Take 30 days and give it a shot – cut out the grains and dairy, start eating more vegetables and fruits, eat more humanely raised and non-grain fed meat, cut out the liquid calories and sugar, and see how you feel after the month is up. If you’re analytical and want numbers to use in your final verdict, get your blood work done at the beginning and end of the month.
In light of Paleo's low ranking in US News & World Report, it stands to reason why most RDs don't advocate the diet—and for a variety of reasons. "The Paleo diet has a lot of good things going for it. It recommends excluding processed foods and refined sugars and emphasizes fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, and lean protein," says Heather Mangieri, MS, RDN, CSSD, LDN, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and author of Fueling Young Athletes. However, Mangieri says, "Any diet that suggests eliminating an entire food group can set you up for nutritional deficiencies, boredom, and an overfocus on food." Because the diet eliminates all dairy, meeting calcium and vitamin D requirements can be difficult. Mangieri has experienced this issue firsthand in her private practice. "Even though Paleo proponents claim they can meet their calcium needs from nondairy foods, I have yet to find a client that eats that many greens and is that thought out in their eating. Supplementation becomes a must to meet the needs for these nutrients." https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FsNAQwZfagA
I didn’t have almond flour so substituted 1 cup millet flour and 1 cup sorghum flour for the almond flour, and baked in an 7.5″ x 4.5″ x 2.5″ loaf pan. The loaf was short, about 1.5″ tall, the texture was pleasantly dense and held together well. The taste, however, was pasty (like flour) and the bread was dry. (I noticed afterwards that the sorghum flour package said to substitute 15-20% sorghum flour in your recipe, so that may have affected the taste and dryness.) I tried a slice with a topping of honey, and that was pretty good, but not good enough. So I made croutons, which were delicious. I cut the bread into small cubes and spread them on a cookie sheet, sprayed them with olive oil spray and drizzled 1/2 stick of butter over them, then seasoned generously with Nature’s Seasonings and garlic powder (for a richer crouton, could also sprinkle with parmesan cheese). I tossed them to distribute the seasonings and baked them at 350 degrees about 20 minutes until crunchy. I’ll try the recipe again when I have almond flour.

So.. let’s talk about the needed part. Quick, what’s the one thing you can’t live without, food wise? That you NEED!! Here’s what I hear a lot when I explain the Paleo or grain free style of eating. “Oh my Goodness, how can I live without bread or a good sandwich bread?” Well ya, bread is so delicious and I don’t always make paleo bread, but when I do, it’s usually for a good reason.
This is really good. I only use 3 eggs,. I didn’t have any arrowroot powder, so I used cornstarch instead. I used lemon juice instead of ACV because ACV gives me migraines and I used coconut cream (don’t like yogurt). It tasted a bit like sweet bread, but it made an excellent sandwich. It didn’t rise like the picture. I’m sure it because of the substitutions I made. I always make sandwiches cutting the bread in half anyway so it didn’t matter that it didn’t rise as high as the picture shows. This will be my go to bread for now on. Oh yeah. I baked it for 45 minutes instead of 25. Ovens temperatures and climates varies for baking. I always baked paleo breads on 350 degrees for 45 minutes. It comes out perfect every time. Thank you so much for posted this recipe. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zq0Ix-Vfoww
I made it this afternoon and it is delicious!! My main problem with other paleo breads was that they crumble, but this one holds its shape so well and toasts amazingly! I didn’t have honey and had to sub maple syrup and it was delicious and I doubt there was much difference taste-wise from the honey. But just FYI to those minus honey, maple syrup is a fine substitute! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=utN3rSTuH6o
Excluding foods. The exclusion of entire categories of commonly eaten foods like whole grains and dairy requires frequent label reading in the supermarket and in restaurants. It may also increase the risk of deficiencies such as calcium, vitamin D, and B vitamins, if these nutrients are not consistently eaten from the allowed foods or a vitamin supplement. For example, there are some nondairy calcium-rich foods that are absorbed well by the body such as collard and turnip greens or canned bone-in sardines and salmon, but you would have to eat five or more servings of these greens and fish bones daily to meet recommended calcium needs. (Note that some greens like spinach that are touted to be calcium-rich also contain oxalates and phytates that bind to calcium so very little is actually absorbed.) One small, short-term intervention study of healthy participants showed a 53% decrease from baseline in calcium intake after following a Paleo diet for three weeks. [8] Furthermore, the exclusion of whole grains can result in reduced consumption of beneficial nutrients such as fiber and thus may increase one’s risk for diabetes and heart disease.

I love this bread, and so do my German, bread-loving children! Hearty, rich German bread is the best in the world so that’s no small praise. I have a regular glass loaf pan, and adapt the recipe to make a full-size loaf. I add 1 extra egg (very large) and increase other ingredients 25%. Baking time is usually 5-10 minutes longer, although I reduce the temperature to 325 after it begins to brown to compensate for the glass pan. Topped with butter or pumpkin seed butter, this is my 3-year-old son’s favorite “treat” ever! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_6RGTb3Yki0


The digestive abilities of anatomically modern humans, however, are different from those of Paleolithic humans, which undermines the diet's core premise.[4] During the 2.6-million-year-long Paleolithic era, the highly variable climate and worldwide spread of human populations meant that humans were, by necessity, nutritionally adaptable. Supporters of the diet mistakenly presuppose that human digestion has remained essentially unchanged over time.[4][5] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zhL5DCizj5c
×