My blog, cookbooks, cooking app, and podcast, are intended to help you translate the “rules of the road” into delicious, easy-to-prepare meals for you and your family. Here, you’ll see the way I eat on an everyday basis, and my recipes, too. In case you’re wondering, I cook entirely gluten- and soy-free, and steer clear of legumes and refined vegetable and seed oils.
These orange gummies are made to exacting standards of quality, right down to the use of grass-fed gelatin. When eating Paleo you’ll have to get used to the process of being very discerning with the types of products you buy and consume. It’s almost like starting a revolution against the world around you since so much of what you see in stores and at restaurants is not Paleo, and has either been genetically modified or is conventionally grown. This recipe exemplifies the sort of pickiness you have to have about what goes in your body. At the same time it provides a yummy orange-flavored snack that’s great anytime.
Almost equal numbers of advocates and critics seem to have gathered at the Paleo diet dinner table and both tribes have a few particularly vociferous members. Critiques of the Paleo diet range from the mild—Eh, it's certainly not the worst way to eat—to the acerbic: It is nonsensical and sometimes dangerously restrictive. Most recently, in her book Paleofantasy, evolutionary biologist Marlene Zuk of the University of California, Riverside, debunks what she identifies as myths central to the Paleo diet and the larger Paleo lifestyle movement.
Fasting for a predetermined period of time, shortening the eating window. Popular IF protocols include daily 16 hour fasts with 8 hour feeding windows, or weekly 24 hour fasts. Less of a “diet,” more of a philosophy. You can combine damn near any diet with a practice of intermittent fasting, be it Paleo, Primal, vegan, vegetarian, Bulletproof, Standard American, or anything between.
Paleo is an ancestral approach that prioritizes eating real, whole, nutrient-dense foods. At its core, Paleo is about trying to eat real, naturally occurring ingredients that are healthful rather than harmful. Biologically, our bodies respond best to real, whole, nutrient-dense foods like plants, meat, and seafood—all of them packed with the nutrients our bodies evolved to thrive on. It was only after industrialized food production and lab-engineered edibles took over our diets that the ”diseases of civilization“ exploded. Today, wheat, soy, sugar, and highly processed foods continue to drive up rates of autoimmune disorders, cardiovascular disease, type-2 diabetes, and obesity. But by getting back to eating real food, we can stay healthier and happier.
The Soft Science of Dietary Fat is a summary of an article in Science Magazine reporting that mainstream nutritional science has demonized dietary fat, yet 50 years and hundreds of millions of dollars of research have failed to prove that eating a low-fat diet will help you live longer. In fact, there are good reasons to believe high-carbohydrate diets may be even worse than high-fat diets. Here is the text from the original article by Gary Taubes.
Plenty of recipes for bacon cups already exist but this paleo snack recipe puts a European twist on the trend and also makes it much easier to create the crunchy meat cups. Round slices of salami are quickly baked in a muffin tin until they turn into crisp little cups that can be filled with a mix of avocado and tomatoes. The flavor is similar to a BLT sandwich, but these snack cups are paleo and low carb. Try using these cups to hold other dips as well!
To get an idea of what that means, we turned to the experts, including Loren Cordain, PhD, a professor emeritus at Colorado State University in Fort Collins, Colorado, and the author of The Paleo Diet; Erin Holley, RD, of Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center in Columbus, Ohio; and Lona Sandon, PhD, RD, an assistant professor of clinical nutrition at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ST7DrKyjPRY
Eat generous amounts of saturated fats like coconut oil and butter or clarified butter. Beef tallow, lard and duck fat are also good, but only if they come from healthy and well-treated animals. Beef or lamb tallow is a better choice than lamb or duck fat. Olive, avocado and macadamia oil are also good fats to use in salads and to drizzle over food, but not for cooking. For more information, have a look at our beginner’s guide to Paleo and fat. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RpEgD1Qstko
Best stuff ever. I swear. There’s so many different HEALTHY flavors of jerky and meat sticks and even ones for kids! I love their traditional beef jerky and I can’t stop eating the cilantro lime flavored sticks. The date and rosemary flavor is pretty freaking amazing as well. There’s so many options that there’s no way you won’t find something you can’t get enough of!

We Want to Live: The Primal Diet (2005 Expanded Edition) is a book by Aajonus Vonderplanitz. His basic philosophy is that (a) food is to be eaten in a live, raw condition; and (b) a diet rich in raw fats and raw meats from natural sources is essential to health. However his diet includes massive amounts of raw dairy. From the Planets is a book review by Ralph W. Moss. The Live-Food Mailing List discusses the concepts of this book.
Avocados make a great snack all by themselves, but they can be a little bland sometimes, and this is a great way to doll them up so they’re even tastier. This uses Greek yogurt, which is a fermented form of dairy and considered acceptable by some following the Paleo plan. Others see it as dairy is dairy and don’t eat it, so it’s up to you to decide if you want to incorporate a bit of fermented dairy like Greek yogurt into your diet or not. The rest of the recipe is just a bit of seasoning to help the avocado out in the flavor department.

A big soft pretzel slathered in butter, cinnamon and sugar, mustard, or cheese sauce is the ultimate guilty pleasure. These paleo pretzels are so healthy that you can snack on them without ruining your diet- how is that possible?!. Cassava flour and coconut sugar are used to create a pretzel that is the ideal blend of soft and chewy. However, be aware that these pretzels may harden up after they get cold so they are best when served right out of the oven (don’t worry, you won’t have a hard time eating them all!).


If you’re a big fan of chips, you’ll be happy to know that you don’t have to give them up when following the Paleo diet.  While you may not be able to incorporate your favorite brands from childhood or run by the convenience store for a quick snack bag, fruit and veggie chips are a much healthier and lighter alternative.  Although you can find pricey bags of these types of chips at most grocery stores today, the ingredient list can be questionable.  Compared to the equivalent, make-at-home fruit and veggie chips will provide your body with energizing nutrients.  Here are some recipes for chips that you can feel good about eating:
Instead of just eating broccoli raw, you can add it to a batter to make delicious broccoli feta fritters. Feta cheese and red pepper flakes add a Mediterranean flair to these fritters while broccoli provides a massive amount of Vitamin C to these healthy treats. This unique recipe purees broccoli before mixing it together with paleo-friendly flour and frying it. The resulting fritters are chewy without falling apart and they taste great when topped with hummus or another paleo dip. Make a big fritter and server it as a main meal like a veggie burger! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ogf0TuIpffg
Primarily aimed at reducing inflammation, balancing blood sugar and hormones, and increasing cognitive performance, all achieved by improving fat metabolism. Based around the popular “Bulletproof Coffee.” Bulletproof differs from Paleo because of its emphasis on “Bulletproof” supplements and shunning of higher carbohydrate foods like fruit and tubers. The Bulletproof Diet lies somewhere between Keto and Paleo. Check out The Bulletproof Diet by Dave Asprey. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oqA3yHdSeSM
The paleo diet (also nicknamed the caveman diet, primal diet, Stone Age diet, and hunter-gatherer diet) is hugely popular these days, and goes by one simple question: What would a caveman eat? Here, we explain what the paleo diet involves, its pros and cons, and, ultimately, what a modern person needs to know to decide whether or not to take the paleo diet plunge. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8t2pdg16t1g
We’re in a position to understand more of the benefits of the Paleo diet now that we have a basic understanding of which food sources are emphasized. One major benefit of the Paleo diet is an increased consumption of vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, and plant phytochemicals. Whole grains are not a good substitute for grass-produced or free-ranging meats, fruits, and veggies, as they contain no vitamin C, vitamin A, or vitamin B12. Many of the minerals and some of the B vitamins whole grains do contain are not absorbed efficiently by the body. The Paleo diet cuts out whole grains and replaces them with unprocessed, fresh foods. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UuaUI30NR5E
Fat and Cholesterol are Good for You by Uffe Ravnskov is a new book which includes updated and simplified sections from his previous one (The Cholesterol Myths). Ravnskov also presents his own idea about the cause of heart disease, an idea that explains all the findings that do not fit with the present view. It is a powerful book. Also see his web site. The Amazon.com reviews average to 5 stars. Published January 26, 2009. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BMOjVYgYaG8
Many of you have tried some version of a stuffed vegetable at your meals such as a tuna-stuffed tomato or beef-stuffed peppers, but there is no reason why you can’t incorporate similar items into your snacks as part of your Paleo plan.  By rotating various colorful varieties of vegetables into your snacks, you’ll  be fueling your body with loads of vitamins, minerals, and anti-oxidants.  Stuffed vegetables can be made into gluten-free, grain-free, dairy-free snack options with a little creativity and advance preparation.  Definitely not taste-free, glance over some of the recipes listed below and see which one sounds like it might be a tasty addition to your snack rotation: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eiBvw_euzEw

Fibromyalgia is a complicated chronic health condition with many contributing factors. Common conditions that tend to underlie fibromyalgia are IBS (irritable bowel syndrome), intestinal hyper-permeability and autoimmune activity. Some research suggests a Paleo based diet may help autoimmune conditions, healing the gut wall and improving the underlying imbalance of gut micro-flora, which affects gut and immune function. However, despite the possible benefits of a Paleo based diet, again we strongly recommend you seek advice and support from a suitable health professional both before making any changes to your diet or physical routine. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3xnQM8qlPY4
The Primal Blueprint Cookbook: Primal, Low Carb, Paleo, Grain-Free, Dairy-Free and Gluten-Free by Mark Sisson and Jennifer Meier. Recipes include: Roasted Leg of Lamb with Herbs and Garlic, Salmon Chowder with Coconut Milk, Tomatoes Stuffed with Ground Bison and Eggs, and Baked Chocolate Custard. Recipes are simple and have limited ingredients. Complaints are the book is stuffed with unnecessary photos and proofreading could have been better, e.g. oven temperatures were left out. And recipes are not truly paleo. Despite what is on the cover dairy is used in some recipes. The Amazon reviews average to 4+ stars. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z0Iut8c-yJM
Cancer: Disease of Civilization? An anthropological and historical study by Vilhjalmur Stefansson. This classic shows what happens before and after tribes were "civilized." Covers day-to-day experience of Eskimo life. Published in 1960. Used copies are available at a steep price. To read it get it on inter-library loan. Another of his many books My Life with the Eskimo (New Edition) is available. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pOjLTpnd8r4
In addition, no statement on this website has been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration, and any product mentioned or described on this website is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. If you purchase anything through a link on this website, you should assume that we have an affiliate relationship with the company providing the product or service that you purchase, and that we will be paid in some way. We recommend that you do your own independent research before purchasing anything. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1qMoIguD8qs
Which brings us to my second point: there are few science-backed benefits to getting wrapped up in every nitty gritty ingredient in attempts to truly follow what your ancestors ate. I mean, there are now Paleo-approved packaged snacks, and I doubt cavemen were wandering the aisles of Whole Foods. If you take the basics and tweak them to fit your lifestyle, you’ll be better off.
I wrote a book called The Paleo Solution which went on to become a New York Times Bestseller. This book incorporates the latest, cutting edge research from genetics, biochemistry and anthropology to help you look, feel and perform your best. I am a research biochemist who traded in his lab coat and pocket protector for a whistle and a stopwatch to become one of the most sought after strength and conditioning coaches in the world. With my unique perspective as both scientist and coach you will learn how simple nutrition, exercise and lifestyle changes can radically change your appearance and health for the better. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HcvJIyN_Oig
Even people who hate kale will be converted after giving this recipe a try. Baking the kale in the oven removes the slightly bitter taste and makes the kale crispy. The key to getting enough crunch in your kale chips is to make sure the leaves are completely dry before you coat them in olive oil- any moisture will prevent that crunch! This basic recipe just seasons them with salt and pepper but cheese, chili powder, or vinegar can be added to make them taste just like your favorite chip flavor.

They say that low-fat weight-loss diets have proved in clinical trials and real life to be dismal failures, and that on top of it all, the percentage of fat in the American diet has been decreasing for two decades. Our cholesterol levels have been declining, and we have been smoking less, and yet the incidence of heart disease has not declined as would be expected. ”That is very disconcerting,” Willett says. ”It suggests that something else bad is happening.” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIWMOrBumSk
Eat low to moderate amounts of fruits and nuts. Try to eat mostly fruits low in sugar and high in antioxidants like berries as well as nuts high in omega-3, low in omega-6 and low in total polyunsaturated fat like macadamia nuts. Consider cutting off fruits and nuts altogether if you have an autoimmune disease, digestive problems or are trying to lose weight faster. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dhW4Cg7Yfuw
You can’t go wrong with curried cashews, as cashews are one of the more popular Paleo Nuts, and curry is a Paleo approved spice. They use honey to add a bit of sweetness to these, which only makes them more satisfying because it can hit your craving for sweet as well as savory. The best part is you can make a big batch of these and then divvy them up into smaller containers to use throughout the following week. They also point out that you can make curried pecans instead, if you happen to have pecans on hand and not cashews.
And again, there’s no concrete scientific proof that the paleo diet wards off disease, Sandon says. Any evidence of its benefits is anecdotal. Although some studies seem to support the benefits of the paleo diet, many scientists still believe we don’t yet have enough evidence to know whether the eating approach is totally healthy and without risk. “Nobody knows the long-term effects of this diet because no one has researched it to any degree,” Sandon says. It’s not really a new concept; instead it’s one that’s been recycled through the years, she adds.
Salsa is generally something that you can have on Paleo, you’ll just want to check the ingredients list to make sure that they haven’t added anything that’s not allowed. If you buy organic salsa you should be fine. In this recipe they’ve gone with fire roasted tomatoes, which will pack a bit of heat with them. They’re also using hot green chiles which will get your attention, and which might make this a no-go for those that don’t like their salsa too spicy. Try the No-Ritos recipe above for the perfect chip to dip into this spicy and hearty salsa. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U63RJiOS3TE
Nourishing Traditions: The Cookbook that Challenges Politically Correct Nutrition and the Diet Dictocrat by Mary G. Enig, Ph.D. and Sally Fallon. The premise is the culinary traditions of our ancestors, and the food choices and preparation techniques of healthy nonindustrialized peoples, should serve as the model for contemporary eating habits. However, they push whole grains and dairy, which aren't Paleolithic. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NIq35QNJlPs

Granola bars are typically a great, healthy snack for people on the go, but sadly, all of those cereal grains are not paleo at all. This paleo snack recipe creates a nut bar that is just as convenient, but it is entirely paleo. A variety of tasty nuts and seeds are held together with agave syrup and palm sugar, and they are topped with a tasty chocolate drizzle to create a protein-packed snack that can give anyone a useful energy boost. Perfect for anyone snacking on the go! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jxOFaoN4fFk
The aspects of the Paleo diet that advise eating fewer processed foods and less sugar and salt are consistent with mainstream advice about diet.[1] Diets with a paleo nutrition pattern have some similarities to traditional ethnic diets such as the Mediterranean diet that have been found to be healthier than the Western diet.[3][6] Following the Paleo diet, however, can lead to nutritional deficiencies such as those of vitamin D and calcium, which in turn could lead to compromised bone health;[1][20] it can also lead to an increased risk of ingesting toxins from high fish consumption.[3]
This single serving snack manages to taste like a decadent dessert while still being entirely healthy. This cookies and cream dip is good on slices of fresh fruit, but it is so tasty that some people just eat it with a spoon! It can quickly be whipped together from applesauce, protein powder, and a few other paleo foods that most people have in their cabinets, so it is the ideal snack for when midnight sugar cravings suddenly strike.
The paleo diet is hot. Those who follow it are attempting, they say, to mimic our ancient ancestors—minus the animal-skin fashions and the total lack of technology, of course. The adherents eschew what they believe comes from modern agriculture (wheat, dairy, legumes, for instance) and rely instead on meals full of meat, nuts, and vegetables—foods they claim are closer to what hunter-gatherers ate. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=igjjA8mgqGE
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