The NY Times had a blog article on Good News on Saturated Fat which is reporting on Gary Taubes's interpretation of the new report in The New England Journal of Medicine on a two-year diet experiment in Israel. A followup is the post The Fat Fight Goes On where Gary rebuts the arguments against the study. And here's a good interview with Taubes (and includes a good summary): Gary Taubes on Cold Fusion, Good Nutrition and What Makes Bad (and Good) Science.
To get an idea of what that means, we turned to the experts, including Loren Cordain, PhD, a professor emeritus at Colorado State University in Fort Collins, Colorado, and the author of The Paleo Diet; Erin Holley, RD, of Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center in Columbus, Ohio; and Lona Sandon, PhD, RD, an assistant professor of clinical nutrition at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas.
These fig bars have a lot going on, and your taste buds are sure to thank you for such a nice midday treat. At the same time they are loaded with healthy things like apples, peaches, and the figs themselves. They’ve removed any trace of grains, and are using coconut flour to put them into bar form, with just the right amount of honey to make these sweet but not overly so. The use of cinnamon, nutmeg, and ginger really balances out the flavor profile for these, and you can eat them between breakfast and lunch, or between lunch and dinner so they’re very good to have handy.

LOREN CORDAIN, Ph.D., is one of the top global researchers in the area of evolutionary medicine. Generally acknowledged as the world's leading expert on the Paleolithic diet, he is a professor in the Health and Exercise Science Department at Colorado State University. Dr. Cordain and his research have been featured on Dateline NBC and in the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, and other media. He is the author of The Paleo Diet and The Paleo Diet Cookbook, among other books, and makes regular media and speaking appearances worldwide.


But critics argue that the unlimited amount of red meat the paleo diet allows may have an adverse effect on heart health in people with diabetes, as research links eating red meat in excess to poor heart health. (11)  If you have diabetes and don’t moderate your red-meat intake, this could be a big problem, as people with diabetes are 2 times as likely to die of heart disease as people who do not have diabetes. (12)

One of the things that people miss the most when they first start trying to follow the paleo diet are classic, greasy,  french fries from fast food restaurants. This recipe is the perfect nutritious substitute. The mildly sweet flavor of carrots makes a tasty fry and carrots are also packed with vitamin A and other nutrients. Since these carrot fries are baked instead of deep fried, they are low in calories while still being crisp and crunchy. An all-around win! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zo49Pyhii-k
Still, many scientists have expressed concern that we do not yet have enough evidence to make any strong claims about the paleo diet’s health benefits, especially its long-term effects. In fact, in an article in response to the first review, authors Tanis R. Fenton and Carol J. Fenton, from the Cumming School of Medicine in Canada, wrote a letter to the editor in which they expressed their disappointment with the review. (5)
Adoption of the Paleolithic diet assumes that modern humans can reproduce the hunter-gatherer diet. Molecular biologist Marion Nestle argues that "knowledge of the relative proportions of animal and plant foods in the diets of early humans is circumstantial, incomplete, and debatable and that there are insufficient data to identify the composition of a genetically determined optimal diet. The evidence related to Paleolithic diets is best interpreted as supporting the idea that diets based largely on plant foods promote health and longevity, at least under conditions of food abundance and physical activity."[35] Ideas about Paleolithic diet and nutrition are at best hypothetical.[36]
These sweet potato chips do a great job of filling in for regular potato chips. They have the same texture you’re looking for, both as you pick them up and once you put them in your mouth. The sea salt ensures that they’re salty enough to satisfy, and the rosemary gives them a distinct flavor that really plays well with the sweet potato. And of course sweet potatoes bring a lot more to the table in regards to nutrients and fiber, so you’re actually helping yourself along with these rather than with potato chips that will only set you back. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kx6fTrGb6hA
Pastries are one of the hardest foods to recreate in a paleo friendly manner because traditional wheat flour substitutes are too heavy to create a light, flaky crust. This recipe uses a blend of arrowroot powder and almond flour to create a soft, delicious tart that is topped with thinly sliced apples coated in cinnamon. Coconut milk and cane sugar is then used to create a paleo version of a salted caramel sauce that is drizzled on top of the tarts.
Sweet potatoes are used instead of corn in this version of corn chips, since corn is a definite no-go on the Paleo diet. The use of sweet potatoes is a popular one, and they typically act as a stand in for ordinary potatoes. Here they do a good job of providing a crunchy and hearty experience, like the kind you get from corn chips. The accompanying spices and seasonings all work well together, and these are great for dipping into all sorts of things, like the hummus or salsa recipes found above.
The mild sweetness of beet roots seems like it would make the ideal oven-baked chip but many people struggle to achieve the right texture on these chips. This paleo snack recipe shows you how to get the beets to release some moisture before baking so they get crunchy without becoming burnt and bitter. You can use both red and gold beet chips with this recipe to create a snack that is both beautiful and delicious. You’ll be a beet lover soon enough!
Given the unhealthy options available at airport and on most flights, it’s a great plan to come prepared with your own Paleo snacks. Check the security requirements at the airports you’re travelling through to determine which of the following options will be allowed on your airplane. Hopefully with unopened packets, you should have no problems, but do check first!

One of the things that people miss the most when they first start trying to follow the paleo diet are classic, greasy,  french fries from fast food restaurants. This recipe is the perfect nutritious substitute. The mildly sweet flavor of carrots makes a tasty fry and carrots are also packed with vitamin A and other nutrients. Since these carrot fries are baked instead of deep fried, they are low in calories while still being crisp and crunchy. An all-around win!
We strongly advise that you get in touch with your healthcare professional if you are pregnant or lactating to tell them exactly what you are doing before making any changes to your diet or exercise regime. Although we believe many of the dietary changes advocated through this Program could be quite beneficial, every circumstance and pregnancy is different and close, careful monitoring is advised. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jQDpobq7jYY&t=91s
×