In the AM, swap your large latte and Benedict for poached eggs with nutritious sides: avocado, spinach, and tomatoes. In the PM simple dishes that are rich in quality protein and fat prove best: steak, poultry or fish, with a salad and vegetables. Avoid carb and sugar loaded options like pizza, pasta, and dishes that can hide other nasty ingredients. And of course, always say no to the bread basket.


I’ve always hated “fad” diets because any intelligent person should know elimination of an entire nutrient is dumb. I have bated around the idea of Paleo for a while and the more I read and think about it, and it does make the most sense. I am going to start working towards a more pure Paleo diet by cutting out the bread and pasta. I’m not committed to giving up coffee or tea, something not really addressed here. I mean you said do in steps right? We don’t want the caffeine withdrawals with the carb withdrawals. In my case I might loose my mind completely. So how do those beverages fit into this idea of eating Paleo? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OWjvq2GB0uc
Paleo is an ancestral approach that prioritizes eating real, whole, nutrient-dense foods. At its core, Paleo is about trying to eat real, naturally occurring ingredients that are healthful rather than harmful. Biologically, our bodies respond best to real, whole, nutrient-dense foods like plants, meat, and seafood—all of them packed with the nutrients our bodies evolved to thrive on. It was only after industrialized food production and lab-engineered edibles took over our diets that the ”diseases of civilization“ exploded. Today, wheat, soy, sugar, and highly processed foods continue to drive up rates of autoimmune disorders, cardiovascular disease, type-2 diabetes, and obesity. But by getting back to eating real food, we can stay healthier and happier.
Cooking becomes an overwhelming chore when we get too wrapped up in complicated, time-consuming recipes. To be practical and sustainable, ancestral nutrition has to be easy. As a working mom, I’m always on the lookout for shortcuts in the kitchen, and often rely on modern conveniences that cavemen never enjoyed, like pressure cookers, slow cookers, and food processors. (I also appreciate indoor plumbing, for what it’s worth.)
The rationale for the Paleolithic diet derives from proponents' claims relating to evolutionary medicine.[22] Advocates of the diet state that humans were genetically adapted to eating specifically those foods that were readily available to them in their local environments. These foods therefore shaped the nutritional needs of Paleolithic humans. They argue that the physiology and metabolism of modern humans have changed little since the Paleolithic era.[23] Natural selection is a long process, and the cultural and lifestyle changes introduced by western culture have occurred quickly. The argument is that modern humans have therefore not been able to adapt to the new circumstances.[24] The agricultural revolution brought the addition of grains and dairy to the diet.[25]
All involve eating whole foods (as opposed to packaged and processed) and filling your plate with quality sources of protein, healthy fats, complex carbohydrates, and vitamin-, mineral-, and fiber-rich vegetables. (Again, we’re talking about the ones that fall somewhere on the healthy spectrum, not unhealthy fad diets like, ahem, the Grapefruit Diet.) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aDs5M-i4GOA

Cancer: Disease of Civilization? An anthropological and historical study by Vilhjalmur Stefansson. This classic shows what happens before and after tribes were "civilized." Covers day-to-day experience of Eskimo life. Published in 1960. Used copies are available at a steep price. To read it get it on inter-library loan. Another of his many books My Life with the Eskimo (New Edition) is available. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NkdRgTzaJtY
Butternut squash is a hardy winter squash that is known for its sweet flavor and extremely high levels of Vitamin A and Vitamin C. This recipe uses the tasty flavor of butternut squash to create fritters that are an incredible snack. Though the flour used in the recipe is not actually paleo, you can substitute your favorite paleo-free flour alternative such as almond meal or tapioca starch. YOur fritters will still come out great! Since butternut squash is full of starch, the fritters will not fall apart without gluten. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GmvM6syadl0
These sweet and sour gummy candies are actually good for you. Pretty weird huh? They are really easy and actually a lot of fun to make. All you do is mix the ingredients, put them into a mold either by pouring or using a plastic bag with a small hole in the corner. Then either put them in the refrigerator or freezer to set depending on how big of a hurry you’re in. You could make them any shape or color you’d like. I’m thinking about making some for my Halloween party using these molds. Wilton Pumpkin Patch Silicone Mold, here is a Wilton Heart Mold. I suggest just searching around on Amazon for Wilton silicone mold and then the shape or holiday you’d like it for. I’m sure you can find just what you’re looking for. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JL-uSe8utFs
The trouble with that view, however, is that what they’re eating is probably nothing like the diet of hunter-gatherers, says Michael Pollan, author of a number of best-selling books on food and agriculture, including Cooked: A Natural History of Transformation. “I don’t think we really understand…well the proportions in the ancient diet,” argues Pollan on the latest episode of the Inquiring Minds podcast (stream below). “Most people who tell you with great confidence that this is what our ancestors ate—I think they’re kind of blowing smoke.”
The Primal Blueprint Cookbook: Primal, Low Carb, Paleo, Grain-Free, Dairy-Free and Gluten-Free by Mark Sisson and Jennifer Meier. Recipes include: Roasted Leg of Lamb with Herbs and Garlic, Salmon Chowder with Coconut Milk, Tomatoes Stuffed with Ground Bison and Eggs, and Baked Chocolate Custard. Recipes are simple and have limited ingredients. Complaints are the book is stuffed with unnecessary photos and proofreading could have been better, e.g. oven temperatures were left out. And recipes are not truly paleo. Despite what is on the cover dairy is used in some recipes. The Amazon reviews average to 4+ stars. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xO9hgIjup6c

NOTICE: The information contained or presented on this website is for educational purposes only. Information on this site is NOT intended to serve as a substitute for diagnosis, treatment, or advice from a qualified, licensed medical professional. The facts presented are offered as information only - not medical advice - and in no way should anyone infer that we or anyone appearing in any content on this website are practicing medicine. Any diet, health, or nutritional program you undertake should be discussed with your doctor or other licensed medical professional. Seek the advice of a medical professional for proper application of ANY material on this site to your specific situation. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nrlFu0Lsqbc

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