So, it’s my LAST DAY of the Whole30 (and perhaps yours, too!) the last day of January, and it’s time to welcome some Paleo treats back into my life.  And yours, of course.   It’s almost Valentines Day, right?!  And – maybe it’s just me – but I can’t do Valentines Day without my fair share of chocolate.   Luckily there are so many easy, deliciously indulgent chocolate recipes that taste classically rich but are made without any unhealthy ingredients. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B0CG_84_7s8

Introduction         Unless you are involved in the culinary arts or the meat industry, you probably haven’t given much thought to the term, “Saint Louis Style Pork Ribs”.   Is this dish some kind of specially spiced, spare rib recipe from St. Louis, MO?  Did it originate in a colorful Saint Louis, 20th century restaurant, or maybe it was first served at a St. Louis Cardinal baseball game in the 1930s?   All three hypotheses...
"Every fad diet thinks it has discovered the root of all evil," says Dr. Ochner. But nutrients in legumes, whole grains, and dairy—all of which are forbidden on the paleo diet—can help to lower the risk of osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease, reduce blood pressure, and promote a healthy weight, he says. Cutting dairy, the primary source of calcium and vitamin D in modern diets, is especially worrisome for women who want to avoid osteoporosis.
We made the mix as directed. We then mixed 1/2 cup coconut sugar and 1 Tablespoon cinnamon in a separate container. Pour 1/2 of the bread mix in the pan, followed by 1/2 of the cinnamon/sugar mix. Then put the rest of the bread mix in the pan and cover with the rest of the cinnamon/sugar mix. Then swirl with a knife. Great bread for having with stew or soup!
Made it last night and my husband & I ate the whole loaf! I used olive oil instead of palm oil, and I used arrowroot instead of tapioca flour. Also, I baked for 22min in a mini-loaf pan and let it cool for 15-20min before slicing. I got 8 small slices and they were delicious! Very fluffy and raised nicely during baking. The texture was extremely fluffy and just like any sandwich roll as you’d expect. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kx6fTrGb6hA
I am excited about this recipe for Paleo Sandwich Bread because even though it is completely grain and gluten free, it tastes amazing and the consistency is moist and soft just like the sandwich breads we were used to before changing our diet. In my opinion though, there is also a tiny hint of sweetness to it and this is due to the almond flour being sweeter than grain wheat flour.

This is such an excellent versatile recipe and definitely my favorite gluten-free bread recipe. I find that I’m perfectly satisfied using almond meal that of almond flour. And it has adapted well to any other kind of nut or seed meal I have tried so far. Last week I used all pecan meal is my favorite today taste wise. I also often mix half of another nut meal with half almond meal. Second favorite was half almond meal with half sunflower seed meal the taste was delicious. However the sunflower seed meal did turn green like I did read. . . Morning I may Kallof with all walnut meal and I’m sure it will turn out cause of all the work you did in creating this recipe. Also I never use a food processor I mix it all by hand and it still turns out.
It appears that there are many gluten free baking powders out there, so I’m not sure if there’s some reason for avoiding baking powder. But baking soda is four times as powerful as baking powder. (In fact, a teaspoon of baking powder contains 1/4 tsp of baking soda, 1/2 tsp of acids, and 1/4 tsp of filler.) So this recipe calling for 1.5 tsp of baking soda is like putting two TABLESPOONS of baking powder into this little tiny loaf, which is a crazy amount. Using 1.5 tsp of baking POWDER is much more reasonable, and that’s 3/8 tsp of baking soda. Note also that the tablespoond of vinegar is about sufficient to neutralize 1/2 tsp of the baking soda, so my substitution should give about the same actual leavening power as the original recipe. (Another way to make this recipe better would be to just reduce the baking soda so that the amount used is completely neutralized.)
Often Keto and Paleo recipes get grouped together which is how I found you…I am on Keto though, and the tapioca flour and applesauce bring the carb amounts up too high. Do you have a low carb alternative for these ingredients? Is there a way to sub coconut flour for the tapioca by adjusting the ratios of the coconut flour to liquid. I may be able to get by using the applesauce (I think that will be ok if no more than 1/4 c,) but would still need a compensating liquid. Any suggestions? I so want this to be my answer to a long search for a decent bread substitute.
I’ve been thinking about bringing paleo-friendly bread and rolls to LCK for some time now. But I knew before I did that I needed to make sure they fit specific criteria. They need the right flavor and fluffy, soft, air-y, bread-like texture. You see, I’ve never bothered buying gluten-free breads in the store. I never thought it was worth it because I always felt they were dense, not the right flavor, etc. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RpEgD1Qstko

Hi hi, not sure if this will help but you can use chia seeds in place of eggs. 1 tbsp to 4-5 tbsp of water. Whisk and let it sit in the fridge for 15 minutes. You may need to add more water if the mix is too thick, when I make it I aim for the consistency of raw egg, so goopy but a little runny. You can sub 1 tbsp of chia seeds for 1 egg in any recipe, Goodluck!!

Made this tonight, and it came out delicious!! I subbed in grapeseed oil for the coconut oil, and used ground chia seed instead of the flax, because they are what I had on hand, and it is wonderful. Nice “whole grain” texture and nutty taste, so yummy just spread with good butter. Will definitely be making this again! I’m mostly Paleo, and LOVE your almond flour and coconut flour recipes, delicious and grain free. Thank you so much.
Grass-fed beef is often highlighted on the diet, which is promoted to contain more omega-3 fats than conventional beef (due to being fed grass instead of grain). It does contain small amounts of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), a precursor to EPA and DHA. However, only a small proportion of ALA can be converted in the body to long-chain omega-3 fatty acids (EPA and DHA). The amount of omega-3 is also highly variable depending on the exact feeding regimen and differences in fat metabolism among cattle breeds. [3] In general, the amount of omega-3 in grass-fed beef is much lower than that in oily marine fish. [3] Cooked salmon contains 1000-2000 mg of EPA/DHA per 3-ounce portion, whereas 3 ounces of grass-fed beef contains about 20-200 mg of ALA.
Thank you so much! I didn’t have any flax for the first couple of batches, so subbed extra almond flour, then made it my bread machine and it was a hit. But for this batch, I doubled to make two loaves using the ground golden flax and baked it in the oven, and it was even better!!! My son who has celiacs loves it. This is a godsend with school lunches coming up again.
I was very skeptical about this recipe. But I tell you what, I was pleasantly surprised when I ate one, thick with butter. I think one could describe them as close to what we call in New Zealand, ‘scones,’ but not sure what you call scones in the US is the same thing as here. Seeing as I haven’t had a scone in such a long time it was a treat. I don’t think I would use this recipe for buns though.
Hi Tessa, it’s hard to say what went wrong if you said you used all of the exact same ingredients as I do, and you follow the directions. The only thing I can think of is how you’re measuring your ingredients. Adding more yogurt or milk will not help and may make your bread very soggy. Let me know what happens when you try again. I will make a video showing the process soon.
Hi Faith, I make a similar bread almost every day (from the Plant Paradox Cookbook), and it calls for full fat coconut milk…it works great as well. I will try your apple cider vinegar today, as the recipe I’ve been using calls for red wine vinegar. Thanks so much for posting, and thank you for the Arrowroot substitution…sometimes it can be a challenge to find! :-D https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ip69hOWsSls
As University of California-Davis food chemist Bruce German told Pollan in an interview, “You could not survive on wheat flour. But you can survive on bread.” Microbes start to digest the grains, breaking them down in ways that free up more of the healthful parts. If bread is compared to another method of cooking flour—basically making it into porridge—”bread is dramatically more nutritious,” says Pollan.
Tonight, I tried using this differently…I coated all natural hot dogs with it and made “corn dogs”. I was able to cover 7 easily with a full recipe, minus 1 egg so it would be stiffer dough, and laid them on a Silpat covered cookie sheet. I started at 400 degrees to make sure they browned, but I ended up turning it down to 350 for about 25 minutes. They were great. Thanks again for the recipe and hard work.
Made with peanut butter instead of almond butter because that’s what I had. I could taste the coconut (which I like), but I will try substituting butter for the coconut oil next time (or half butter half coconut oil), as I am trying to find a good sandwich bread recipe for my picky 5 year old. It’s like a banana bread consistency, but when lightly toasted with butter, reminds me of regular wheat bread. Delicious, and will definitely make again! Thank you for the recipe!

A decade ago, when I was on the low-fat craze, I’d make fluffy cakes using no butter/fat, replacing it with apple sauce, which gives moisture and a soft texture. These days, I’m a low-carb girl, but a 1/4 cup of apple sauce divided by 4 = only 1 tablespoon (per roll/per 2nd day). I’m okay with that, especially because I substitute half the tapioca flour (high-carb) for whey protein powder to cut a few carbs that way. 🙂 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CGEAVWKGb1U
Wonderful recipe; made it today and will make it again. Two changes I had to make: having no golden milled flax, I had brown flax seeds which I ground in my food processor, (didn’t get as fine as milled). Also had no arrowroot, so used tapioca flour. Delighted with the results. It rose beautifully, had to bake it a few more minutes; the top was a bit less smooth than yours, and the texture is probably a bit different due to fax seed not being as fine as milled. It is still a keeper as it holds together well after slicing. My husband (not paleo) made disparaging remarks when I told him I was making paleo bread, but he ate two thick slices with butter before I snatched it away. He says it won’t hold together for sandwich, but I will make him eat his words tomorrow. Thanks for the wonderful recipe! When this is gone, I am going to make the multi-seed and nut bread.
Elana – your site is my go-to place for all baking ideas and snack recipes. I’m a huge experimenter myself, so I love using your recipes for a base (or following exactly for a trial run) and then running wild. Thank you so much for all the time and effort you put into making your recipes not only edible, but delicious and filling and healthful. I’m always excited for your post.
In making the case for meat, Cordain presents anecdotal evidence of Eskimos who lived their full life without a heart attack. The Eskimo diet consists of 97% meat, which he concedes causes all Eskimos to develop atherosclerosis—a common precursor to heart disease. But Cordain says Eskimos never die of heart disease. He discusses one Eskimo who lived 45 years and another who lived 53 years, both without heart disease! He then jumps to the conclusion that because these Eskimos didn’t get heart attacks, even with severe atherosclerosis, meat must have protected them from heart disease. So Cordain’s best case for lots of meat is that you can live to the ripe age of 45 or even 53 without a heart attack. But do people—even unhealthy smokers or the obese—generally get heart attacks before age 53?
After making this wonderful bread half a dozen times (that’s in 10 days!) I decided to experiment. To this recipe I added a handful of each: drained and dried Calamata olives, fresh rosemary, raw pecans. I doubled the salt, at least, and sprinkled a few shakes of garlic powder into the batter. The new bread is just delicious. I just finished a piece with a smear of chèvre on it whine still warm.

You may want to check out my Almond Flour page for tips on baking with almond flour and to check out some additional brands that I use. If you are nut-free, you’ll find my book, Paleo Cooking, very helpful. More than half of the recipes in this New York Times Bestselling cookbook are nut-free, and it has easy recipes for Nut-Free Crackers, Nut-Free Bread and more!
Thank you so much! I didn’t have any flax for the first couple of batches, so subbed extra almond flour, then made it my bread machine and it was a hit. But for this batch, I doubled to make two loaves using the ground golden flax and baked it in the oven, and it was even better!!! My son who has celiacs loves it. This is a godsend with school lunches coming up again. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gn1DcZKU53A
But human populations in different regions of the world ate a variety of diets. Some ate more; some ate less. They likely ate meat only when they could get it, and then they gorged. Richard Wrangham, author of Catching Fire: How Cooking Made Us Human, says diets from around the world ranged greatly in the percentage of calories from meat. It’s not cooked meat that made us human, he says, but rather cooked food. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S2wGrYngpJ0

Hi Broke, so there are a few things that could be affecting the texture of your bread. First, do you have an oven thermometer to make sure the temperature is where you need it to be? This could affect the baking time. It’s ok if you need to bake it longer, and I would let it cook until you test the middle of the bread with a stick inserted into the center. Only when it comes out clean you remove it from the oven.
Here is a way to keep Paleo fun by making a batch of Paleo pretzels. It gets boring sometimes eating a certain way, and adding novelty treats like this really makes it seem like you’re not on a diet at all. Half the fun is making these, as you don’t have to stick to the conventional pretzel shape, and can wind them into any design you wish. The other half is eating them, and there’s no worries here, since all of the ingredients conform to the parameters set by the Paleo OK foods list, a combination of coconut flour and almond flour.
It sounds like Weevils. They make cobwebs in flour and flour baked goods and were the bane of the Sailors on long voyages for centuries. I have found using a large lidded container, plastic, metal, ceramic or whatever you have, and sprinkling Diatomaceous Earth inside and round the lid keeps all my different flours healthy and hygienic. Diatomaceous Earth is a natural silica like powder which can even be taken internally, and totally dehydrates any bugs etc leaving them very dead. I use it in my chicken run and even on my cats and in their food. It keeps them healthy and parasite free. It is a sustainable, non chemical product – just check its Food grade before buying it. I guess they seell it in the US. It’s used a lot here in the UK.

Hi Tessa, it’s hard to say what went wrong if you said you used all of the exact same ingredients as I do, and you follow the directions. The only thing I can think of is how you’re measuring your ingredients. Adding more yogurt or milk will not help and may make your bread very soggy. Let me know what happens when you try again. I will make a video showing the process soon.

Cordain explains that high intake of fruits and vegetables is one of best ways to reduce chances of cancer and heart disease. He notes that protein has twice the calorie burning effect of fat and carbs and is more satiating than both. He explains that starch, fats, sugars, and salts together cause us to keep eating. So if we limit our diet to fruits and vegetables and/or meat, we’ll stop eating when we’re full. And if you stop eating when you’re full, you’ll lose weight and won’t get fat. And as you lose weight, your cholesterol will improve (regardless of what you eat). This all makes sense and can’t really be disputed. If you want to lose weight, the Paleo diet will get you there and probably quickly. But Cordain’s hypothesis applied to long-term health falls short. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5J56pHrhyEg
I have recently discovered your website and I’m so pleased that I did. There is so much content there. It’s the bread I’m particularly interested in at this point since I have not had any bread for about two and a half years so I went straight there. I tried your world famous paleo bread and I must say it was very nice. However it does not look like your bread in that mine was much darker and much denser. I tried to find a comment where you addressed this issue but I only got as far as some comments regarding the height of the bread. You stated that the tin size was most likely incorrect. I’m sure my tin as a bit on the big side but when I look at the pic of your bread I can see yours is a much lighter bread than mine and also much lighter in colour.
I just made the paleo bread & it smells delicious. I did make a mistake in my haste & added baking powder instead of soda. So this batch is getting 1 1/2 tsp of both. I didn’t have the size pan you used so am using a regular loaf pan but it isn’t squatty at all! I checked internal temp & it was close to 170. Can’t wait to try it. Thanks for sharing your recipes – you are a gem!
Hi, LOVE this bread!! So do my kids :) I have a problem though with the bread sticking in places to the bottom, so I tend to lose some of it..(handy quick desert though) Any suggestions as to how to keep the loaf intact? I have been using lard to liberally grease the bottom, Its still sticking. I have been waiting about 15 minutes before trying to remove it….should it be cold? Thanks A bunch!!

The digestive abilities of anatomically modern humans, however, are different from those of Paleolithic humans, which undermines the diet's core premise.[4] During the 2.6-million-year-long Paleolithic era, the highly variable climate and worldwide spread of human populations meant that humans were, by necessity, nutritionally adaptable. Supporters of the diet mistakenly presuppose that human digestion has remained essentially unchanged over time.[4][5] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zhL5DCizj5c
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