I wrote a book called The Paleo Solution which went on to become a New York Times Bestseller. This book incorporates the latest, cutting edge research from genetics, biochemistry and anthropology to help you look, feel and perform your best. I am a research biochemist who traded in his lab coat and pocket protector for a whistle and a stopwatch to become one of the most sought after strength and conditioning coaches in the world. With my unique perspective as both scientist and coach you will learn how simple nutrition, exercise and lifestyle changes can radically change your appearance and health for the better.
Autoimmunity is a process in which our bodies own immune system attacks “us.” Normally the immune system protects us from bacterial, viral, and parasitic infections. The immune system identifies a foreign invader, attacks it, and ideally clears the infection. A good analogy for autoimmunity is the case of tissue rejection after organ donation. If someone requires a new heart, lung kidney or liver due to disease or injury, a donor organ may be an option. The first step in this process is trying to find a tissue “match”. All of us have molecules in our tissues that our immune system uses to recognize self from non-self. If a donated organ is not close enough to the recipient in tissue type the immune system will attack and destroy the organ. In autoimmunity, a similar process occurs in that an individuals own tissue is confused as something foreign and the immune system attacks this “mislabeled” tissue. Common forms of autoimmunity include Multiple Sclerosis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Lupus, and Vitiligo to name only a tiny fraction of autoimmune diseases. Elements of autoimmunity are likely at play in conditions as seemingly unrelated as Schizophrenia, infertility, and various forms of cancer.
Some Paleo dieters emphasize that they never believed in one true caveman lifestyle or diet and that—in the fashion of Sisson's Blueprint—they use our evolutionary past to form guidelines, not scripture. That strategy seems reasonably solid at first, but quickly disintegrates. Even though researchers know enough to make some generalizations about human diets in the Paleolithic with reasonable certainty, the details remain murky. Exactly what proportions of meat and vegetables did different hominid species eat in the Paleolithic? It's not clear. Just how far back were our ancestors eating grains and dairy? Perhaps far earlier than we initially thought. What we can say for certain is that in the Paleolithic, the human diet varied immensely by geography, season and opportunity. "We now know that humans have evolved not to subsist on a single, Paleolithic diet but to be flexible eaters, an insight that has important implications for the current debate over what people today should eat in order to be healthy," anthropologist William Leonard of Northwestern University wrote in Scientific American in 2002. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8pN4G7rITNE
The Paleo Answer: 7 Days to Lose Weight, Feel Great, Stay Young by Loren Cordain. The author shows you how to supercharge the Paleo diet for optimal lifelong health and weight loss. Featuring a new prescriptive 7-day plan and surprising revelations from the author's original research, it's the most powerful Paleo guide yet. Published December 20, 2011.
Autoimmune diseases (such as Ankylosing Spondylitis, Lupus and others) are multifactorial in their causes, however some research now suggests a Paleo based diet may help autoimmune conditions and improve the underlying imbalance of gut micro-flora. The gut micro-flora generally has significant effects on gut and immune function. Despite the possible benefits of a Paleo based diet, we strongly recommend you seek the support of a suitable health professional both before making any changes to your diet or physical routine and as well as during the Program, so that progress can be monitored and guidance provided for any adjustments made to suit your individual sate. Monitoring by a medical professional of the dosages of any medications you are on is also recommended.
It is not quite lunch and it is not quite dinner. You have already had breakfast hours ago but you are still craving something…anything! It is that dreaded time of day when you just need a snack. But what can you have? Eating a paleo diet is tricky enough when planning your main meals but now you also need to consider what to eat in between meals. This may seem like a daunting task at first but it is not as hard as you may think!
Even people who hate kale will be converted after giving this recipe a try. Baking the kale in the oven removes the slightly bitter taste and makes the kale crispy. The key to getting enough crunch in your kale chips is to make sure the leaves are completely dry before you coat them in olive oil- any moisture will prevent that crunch! This basic recipe just seasons them with salt and pepper but cheese, chili powder, or vinegar can be added to make them taste just like your favorite chip flavor.
You may lose weight on the Paleo Diet. If you build a “calorie deficit” into your Paleo plan – eating fewer calories than your daily recommended max or burning off extra by exercising – you should shed some pounds. How quickly and whether you keep them off is up to you. A 2015 review in the Journal of Gastrointestinal Liver Diseases concluded that a Paleo-esque diet “might be an acceptable antidote to the unhealthy Western diet, but only unequivocal results from randomized controlled trials or meta-analyses will support this hypothesis.” On that, we’re still waiting. In the meantime, here’s what has been found about the diet and others like it:
We can think of no better principles than The Paleo Way for individuals with Crohn’s disease. In an acute state of Crohn’s disease it’s likely you may have specific foods included or excluded to get the inflammation down as efficiently as possible. Of course it is necessary and we strongly recommend you seek trusted health professional advice and support both before and during any dietary change and healing processes to monitor your progress and to help tailor any elements to be particularly suitable for your individual needs. With your trusted health professional you should address underlying immune dysfunction involved with Crohn’s disease. You should also have any medication use monitored by your medical professional.
Eat generous amounts of saturated fats like coconut oil and butter or clarified butter. Beef tallow, lard and duck fat are also good, but only if they come from healthy and well-treated animals. Beef or lamb tallow is a better choice than lamb or duck fat. Olive, avocado and macadamia oil are also good fats to use in salads and to drizzle over food, but not for cooking. For more information, have a look at our beginner’s guide to Paleo and fat.

So, whether you are craving something salty or something sweet, there is definitely a snack on this list for you. The wide variety of paleo snacks will keep you interested and excited for quite some time. You’ll never get into a snacking rut when you have these recipes available! When you find one that you like, try altering it a little bit too. Swap out those chia seed for flaxseeds or try a new combination of seasonings in your recipe. Keeping it fresh and thinking creatively as you cook is a way to truly succeed on the paleo diet. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oRuK62LZgj8


Several examples of recent and relatively speedy human evolution underscore that our anatomy and genetics have not been set in stone since the stone age. Within a span of 7,000 years, for instance, people adapted to eating dairy by developing lactose tolerance. Usually, the gene encoding an enzyme named lactase—which breaks down lactose sugars in milk—shuts down after infancy; when dairy became prevalent, many people evolved a mutation that kept the gene turned on throughout life. Likewise, the genetic mutation responsible for blue eyes likely arose between 6,000 and 10,000 years ago. And in regions where malaria is common, natural selection has modified people's immune systems and red blood cells in ways that help them resist the mosquito-borne disease; some of these genetic mutations appeared within the last 10,000 or even 5,000 years. The organisms with which we share our bodies have evolved even faster, particularly the billions of bacteria living in our intestines. Our gut bacteria interact with our food in many ways, helping us break down tough plant fibers, but also competing for calories. We do not have direct evidence of which bacterial species thrived in Paleolithic intestines, but we can be sure that their microbial communities do not exactly match our own. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6q-9OvUXEnk


These sweet potato chips do a great job of filling in for regular potato chips. They have the same texture you’re looking for, both as you pick them up and once you put them in your mouth. The sea salt ensures that they’re salty enough to satisfy, and the rosemary gives them a distinct flavor that really plays well with the sweet potato. And of course sweet potatoes bring a lot more to the table in regards to nutrients and fiber, so you’re actually helping yourself along with these rather than with potato chips that will only set you back. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kx6fTrGb6hA

Obesity, heart disease, and diabetes: These are just a few of the health conditions that proponents of the Paleolithic diet, or caveman diet, blame on our sedentary lifestyles and modern diets, which are loaded with sugar, fat, and processed foods. Their proposed solution? Cut modern foods from our diet and return to the way our early hunter-gatherer ancestors ate. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UEWaInxB4aI
Take 30 days and give it a shot – cut out the grains and dairy, start eating more vegetables and fruits, eat more humanely raised and non-grain fed meat, cut out the liquid calories and sugar, and see how you feel after the month is up. If you’re analytical and want numbers to use in your final verdict, get your blood work done at the beginning and end of the month. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g_pUwYbFgpY
#1) If you’re not careful, this type of diet can get expensive. But as we know, with a little research, we can make eating healthy incredibly affordable. Admittedly, while I recommend eating organic fruits and veggies, free range chicken, and grass-fed beef whenever possible, these products can be a bit more expensive in conventional stores due to the processes needed to get them there. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BBFw9ymd78k

“I think there are a lot of positives about it,” Holley says. “It cuts out a lot of processed foods just naturally, like processed grains or added sugar through soft drinks or juice.” And because the diet promotes eating anti-inflammatory foods — like fruits, vegetables, and unsaturated fats in nuts and certain oils — your health could benefit, Holley explains. Cutting out processed foods and sugar will also help lower your risk of certain diseases, like type 2 diabetes and certain cancers, she says. (6)
Fat and Cholesterol are Good for You by Uffe Ravnskov is a new book which includes updated and simplified sections from his previous one (The Cholesterol Myths). Ravnskov also presents his own idea about the cause of heart disease, an idea that explains all the findings that do not fit with the present view. It is a powerful book. Also see his web site. The Amazon.com reviews average to 5 stars. Published January 26, 2009. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iuUucqQDQ7o
Cancer: Disease of Civilization? An anthropological and historical study by Vilhjalmur Stefansson. This classic shows what happens before and after tribes were "civilized." Covers day-to-day experience of Eskimo life. Published in 1960. Used copies are available at a steep price. To read it get it on inter-library loan. Another of his many books My Life with the Eskimo (New Edition) is available. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pOjLTpnd8r4
These wings will really hit the spot if you’ve been craving chicken wings, and are too far from your next meal to hold out. The pecan flavor comes from the smoking process, not from actual pecans. That way you’ll get a hint of pecan in every bite, without having to worry about crunchy pieces stuck to the chicken. The cool thing about this recipe is that it makes everything from scratch, so you don’t have to resort to getting things out of a bottle. Our suggestion is to make a big batch and store the rest since this isn’t exactly fast food. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CrvtOgOZwgs
These pizza bites don’t need a crust because they’re resting on a slice of uncured pepperoni or salami. This makes them a snack that you can make in a jiffy, because you don’t have to wait around for the crust to bake. It also helps give them a big pizza taste, even if you opt out of the optional organic mozzarella cheese. The sauce is the real kicker here, and it’s made using organic tomato sauce and the necessary ingredients to make it taste like a pizza. Drop a black olive slice right in the middle and these pizza bites are ready to consumption.
In the long term, you have to be sure you’re getting calcium and other nutrients you’re missing by not having dairy products and certain grains. Some paleo-approved foods, such as salmon and spinach, contain calcium, so you have to be sure you’re including them in your diet. It would be a good idea to check with a registered dietitian, too, to make sure you’re meeting your calcium and other nutrient needs.
Many of you have tried some version of a stuffed vegetable at your meals such as a tuna-stuffed tomato or beef-stuffed peppers, but there is no reason why you can’t incorporate similar items into your snacks as part of your Paleo plan.  By rotating various colorful varieties of vegetables into your snacks, you’ll  be fueling your body with loads of vitamins, minerals, and anti-oxidants.  Stuffed vegetables can be made into gluten-free, grain-free, dairy-free snack options with a little creativity and advance preparation.  Definitely not taste-free, glance over some of the recipes listed below and see which one sounds like it might be a tasty addition to your snack rotation:

Like other fad diets, the Paleo diet is promoted as a way of improving health.[2] There is some evidence that following this diet may lead to improvements in terms of body composition and metabolic effects compared with the typical Western diet[6] or compared with diets recommended by national nutritional guidelines.[9] There is no good evidence, however, that the diet helps with weight loss, other than through the normal mechanisms of calorie restriction.[10] Following the Paleo diet can lead to an inadequate calcium intake, and side effects can include weakness, diarrhea, and headaches.[3][10] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zhL5DCizj5c
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