn’t have enough arrowroodpowder at home I made half the amount and made muffins instead of a bread loaf. The baking time can be reduced to approx. 15 min. when making muffins.They turned out really fantastic, fluffy, moist and if you like the taste of coconut you should definitely make them with coconut oil instead of butter 🙂 I also love, that there’s no sugar involved! Thanks for sharing this recipe with us!
Paleonutrition by Mark Q. Sutton, Kristin D. Sobolik, and Jill K. Gardner is the analysis of prehistoric human diets and the interpretation of dietary intake in relation to health and nutrition. This is a substantial text that combines background to paleonutrition, an extensive bibliography, a discussion on methods, and case studies. Published February 23, 2010.
wow, I have tried to make a good gluten free bread for about a year and this tops all of the recipes I’ve tried. I have to agree with the comment that most gluten-free/grain-free breads are eggy … this one is not and it tastes great. I just enjoyed a piece with boursin tomato pesto. Thank you for the great recipe. I will be trying many more of your recipes.
I am a complete fan of yours and have been trying various recipes over the years that have loved by my family! I tried making this bread today. It was cooked all the way through but looked rather pale. I wanted to put it back in the oven a little longer but feared that this plan would make things way to dry. Any thoughts with what I can do differently next time? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T-u8kW-OlqQ
I am so happy that I found your site! I have been trying for a couple years to find a good bread/roll recipe (I’m kind of picky) and this is the first one that I have absolutely loved. My kids love them too. I am going to order the molds you use but for now am making them in a muffin pan and they turn out great. So far I’ve used them with tuna salad and your sloppy joe recipe (which is also delicious! ) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WT3-ea4BwiE
For example, although white potatoes were recorded as being available during the Paleolithic era, they are usually avoided on the Paleo diet because of their high glycemic index. Processed foods are also technically off limits due to an emphasis on fresh foods, but some Paleo diets allow frozen fruits and vegetables because the freezing process preserves most nutrients.
this looks amazing! i am low carb, so this will work for me as opposed to some of your other gluten free breads! i cant have arrowroot powder and other similar ingredients. that being said, i love ALL your recipes and even if they contain ingredients i cant have, they are usually easy to substitute or ‘play’ around with until i get it low carb friendly;) thankfully, you have done the work for me here;)thanks!!!!!
You’ll stay pretty full on the Paleo diet. Nutrition experts emphasize the importance of satiety, the satisfied feeling that you’ve had enough. You shouldn’t feel hungry on this diet – protein and fiber are filling, and you’ll get plenty of both. One small study of 29 participants published in Nutrition & Metabolism in 2010 found Paleo dieters felt just as full but consumed fewer calories than their Mediterranean counterparts.
Gabbi Berkow, MA, RD, CDN, CPT, is a Paleo advocate. She maintains the whole, unprocessed foods the diet recommends are low in calories, are high in nutrients, provide the fuel the body needs, and are the kinds of foods humans have evolved to easily digest. However, she doesn't agree with the blanket recommendations that everyone needs to eliminate dairy, grains (in particular, those containing gluten), and legumes, unless they have a medical condition that warrants it (eg, celiac disease or dairy allergy). In addition, Berkow says, "Dairy in particular is a good source of protein, calcium, and vitamin D, so cutting out dairy can make it harder to get enough of these nutrients." https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E-TDu1F0ZTA

Chris Masterjohn has Cholesterol: Your Life Depends on It!, another web site pointing out that the war on cholesterol and the push to put people on statins is misguided. The site argues it is actually polyunsaturated fats, not saturated fats or cholesterol, that contribute to heart disease, cancer, liver damage, and aging. He also has a popular blog.

Hi! I made this bread today and the taste is amazing! The only problem with mine is that it didn’t rise even a little. Yours looks lighter, light not dense. Mine was very dense and even though I cooked it longer still darker and not quite cooked enough in the inside (but the outside was very done). The only thing I did different was I used Brown flax meal and 3 duck eggs because they’re bigger than chicken eggs. The taste was amazing so I would think if I could get it too rise a bit and not be so dense it would be perfect! Do you think adding an extra egg would help out maybe just a egg white since duck have a bit more yolk? Thank you for this recipe! I’m going to try again soon!
Our family LOVES your paleo bread recipe (among others–like the muffins, cupcakes, cookies…) I’m wondering if have any plans to work on a Paleo Tortilla?? Mark’s Daily Apple posted one–I’ve made it a couple of times–changing the recipe a bit–but have not figured out a way to keep the tortilla from falling apart once you fill it. Any suggestions or tips would be GREATLY appreciated.
Proponents of the Paleo diet follow a nutritional plan based on the eating habits of our ancestors in the Paleolithic period, between 2.5 million and 10,000 years ago. Before agriculture and industry, humans presumably lived as hunter–gatherers: picking berry after berry off of bushes; digging up tumescent tubers; chasing mammals to the point of exhaustion; scavenging meat, fat and organs from animals that larger predators had killed; and eventually learning to fish with lines and hooks and hunt with spears, nets, bows and arrows.
Healthy, delicious, and simple, the Paleo Diet is the diet you were designed to eat. If you want to lose weight—up to seventy-five pounds in six months—or if you want to attain optimal health, The Paleo Diet will change your life now. Dr. Loren Cordain, the world's leading expert on Paleolithic nutrition, demonstrates how by eating all the lean meats and fish, fresh fruits, and nonstarchy vegetables you want, you can lose weight and prevent and treat heart disease, cancer, osteoporosis, metabolic syndrome, and many other illnesses. Incorporating all the latest breakthroughs in Paleo nutrition research, this new edition of the bestselling The Paleo Diet includes six weeks of meal plans to get you started on the Paleo path to weight loss, weight control, increased energy, and lifelong health.

I am a complete fan of yours and have been trying various recipes over the years that have loved by my family! I tried making this bread today. It was cooked all the way through but looked rather pale. I wanted to put it back in the oven a little longer but feared that this plan would make things way to dry. Any thoughts with what I can do differently next time?


I cannot adequately share my enthusiasm for this bread. I’m not much of a bread maker so the tips were very helpful. I went through the effort to get the recommended ingredients and the cost was well worth it. I’ll be making several loaves. I’ve only recently switched to a keto diet and have been disappointed over and over again when I try new recipes as replacements for my favorites. THIS WAS THE FIRST SUCCESS!! Tastes great. I dont question that its bread, no tricking myself to like it. Thank you so much! I can’t wait to try more of your recipes!


Thank you so much for this recipe! I’ve made it several times and I love it for myself. I have tried many versions: coconut oil, ghee, butter, coconut cream, refrigerated coconut milk from a can, shaken (after a couple of days in the fridge) and full fat yogurt. I always beat my eggs for 2-3 minutes (by hand) until very frothy before adding the wet ingredients then beat them again after incorporating wet ingredients to get them thick. Although I like them all, I have had the best results for rising (and actual ‘bread-like’ texture and loft) from coconut oil and yogurt. My husband eats gluten-free but not paleo so when his favourite GF bread was out at the store he was stuck (he’s a ‘must eat sandwich for lunch’ guy and we’ve tried all the GF varieties in our store, some of them complete rocks!). I offered to make him a loaf and he accepted (he’s had this loaf before but felt it’s texture was more like a banana bread or zucchini bread than sandwich material). I got rave reviews from him today about the bread for his sandwich (made with coconut oil and yogurt). Total convert!!
The most common reason that any bread falls is that it needed to bake for longer. That being said, I’ll be perfectly honest – sometimes this keto bread recipe falls anyway, even despite doing everything else right. Fortunately this isn’t a huge deal because it still tastes delicious – IF you baked it for long enough and the center is cooked through.
I made it today. Didn’t have applesauce so I tried apricot puree. Not sure what the batter should look like mine was thick so added juice from the stewed apricots had to add water so that it resembled batter. Didn’t have the round pans so I used little loaf pans took longer to bake. End result bread chewy not fluffy doesn’t taste bad but definitely not what the picture shows. Will have to remember the applesauce next time. ? Does the batter resemble pancake batter or a quick bread batter https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A-VRe3Xkvzo

Tonight, I tried using this differently…I coated all natural hot dogs with it and made “corn dogs”. I was able to cover 7 easily with a full recipe, minus 1 egg so it would be stiffer dough, and laid them on a Silpat covered cookie sheet. I started at 400 degrees to make sure they browned, but I ended up turning it down to 350 for about 25 minutes. They were great. Thanks again for the recipe and hard work.
I’m so glad you love it, Tanya! Yes, $17 sounds like a lot for xanthan gum. I use this one here. Swerve is sweeter than erythritol, so you’d need less of it – I have a conversion chart here. You’re absolutely right about the xanthan gum and texture – it will make the bread more chewy. It will still be more of a “light and fluffy” bread, but definitely less muffin-like with the xanthan gum. I haven’t tried add-ins yet – let me know how it goes if you try!
I just made a loaf of this last night. I followed the recipe to a T since it was the first time making. It has a very nice flavor but I would not regard it as an ideal sandwich bread. It has the texture of a light banana bread and even using a smaller loaf pan it made a tiny loaf, didn’t rise much. This is a good bread for toast but it is drier on the ends of the loaf and crumbles easily. I think if I were to make again I might use 1 and 1/2 the quantities listed and I would only bake for 30 minutes.
In Defense of Food: An Eater's Manifesto by Michael Pollan gives a guided tour of 20th century food science, a history of "nutritionism" in America and a look at the marriage of government and the food industry. Then the book presents a commonsense shopping-and-eating guide, which like the paleo diet focuses on shopping the perimeter of the supermarket. He also now has a much shorter Food Rules: An Eater's Manual.
I’m excited to hear that! If I have a chance to do any recipe testing myself, I will let you know if I come up with anything worthwhile . . .Staying tuned and looking forward to it! Is there any way for me to be notified of your replies to my comment(s)? I had to come back to this page to see this, so just wondering (and I do have the box clicked about “notify me of follow-up comments by email”). Thanks again!
In Defense of Food: An Eater's Manifesto by Michael Pollan gives a guided tour of 20th century food science, a history of "nutritionism" in America and a look at the marriage of government and the food industry. Then the book presents a commonsense shopping-and-eating guide, which like the paleo diet focuses on shopping the perimeter of the supermarket. He also now has a much shorter Food Rules: An Eater's Manual. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kyiH1xtmN_w
Michele, this is the most delicious bread and can’t believe it’s paleo. So easy to make and keep. After a few days of keeping it out, I cut the rest into slices, put slice sized parchment paper between each one and freeze. I save the parchment for future loaves. Getting ready to make another one. It’s so delicious! Thank you for all your attempts to perfect it. YUM!!
The Paleo diet not only misunderstands how our own species, the organisms inside our bodies and the animals and plants we eat have evolved over the last 10,000 years, it also ignores much of the evidence about our ancestors' health during their—often brief—individual life spans (even if a minority of our Paleo ancestors made it into their 40s or beyond, many children likely died before age 15). In contrast to Grok, neither Paleo hunter–gatherers nor our more recent predecessors were sculpted Adonises immune to all disease. A recent study in The Lancet looked for signs of atherosclerosis—arteries clogged with cholesterol and fats—in more than one hundred ancient mummies from societies of farmers, foragers and hunter–gatherers around the world, including Egypt, Peru, the southwestern U.S and the Aleutian Islands. "A common assumption is that atherosclerosis is predominately lifestyle-related, and that if modern human beings could emulate preindustrial or even preagricultural lifestyles, that atherosclerosis, or least its clinical manifestations, would be avoided," the researchers wrote. But they found evidence of probable or definite atherosclerosis in 47 of 137 mummies from each of the different geographical regions. And even if heart disease, cancer, obesity and diabetes were not as common among our predecessors, they still faced numerous threats to their health that modern sanitation and medicine have rendered negligible for people in industrialized nations, such as infestations of parasites and certain lethal bacterial and viral infections.
I didn’t have almond flour so substituted 1 cup millet flour and 1 cup sorghum flour for the almond flour, and baked in an 7.5″ x 4.5″ x 2.5″ loaf pan. The loaf was short, about 1.5″ tall, the texture was pleasantly dense and held together well. The taste, however, was pasty (like flour) and the bread was dry. (I noticed afterwards that the sorghum flour package said to substitute 15-20% sorghum flour in your recipe, so that may have affected the taste and dryness.) I tried a slice with a topping of honey, and that was pretty good, but not good enough. So I made croutons, which were delicious. I cut the bread into small cubes and spread them on a cookie sheet, sprayed them with olive oil spray and drizzled 1/2 stick of butter over them, then seasoned generously with Nature’s Seasonings and garlic powder (for a richer crouton, could also sprinkle with parmesan cheese). I tossed them to distribute the seasonings and baked them at 350 degrees about 20 minutes until crunchy. I’ll try the recipe again when I have almond flour.
I made the amended version of this yesterday (in the Parrish pan) and it turned out great. I have an oven thermometer that confirmed the 350-degree oven temperature, but the bread took another ten minutes (40 altogether) in the oven before it toothpick-tested done. Testing for doneness this way is nothing more than I would expect of any kind of baking. The bread tastes wonderful. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=REgtM8mvAsY
The first time that I tried to make a Paleo version of sandwich bread, I used sunflower seed butter. I used to really like the combination of honey and sunflower seeds in a loaf of bread, and since I had the sunflower seed butter on hand I used it instead of almond butter. I was very excited, the loaf turned out looking great…but then I set it out to cool. The loaf of bread slowly turned a vivid shade of green.
Is there any place to get organic almond flour–and please don’t talk about Bob’s Red Mills. Most of their products are NOT organic and that includes their almond flour. I am pretty disciplined about not using chemically grown food. Also, since most American almonds come from California there is the added concern about whether they are watered with waste water from oil companies.
This came out better than I expected it to actually. I did not have coconut flour so I added an extra 1/4c of almond meal. It was a tad bland but other than that a nice bread. I think the coconut flour would add to its flavor and sweetness. I will try again and add a banana just to give it a little more flavor. the pan I used was a regular loaf pan and it was a bit thin but otherwise a nice bread. My daughter enjoyed with peanutbutter and banana mashed together and I had it with her egg salad.

Made this bread the other night and it is so wonderful!!.Love it slightly warmed with a pat of butter.My only problem is that it did not rise that much so can’t really use for a sandwich.My eggs were not fresh nor my refrigerated flaxseed meal..I used a glass loaf pan (buttered).I did cook at 350 degrees for the 30 min and it came out wonderful!!Thanks so much for the recipe.I love the recipes with honey and/or stevia, sucanat or rapadura. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RRCgH9ZQj2o
Bought this probably about a year ago or so... Finally decide to try it. WOW!!! It's been 18 days and I've lost over 16 pounds, and I've been eating all I want, and am never going hungry, so I have no cravings for anything, fresh home-made Italian bread or even my all-time favorite corn-type snacks, especially popcorn. Tried some hi carb, processed foods after the first week... felt like crap and lost my desire to eat them. I assume I will plateau one of these days and will have to start exercising, but right now I have a sedentary lifestyle with my job and additional personal activities.
And the one thing to keep in mind is that your bread will likely fall slightly post bake. Blame it on the lack of starch (keto flours are notoriously heavy and moist) and certain missing proteins (think gluten). Just keep in mind that we’re baking at ridiculously high altitude here, so if our loaf was still nearly double it’s volume after cooling- odds are yours will be even better!
It’s so hard to find good nut-free recipes when you’re on a paleo diet. So I created this Nut-Free Flax Bread for those of you with allergies. This is another easy recipe that is made in a standard size loaf pan. Fans say they like it so much that they have to try not to snack on it all day. They’re also saying it’s an amazing bread that everyone can eat since it’s nut-free, and that it’s perfect for those with both gluten and nut allergies!
Hahaha. That’s why we’re besties. We staunchly refuse to follow the times. ???? Now what’s this all about floral curtains? Do you have a set picked out for me? Lolol. I’ve never tried Justin’s vanilla AB. But now I’m super intrigued! Yes on the overheating–AB takes a lot longer than you would think. I will label at least 100 of these cookies for you. 😉 Love ya more! <3 <3 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FHhthf8B-xk
I used the right sized pan after reading further into the blog it was the almond flour I used it was almond meal/flour. I went to one of your preferred sites and ordered flour from there. I am new to this type of baking so I am learning as I go. Do you have the nutritional breakdown of this bread printed somewhere? I am not seeing it on the recipe.
Another possibility is that maybe your oven is not well calibrater (which is normal) and your bread needed to cook longer. I suggest next time you insert the stick in a few areas to ensure it’s done throughout. Also, it’s a good idea to purchase an oven thermometer to ensure the temperature is where you want it during baking. They cost less that $20, I got mine for less than $10.

If you have more questions on specific foods, we’ve included a comprehensive list of paleo diet foods below. We’ve provided a list of the foods that are allowed on the paleo diet. We’ve also broken this list down into the specific food groups, so you can see which meats, vegetables, fruits, nuts, and fats are on the paleo diet. In addition to all of that, we’ve also included a comprehensive list of foods not allowed on the paleo diet.
Thank you so much for this recipe. I’ve made this recipe and your simple bread recipe and both came out perfect right from the start. I did follow the recipes EXACTLY, except for the fact that I don’t have a food processor so I had to “pulse” by hand which led me to believe that I had to stir in ingredients in large minimal swoops being careful not to over mix. Wondering if that is what other people had done when they’ve made this recipe without a food processor? As I said, it came out perfectly. just wondering if I was just lucky.
Hi there, it’s Lacey! I’m the editor and main writer for A Sweet Pea Chef. I'm a food blogger, health and food coach, professional photographer, and mommy of three. I also run the awesome free Take Back Your Health Community, am the healthy and clean weekly meal planner behind No-Fail Meals, and a little bit in love with Clean Eating. Be sure to check out my free beginner’s guide to eating clean and follow me on YouTube and Instagram to get my latest recipes and healthy eating inspiration. Read More… https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WbZaUqW_zBc
Many of you asked if you could make them with almond butter. So here we are, settling it once and for all. Why, yes, you can make them with almond butter. Woot woot!! Btw, please tell me that people still say “woot woot.” As usual, I’m like 1 full decade late to the slang game. Shall I remind you of my use of “cray?” I’ve totally got to start calling things “lit” too before that goes out. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IoepvUQlRzo

OMG! I cannot believe how good that bread looks!!! I made the gluten-free transition a year ago and came up with some great flatbreads I was perfectly happy with using rice or chicpeas. Then..I went Paleo (not quite 2 months ago) and I figured well that’s it for bread then. Until now. I cannot get over how fantastic this looks and I cannot wait to try it!! 🙂

I added chia seeds to give the bread a bit of a healthy crunch, but also for the many nutritional benefits of these little wonders.  This a great low carb bread full of all my favourite low carb flours and so easy to make too.   You could add other flavours to this with herbs and spices and not be disappointed.  My next plan with this is to probably add some seeds to it.    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6JMPLMKoDMA


Life Without Bread: How a Low-Carbohydrate Diet Can Save Your Life by Christian B. Allan, Wolfgang Lutz. It is based on Dr. Lutz's work with thousands of patients in Austria. It deals with the health issues connected to high carb consumption. It is basically an English version and update of Dr. Lutz's 1967 book with the same title: Leben ohne Brot. He recommends eating only 72 grams of carbohydrates, and an unlimited amount of fat. And provides evidence as to why this is the healthiest diet. Read the review at Amazon by Todd Moody (it will be first!). See excerpts from his earlier edition: Dismantling a Myth: The Role of Fat and Carbohydrates in our Diet

While there is wide variability in the way the paleo diet is interpreted,[6] the diet typically includes vegetables, fruits, nuts, roots, and meat and typically excludes foods such as dairy products, grains, sugar, legumes, processed oils, salt, alcohol or coffee.[1][additional citation(s) needed] The diet is based on avoiding not just processed foods, but rather the foods that humans began eating after the Neolithic Revolution when humans transitioned from hunter-gatherer lifestyles to settled agriculture.[3] The ideas behind the diet can be traced to Walter Voegtlin,[7]:41 and were popularized in the best-selling books of Loren Cordain.[8]
With a very simple shift we not only remove the foods that are at odds with our health (grains, legumes, and dairy) but we also increase our intake of vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. Here is a great paper from Professor Loren Cordain exploring how to build a modern Paleo diet: The nutritional characteristics of a contemporary diet based upon Paleolithic food groups. This paper also offers significant insight as to the amounts and ratios of protein, carbohydrate and fat in the ancestral diet.
I forgot to say I used half al one flour and half sunflower seed flour.. I double the batch and I found if I let it sit for about 25 min, then put it in the oven it gets thicker as it sits and I still have to bake it for an hour. The tast is great. The next time I’m buying Honeyville flour and making it exactly like your recipe says. I’m just worried about mixing it to much. Mine is very dense and heavy. But yummy.
I have made this now about 10 times. The first time I made them too thin. I use two muffin top pans (6 wells in each) and I filled 8 the first time. Then I went to six and it was perfect. My grandson is so happy we have bread again. Everyone loves it slathered in kerrygold butter. I make a double batch to get 12 pieces. I also make a single batch with garlic, extra salt and Parmesan cheese in the batter. I sprinkled some cheese on top of the batter before baking. The garlic bread was so delicious! Thanks for a super simple delicious recipe that I can make in five minutes.
I followed this recipe meticulously…but this “bread” is nothing like sandwich bread. Extremely dense and super fatty (greasy) and my son can’t pick it up without it falling apart for a school lunch (Exactly what I wanted it for). I used the coconut cream instead of yogurt and homemade almond flour which was super fine from a quick final mix in the Vitamix. I’ll use it up with Jelly but I couldn’t imagine adding more fat to it like butter or almond butter…it already qualifies as a paper weight LOL.
I don’t have dietary issues and do not adhere to a strict paleo diet. I do, however, have a raging sweet tooth that I try to keep in check by eating a low glycemic diet day to day, and limit high glycemic foods to those times when I am deliberately treating myself to “sweets”. This bread is more the texture of “quick bread” (like banana, or zucchini), which was a surprise. Its very tasty and satisfying, almost rich. This bread will be a good delivery system for peanut butter and bananas or soft boiled eggs.
Our hefty cousins, the apes, spend half their waking hours gnawing on raw sustenance, about six hours per day. In contrast, we spend only one hour. “So in a sense, cooking opens up this space for other activities,” says Pollan. “It’s very hard to have culture, it’s very hard to have science, it’s very hard to have all the things we count as important parts of civilization if you’re spending half of all your waking hours chewing.” Cooked food: It gave us civilization.
OMG…Could your FABULOUS coconut palm syrup/recipe be used/considered as the ultra-expensive COCONUT NECTAR?..If so…this is sheer BRILLIANCE as it has provided a needed “Eureka” moment for me in my quest for a low glycemic substitute for agave or honey..Is the resulting syrup suitable for use in this fashion in baking?…Thank you so much for contributing your wonderful idea.
re almond flour & coconut oil, any health food store staff would be super helpful in pointing you to the right ones, especially when you tell them you’ll baking. he showed me unbleached almond flour and coconut flour (Bob’s Red Mill is all over NYC, at least, and you can get it online http://www.amazon.com/Bobs-Red-Mill-Organic-16-Ounce/dp/B000KENKZ8/ref=sr_1_4?s=grocery&ie=UTF8&qid=1383057846&sr=1-4&keywords=bob%27s+red+mill+coconut their products are consistently great, IMHO) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ery6ez2M7aw
1. Meat: It’s not always for dinner. Cooking meat transforms it: Roasting it or braising it for hours in liquid unlocks complex smells and flavors that are hard to resist. In addition to converting it into something we crave, intense heat also breaks down the meat into nutrients that we can more easily access. Our ancient ancestors likely loved the smell of meat on an open fire as much as we do. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RJRUoKMg1MQ
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