Several examples of recent and relatively speedy human evolution underscore that our anatomy and genetics have not been set in stone since the stone age. Within a span of 7,000 years, for instance, people adapted to eating dairy by developing lactose tolerance. Usually, the gene encoding an enzyme named lactase—which breaks down lactose sugars in milk—shuts down after infancy; when dairy became prevalent, many people evolved a mutation that kept the gene turned on throughout life. Likewise, the genetic mutation responsible for blue eyes likely arose between 6,000 and 10,000 years ago. And in regions where malaria is common, natural selection has modified people's immune systems and red blood cells in ways that help them resist the mosquito-borne disease; some of these genetic mutations appeared within the last 10,000 or even 5,000 years. The organisms with which we share our bodies have evolved even faster, particularly the billions of bacteria living in our intestines. Our gut bacteria interact with our food in many ways, helping us break down tough plant fibers, but also competing for calories. We do not have direct evidence of which bacterial species thrived in Paleolithic intestines, but we can be sure that their microbial communities do not exactly match our own. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6q-9OvUXEnk
A big soft pretzel slathered in butter, cinnamon and sugar, mustard, or cheese sauce is the ultimate guilty pleasure. These paleo pretzels are so healthy that you can snack on them without ruining your diet- how is that possible?!. Cassava flour and coconut sugar are used to create a pretzel that is the ideal blend of soft and chewy. However, be aware that these pretzels may harden up after they get cold so they are best when served right out of the oven (don’t worry, you won’t have a hard time eating them all!).

Fresh fruits, fresh vegetables, fresh meat—the paleo diet is all about eating foods straight from the Earth just as our ancestors did. Those ancestors didn't have livestock or crops to call their own, so Cordain advises to go with grass-fed and organic varieties whenever possible to limit exposure to pesticides, antibiotics, and other chemicals that didn't exist back then. Research from Emory University suggests that Paleolithic people obtained about 35% of their calories from fats, 35% from carbohydrates, and 30% from protein. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vyxPH6jPnlw
Hard-boiled eggs are a simple and easy snack. They require minimal preparation and you can easily boil a dozen at a time to have on hand as a grab-and-go snack.  While you can couple your eggs with a piece of fruit, some leftover protein, or a cold baked sweet potato for a carbohydrate source, over time the thought of eating another hard-boiled egg may turn your stomach.  If you are looking some delicious variations in the egg department, these suggestions are worth consideration:

These sweet potato chips do a great job of filling in for regular potato chips. They have the same texture you’re looking for, both as you pick them up and once you put them in your mouth. The sea salt ensures that they’re salty enough to satisfy, and the rosemary gives them a distinct flavor that really plays well with the sweet potato. And of course sweet potatoes bring a lot more to the table in regards to nutrients and fiber, so you’re actually helping yourself along with these rather than with potato chips that will only set you back.
The Primal Blueprint Cookbook: Primal, Low Carb, Paleo, Grain-Free, Dairy-Free and Gluten-Free by Mark Sisson and Jennifer Meier. Recipes include: Roasted Leg of Lamb with Herbs and Garlic, Salmon Chowder with Coconut Milk, Tomatoes Stuffed with Ground Bison and Eggs, and Baked Chocolate Custard. Recipes are simple and have limited ingredients. Complaints are the book is stuffed with unnecessary photos and proofreading could have been better, e.g. oven temperatures were left out. And recipes are not truly paleo. Despite what is on the cover dairy is used in some recipes. The Amazon reviews average to 4+ stars. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xO9hgIjup6c

Dr. Lauryn Lax is a Doctor of Occupational Therapy, Nutritional Therapy Practitioner, Functional Medicine Practitioner, author and speaker, with over 20 years of clinical and personal experience specializing in gut health, intuitive eating, food freedom, anxiety, hormone balance and women’s health. She is also a published journalist, and her work has been featured in Oxygen Magazine, Women’s Health, Paleo Magazine, Breaking Muscle, CrossFit Inc, USA Today, ABC and CBS News. She operates a virtual Functional Medicine & Nutrition practice, Thrive Wellness & Recovery, LLC, working with clients around the world to reinvent the way their body looks, moves and feels.


The China Study is frequently cited when criticizing the Paleo Diet – focusing on a vegetarian diet and consuming rice is healthier than the Paleo Diet. I respectfully disagree with that nutritional philosophy and strongly disagree with the conclusions drawn from that book [7], and will leave you to make your own conclusions based on your own self-experimentation. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D7tNzDM39W4
This single serving snack manages to taste like a decadent dessert while still being entirely healthy. This cookies and cream dip is good on slices of fresh fruit, but it is so tasty that some people just eat it with a spoon! It can quickly be whipped together from applesauce, protein powder, and a few other paleo foods that most people have in their cabinets, so it is the ideal snack for when midnight sugar cravings suddenly strike.

One part of the Paleo dieting philosophy is to not feel like foods are forbidden, but rather to cut them out because they’re not good for you. This means that all of the pre-packaged snack foods for sale should be trumped by snacks you make for yourself out of natural foods. Luckily Paleo-inspired cooks and chefs have been hard at work coming up with delicious and interesting ways to get your snack on, so enjoy! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x3wmXpfVTp4
Here’s a three-ingredient kebab combo that’s great to prep ahead of time (and trust us, they keep well enough in the fridge for a next-day snack). Cut chicken breasts into cubes and marinate in Tessemae’s Lemon Garlic Dressing for 1-3 hours. Thread cubes onto a skewer and grill for about 15 minutes, then garnish with fresh parsley. No extra sauce needed. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LssXGFdueFM
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